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Re: Brandy/Cognac

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  • miciofelice2003
    Ciao waljaco!! Nice to hear from you. I was a little bit nervous, in fact, for some particular reasons and so i was not clear in my mind. May I correct you?
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Ciao waljaco!!

      Nice to hear from you.

      I was a little bit nervous, in fact, for some particular reasons
      and so i was not clear in my mind.

      May I correct you?

      Grappa is the general name; then in some particular regions of Italy
      they call it also in some other ways.
      For example, the "filu 'e ferru" (is in sardinian dialect, that
      means "metallic wire") is a particular grappa distilled in Sardinia.

      That grappa has that name because they say that the taste is quite
      strong and rough.
      An other interpretation is that to avoid to be discovered by police,
      the sardinian distillers were used to bury the bottles of grappa and
      to put a small metallic wire as signal of the place where the
      bottles were buried.

      Curious, isn't it?

      Ciao a tutti
      da

      micio felice







      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > National pride often appears in discussions on alcoholic beverages
      > which shows that they do have an important cultural role along with
      > food. Its not only the Italians who make pomace brandy
      and 'grappa' is
      > one of countless names (e.g. filu e feru).
      > The link povided is informative for others at least(I hope!)
      >
      > 'Rubbish' is an emotive word but strictly pomace and molasses is
      the
      > end product (i.e. rubbish) of a process which has the prime
      purpose to
      > make wine or sugar crysrals. The Romans used to make a 'vino
      piccolo'
      > from pomace but I doubt if it was regarded highly. The best pomace
      > brandies come from lightly pressed grapes which still contains a
      fair
      > bit of wine rather than bone dry pomace. Possibly wine is even
      added.
      > Relax... Creative provocation is a useful rhetorical device.
      > Ciao,
      > uaglio (wal)
    • miciofelice2003
      Hi Andrew. I think the biggest obstacle is the language: I know (at least, I hope to) a little bit of english language, but this isn t my mother tongue. So,
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2006
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        Hi Andrew.

        I think the biggest obstacle is the language: I know (at least, I
        hope to) a little bit of english language, but this isn't my mother
        tongue.
        So, sometimes, happens to misunderstand a word.

        Anyway, I'm feeling proud to belong to this site.

        If sometimes I'm looking too passionate, please tell me.

        If you need to know something about grappa distillation, let me know
        and I'll do my best to help you to get a spirit coming from the past
        (but with modern methods).

        Ciao a tutti
        da

        micio felice






        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Bugal <bwyze44@...> wrote:
        >
        > Micio,
        >
        > The members are a passionate lot and thirst for the knowledge of
        the origins of their hobby. As an Italian, you should know about
        passion.
        >
        > I believe this site is more than an encyclopedia on distilling.
        I also believe hobby distilling always involves a personal touch
        from somethings almost forgotten or recipes an older person just
        happened to remember when they learn a younger person is distilling.
        >
        > You are seen as a potential expert in the production of a spirit
        from times long past that is still produced today. How was it
        done? Who started it? How can I make it authentic?
        >
        > In other words, don't take it too seriously.
        >
        > (Bloody Volvo drivers)
        >
        > Best regards,
        >
        > Bwyze
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • miciofelice2003
        Ciao Dan. I don t know if I m in time to answer your question. I m going to become used to the anglosaxon humour: anyway give me some more time. As I already
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2006
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          Ciao Dan.

          I don't know if I'm in time to answer your question.

          I'm going to become used to the anglosaxon humour: anyway give me
          some more time.

          As I already answered, you can dilute your spirit as you like.
          Personally I prefer 40% and I'm used to drink it a little bit cold
          (not freezed, only cold at 10-12 °C) in summer and at room
          temperature in winter. I don't put any ice on the glass, and also
          any soda, water, or something else.
          Just grappa.

          Oh, I forgot.

          It's better to give about three or four days of "rest" between the
          first and the second distillation. If you distilled carefully
          (referring to head and tails) you have to dilute to 18-22 % two days
          before the second run.

          If you distilled the first run following the french method (what i
          prefer) you don't need to dilute the first run.

          If you can find a root of liquorice (wood) cut it in the middle and
          put into the bottle for about one month: the taste is very good,
          believe me.

          Or you can put into your grappa a little bit (only a little bit
          because too much is toxic) of "ruta graveolens". The taste is good
          and help to digest and the colour is a beautiful green.

          ciao a tutti
          da

          micio felice


          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "polenta222" <polenta222@...>
          wrote:
          >
          >
          > Micio, I second Andrew's advice. Number 1, never lose your
          passion
          > about our national drink. And number 2, you can't take things too
          > personally on the site here. Just for the record your passion and
          > knowledge have been priceless to me. I come from a long line of
          > grappa makers, all of whom think they know what they are doing,
          but
          > they have all given me pitiful advice based on, "It must be right
          > because my grandfather and father did it this way." I have
          followed
          > your advice and think I will make better grappa as a beginner than
          > any of them because of you. Thank you for that. P.S. Please answer
          > my question from yesterday regarding how to cut my second run of
          > grappa (otherwise I will be forced to ask the foreigners on this
          > site, god forbid). Mille Gratzie.
          >
          > --Dan Zadra
          >
          >
        • waljaco
          Non problemo! Artists make beatiful creations from junk (rubbish). Skilled Distillers can make lovely drinks from what others discard, and as you can see I did
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 1, 2006
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            Non problemo!
            Artists make beatiful creations from junk (rubbish). Skilled
            Distillers can make lovely drinks from what others discard, and as you
            can see I did not ever say that rum or grappa was rubbish.
            wal
            PS Yes, I noticed that homedistilling in Italy is still very secretive
            and seeing the price of official grappa I can see why. The best
            grappa I actually tasted in Moneglia (Liguria) made from local white
            grapes.

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "miciofelice2003"
            <miciofelice2003@...> wrote:
            >
            > Ciao waljaco!!
            >
            > Nice to hear from you.
            >
            > I was a little bit nervous, in fact, for some particular reasons
            > and so i was not clear in my mind.
            >
            > May I correct you?
            >
            > Grappa is the general name; then in some particular regions of Italy
            > they call it also in some other ways.
            > For example, the "filu 'e ferru" (is in sardinian dialect, that
            > means "metallic wire") is a particular grappa distilled in Sardinia.
            >
            > That grappa has that name because they say that the taste is quite
            > strong and rough.
            > An other interpretation is that to avoid to be discovered by police,
            > the sardinian distillers were used to bury the bottles of grappa and
            > to put a small metallic wire as signal of the place where the
            > bottles were buried.
            >
            > Curious, isn't it?
            >
            > Ciao a tutti
            > da
            >
            > micio felice
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
            > >
            > > National pride often appears in discussions on alcoholic beverages
            > > which shows that they do have an important cultural role along with
            > > food. Its not only the Italians who make pomace brandy
            > and 'grappa' is
            > > one of countless names (e.g. filu e feru).
            > > The link povided is informative for others at least(I hope!)
            > >
            > > 'Rubbish' is an emotive word but strictly pomace and molasses is
            > the
            > > end product (i.e. rubbish) of a process which has the prime
            > purpose to
            > > make wine or sugar crysrals. The Romans used to make a 'vino
            > piccolo'
            > > from pomace but I doubt if it was regarded highly. The best pomace
            > > brandies come from lightly pressed grapes which still contains a
            > fair
            > > bit of wine rather than bone dry pomace. Possibly wine is even
            > added.
            > > Relax... Creative provocation is a useful rhetorical device.
            > > Ciao,
            > > uaglio (wal)
            >
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