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Re.Cooling Portion Question

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  • burrows206
    I had the same misgivings about the still head when I started to build one,and contacted the still designer(Bob Lennon) and he explained it the open top,
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 3, 2006
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      I had the same misgivings about the still head when I started to
      build one,and contacted the still designer(Bob Lennon) and he
      explained it the open top, better than I could ever do, so here it
      is:-
      From the still designer "Stillmaker"

      Quote :-

      "Contrary to intuition, the condenser shell on the still is left
      open to the
      atmosphere.
      This is not a mistake, and to cap or seal the shell would cause the
      pressures inside the still to rise to a dangerous level, and
      eventually
      would blow the thermometer/safety cap off the column.
      And while it seems intuitive that the vapours would be lost to the
      atmosphere
      at this point, sometimes intuition can be misleading.
      What really happens, if you take a closer look at the still
      operation, is
      that a relatively large volume of hot saturated vapour is reduced to
      the
      small volume of a few drops of distillate as the vapour passes over
      the
      cooling coils.
      This reduction in volume causes a partial vacuum or lower pressure
      at that
      point. When that happens, the outside atmosphere immediately rushes
      in to
      fill the void. So in reality the flow goes from the outside
      atmosphere into
      the still, and not the other way around.
      Because of this, no vapours are lost to the atmosphere if the still
      is
      operated properly. However, that is not to say that you could not
      overcome
      the condenser capacity by applying excessive heat to the boiler."

      End quote I hope that explains it OK
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