Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Sambuca Recipe Using Star Anise and not Anise Seed

Expand Messages
  • waljaco
    Sambuca is derived from Sambuca di Sicilia where the Saracens/Arabs made aniseed based cordials. The elder bush in Italian is sambuco nero and although
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 31, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Sambuca is derived from 'Sambuca di Sicilia' where the Saracens/Arabs
      made aniseed based cordials. The elder bush in Italian is 'sambuco
      nero' and although elderflowers can be used for flavouring, the close
      similarity in names is coincidental.
      wal
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "italiandistiller"
      > <italiandistiller@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > In Italy the best Sambucas are made from star anise and not anise
      > > seed. I've been looking for a good recipe for Sambuca but find
      > many
      > > posted recipes and prepared extracts use anise seed and not the
      > star
      > > anise.
      > >
      > > Anise seed is a member of the parsley family and found abundantly
      > in
      > > the Eastern Mediterranean. Greek ouzo for example is made with the
      > > anise seed. Star anise is the fruit of a small evergreen tree
      > native
      > > pretty much soley to southwest China. The plant grows a small star-
      > > shaped fruit with 8 star points each having a seed inside. All
      > parts
      > > of the fruit are used. It is more bitter than the anise seed and
      > it
      > > is this Star anise that is used to compound the main ingredient in
      > > Tamiflu, the only antidote for bird flu. They extract the shikimic
      > > acid from the star anise as a base for Tamiflu, primarily done in
      > > Swizerland, by Roche I believe.
      > >
      > > Bird flu aside, can anyone offer a good recipe for making correct
      > > sambuca, either light or dark?
      > >
      > > Here's to our Health, Wealth & Happiness!
      > >
      > > Bob
      > >
      >
      >
      > Interesting info on the bird flu antidote. The Sambucca/star anise
      > info will probably open a spirited (pun intended) debate. ;-)
      > I note your netname is italiandistiller, and I would not presume
      > to 'teach grandma to suck eggs', so to speak. However, most of the
      > info I've seen says aniseed, Witch Elder and Licorice.
      > I haven't seen Star Anise mentioned at all. See below...
      >
      > ----------------------------------------
      >
      > Sambuca is a liqueur produced by the infusion of Witch Elder bush
      > and Licorice. The name 'Sambuca' originates from the scientific name
      > for the elder tree, 'Sambuca Nigra', which grows abundantly
      > throughout Italy. The oil from the elder tree is used in the
      > production of Sambuca as also are the white elder blossoms which,
      > after distillation, along with the anise seeds and various other
      > ingredients, create Sambuca's unique flavor. It comes in two
      > different forms: the traditional white and the less popular black.
      >
      > The liqueur's name, Sambuca, is derived from an Arab term, possibly
      > zammut. The drink first which "landed" in the Port of Civitavecchia
      > aboard ships having originated from the Asia.The Italianized name
      > was given to a liqueur, also anise-based, born in Civitavecchia a
      > long while before then, which hence had nothing to do with the
      > sambuco plant. In fact, an anise-based liqueur named sambuca has
      > been produced for over 130 years in this port city in the province
      > of Rome.
      >
      > http://people.bath.ac.uk/mn2dmp/
      > --------------------------------------
      >
      > Anise Liqueur - Zammù
      >
      > This liqueur, now quite famous as sambuca, was originally an Arab-
      > Sicilian invention for medicinal and disinfectant purposes. The
      > taste is similar to Pernod or Ouzo.
      >
      > 1 Quart 100-proof vodka
      > 3/4 cup sugar
      > 1/4 cup aniseed
      > Grated peel of 1 lemon
      >
      >
      > Combine the vodka, sugar, aniseed, and lemon zest in a sterilized 2-
      > quart juice jar or other bottle. Mix and let stand for 30 days,
      > shaking it from time to time. Filter it and bottle it, and it is
      > ready to use.
      >
      > When serving, mix the liqueur with lots of ice water and sugar.
      >
      > Makes 1 quart.
      >
      > Recipe by Wright
      >
      >
      > http://dieli.net/SicilyPage/RecipesPage/recipes.html#al
      > --------------------------------------------
      >
      > Around the Mediterranean from Lebanon in the east to Spain in the
      > west practically all countries produce a version of anise flavoured
      > distillates under a range of names: the Arabs call it arak, Turks
      > raki, Greeks ouzo, Italians sambucca, French pastis and Spaniards
      > anisado.
      >
      > Of all the Arabic, speaking countries Lebanon reputedly produces the
      > best arak and the very best of them sells for more than Scotch
      > whisky in that country.
      > For Lebanese arak means a clear flavourful distillate to be diluted
      > with sufficient water and consume alongside food.
      >
      > The Bekaa Valley south east of Beirut, considered the pearl of the
      > Mediterranean before the almost 20 year of armed conflict ruined it,
      > is well known for its arak, but the best of all comes from artisan
      > distillers with very small operations or restaurant owners who also
      > distil their own.
      >
      > In the valley, there is at least one restaurant owner who buys
      > obeidah grapes (supposedly the mother grape of Chardonnay) presses
      > them and ferments the juice naturally. After the fermentation, the
      > weakly alcoholic liquid is left to settle and then filtered to
      > remove the crudest suspended matter. Subsequently the liquid is
      > distilled in copper stills produced by skilled Arab masters.
      >
      > During the first and subsequent runs the fore shots and faints are
      > carefully separated, collected and redistilled to minimize methyl
      > alcohol content.
      >
      > In fact, it is the separation of alcohol and water that Arab
      > alchemists discovered and then refined it by redistillation of the
      > aforementioned parts for purity.
      >
      > After the first distillation at 70 percent ABV, the distillate is
      > diluted to 53 percent ABV and redistilled in the presence of
      > unwashed, uncrushed anise from the village of Hinel on the Mount
      > Hermon close to the Syrian border. Still the second run is
      > separated, and redistilled twice more to obtain the ebst arak
      > imaginable.
      >
      > http://www.foodreference.com/html/artaraketc.html
      > ------------------------------------------------
      >
      > Sambuca
      > An Italian liqueur, flavored with anise, elderberrys, sugar and a
      > secret combination of herbs and spices giving a licorice taste.
      > Sambucas nigra the scientific name for the elderberry.
      >
      > Classic Brands:
      > Molinari, Opal Nera, Di Trev, Romana, Galliano, Basilica
      >
      > http://www.licorice.org/LicoriceFinder/Sambuca/body_sambuca.htm
      > -------------------------------------------
      >
      > The Bar: Molinari Sambuca
      >
      > Molinari was develolped in 1945 by the Molinari Family in
      > Civitavecchia, Italy. Molinari Sambuca Extra is an imported Italian
      > liqueur with a unique flavor derived from the precious anise seed.
      > Molinari has a delicate smooth tasted and aroma that is enjoyable by
      > itself or with coffee. 42% Alcohol (840 Proof).
      >
      > http://www.sicilianculture.com/bar/molinari.htm
      > -------------------------------------------
      >
      > Adult guests enjoyed "zammu" with their coffee; "zammu" or anise
      > liqueur is produced by combining 1 quart of vodka with 3/4 cup of
      > sugar, 1/4 cup aniseed, and grated lemon peel. It's brewed and
      > periodically shaken for a month, then filtered and bottled. "Zammu"
      > brings to mind the Arab-Sicilian poet Ibn Zaffir who, a thousand
      > years ago, wrote: "In Sicily, the trees have fire in their leaves
      > and water in their roots."
      >
      > http://cyberitalian.com/html/gal_73.htm
      > ----------------------------------------
      >
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry
      >
    • Harry
      ... All the European ones perhaps, but the Columbians in South America have had one since the mid 1600 s. Possibly one of the oldest White Rums, Aguardiente
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > All the aniseed based distillates originated in the Mediterranean
        > Basin and used local aniseed.




        All the European ones perhaps, but the Columbians in South America
        have had one since the mid 1600's. Possibly one of the oldest White
        Rums, Aguardiente is made from sugar cane molasses and aniseed.
        http://home.earthlink.net/~cafe.tinto/aguardiente.htm

        Perhaps the anise idea was added through contact with Spanish
        colonists, it's not known for certain. But the natives of the area
        certainly had distilled liquor before colonization. Archeologists
        have unearthed crude bottles in digs from well before the time of the
        Conquistadors. Much of South America's early history is still a
        mystery.


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • LISETTA FAROM
        Hi to everybody and wishes of a good new year. In this period, in Italy, you/they are publicizing her/it sambuca Averna where you/he/she is done present that
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 1, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi to everybody and wishes of a good new year.
          In this period, in Italy, you/they are publicizing her/it "sambuca
          Averna" where you/he/she is done present that the product and' done
          exclusively using the starry anise to 100%, Ciao a tutti.

          http://www.google.it/search?
          hl=it&q=ANICE+ANICE+STELLATO+SAMBUCA+AVERNA&btnG=Cerca&meta=lr%
          3Dlang_it


          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
          > >
          > > All the aniseed based distillates originated in the Mediterranean
          > > Basin and used local aniseed.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > All the European ones perhaps, but the Columbians in South America
          > have had one since the mid 1600's. Possibly one of the oldest
          White
          > Rums, Aguardiente is made from sugar cane molasses and aniseed.
          > http://home.earthlink.net/~cafe.tinto/aguardiente.htm
          >
          > Perhaps the anise idea was added through contact with Spanish
          > colonists, it's not known for certain. But the natives of the
          area
          > certainly had distilled liquor before colonization. Archeologists
          > have unearthed crude bottles in digs from well before the time of
          the
          > Conquistadors. Much of South America's early history is still a
          > mystery.
          >
          >
          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
          >
        • waljaco
          Bolivian (& Columbian) anisado is Spanish influenced. Possibly the base spirit is sugarcane based unlike the grape based Spanish original. Although Central and
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 1, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Bolivian (& Columbian) anisado is Spanish influenced. Possibly the
            base spirit is sugarcane based unlike the grape based Spanish original.
            Although Central and South American indigenes had fermented alcoholic
            beverages there is no proof that they distilled prior to European
            colonisation.
            Aguardiente is Spanish for the Latin 'aqua ardente' (burning water).
            It is a generic term.
            wal

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
            > >
            > > All the aniseed based distillates originated in the Mediterranean
            > > Basin and used local aniseed.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > All the European ones perhaps, but the Columbians in South America
            > have had one since the mid 1600's. Possibly one of the oldest White
            > Rums, Aguardiente is made from sugar cane molasses and aniseed.
            > http://home.earthlink.net/~cafe.tinto/aguardiente.htm
            >
            > Perhaps the anise idea was added through contact with Spanish
            > colonists, it's not known for certain. But the natives of the area
            > certainly had distilled liquor before colonization. Archeologists
            > have unearthed crude bottles in digs from well before the time of the
            > Conquistadors. Much of South America's early history is still a
            > mystery.
            >
            >
            > Slainte!
            > regards Harry
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.