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Glenmorangie Part II

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  • Harry
    Part II The Mash: There are two methods of preparing the mash. This goes for all home- styled Scotch whiskies, not just Glenmorangie. The first, most
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 8, 2005
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      Part II

      The Mash:
      There are two methods of preparing the mash. This goes for all home-
      styled Scotch whiskies, not just Glenmorangie. The first, most
      traditional is all-grain. The second, is a combination of peated
      malt and extract (LME). The all grain method is suitable for those
      who have background and skills as all-grain beer brewers. The
      second is for the many who have difficulty with conversion of
      starches, or just plain don't like the work, mess and fuss attached
      to all-grain (that's most of us). With beers a connoisseur can tell
      the difference. With distilled spirits only a 75yo Highlander could
      pick it, and he wouldn't say 'the nae' if the dram was free.

      All Grain Mash
      The first thing you need to consider is the peated malt. This is
      the one constant distinction between Scotch malts. When you talk of
      peat, you are really talking of the phenols imparted by the peat
      smoke. These are measured in parts per million (ppm) of finished
      whiskies. Glenmorangie is light to moderate in phenol, around 8 or
      9 ppm. Some, like the Islay malts, are closer to 45 ppm. If
      there's one way of experimenting and adjusting your mashes that will
      produce noticeable changes, it's varying the peated malt fraction of
      the grain bill. You need to use a peated malt somewhat higher in
      phenols than your desired finished product, as some of the phenols
      get left behind during distillation, although most are recycled
      through the feints to the next batch (more on that later).

      You can buy peated malt grain from homebrew outlets, but it is only
      around the 15 to 17 ppm mark. Consequently you can't make the
      stronger Islay type malts at home, unless you get really
      enthusiastic and peat your own malt, or add something like a smoke
      essence to your finished spirit. However, 15 to 17 ppm is ideal as
      a starting point for Glenmorangie. Just tone it down a fraction by
      mixing it 3 : 1 with unpeated malt (3 of peated, 1 of unpeated).
      This will give a finished spirit in the range of Glenmorangie.

      Do your mash & sparge as per the usual brewing methods, with one
      very important exception i.e. do NOT use hops. Hops when
      concentrated by distillation give a very overpowering bitter taste
      and is the reason you can't just take beer and distill it. Aim for
      a wort of around 8% potential alcohol and a quick ferment with a
      combination of baker's and brewer's yeasts, to finish in about 3 to
      4 days. Let it settle for a further 1 or 2 days after the bubbling
      has all-but stopped, to let the yeast re-absorb excess diacetyl,
      then do the first distillation.

      Some will tell you that you can make a much higher gravity wort and
      use a turbo-type yeast, or a high-attenuation yeast like Lalvin EC-
      1118 or Red Star (same strain). You can, but what you finish up
      with will not even remotely resemble Glenmorangie, or any other
      Scotch malt. The yeast used plays a far more important role in
      producing Scotch than mere carbohydrate conversion. It is a huge
      factor in the taste of the finished article. For this reason, it is
      better to follow the methods used by the distilleries, that of a
      fast-acting yeast (bakers, ~1gm/litre) to quickly start the
      fermentation and stop other yeasts & bacteria getting a foothold,
      and a brewers yeast (0.6gm/litre)to get the desired flavours into
      the fermentation.

      Extract Mash
      Extract mash is fairly simple to do. It uses peated malt as a
      flavouring adjunct, and if the temperature is handled correctly most
      of the starch will also convert, but this is not so critical as with
      an all grain batch. For a standard sized wort ~25 litres, heat 15
      litres of water to 70°C (158°F), add 2 kg peated malt grain, put a
      lid on it and wrap the pot in towels to hold in the heat. Let it
      sit for about 1/2 an hour. Strain it through a cotton pillow-case,
      rinse the grains with 4 litres of hot water (77°C, 170°F).

      To the 19 litres of hot fluid, add 6 kg liquid malt extract (LME,
      pale malt extract, NO hops) and stir in until dissolved. DO NOT
      boil this mixture as you will scorch the extract syrup. Cool the
      wort as quickly as possible. Use a wort chiller, or decant it into
      smaller quantities and put it in the fridge. It needs to be ~25 to
      26°C (77 to 80°F). Transfer to your fermenter, stir in plenty of
      air in the process, pitch the yeasts and airlock it. Follow the
      same procedure re fermentation time, as for all grain.

      This should get you started on the road to Glenmorangie Scotch.
      Part III, the distillation, follows soon.

      Slainte!
      Regards Harry
      Moderator
    • Robert Hubble
      Harry and Sascha, First Harry; thanks for the 3-part diatribe, which I ll be using next month. Your information was incredibly timely, and in wonderful detail.
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 10, 2005
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        Harry and Sascha,

        First Harry; thanks for the 3-part diatribe, which I'll be using next month.
        Your information was incredibly timely, and in wonderful detail. In
        short, everything i wanted to know.

        Sascha, I am running a tall unpacked potstill, based on a 5-gallon pressure
        cooker with a screw-in 2"x24" copper pipe column, 45-degree lyne arm feeding
        a modified Leibig condenser. The dimensions were sorta pulled out my ass,
        and modified by what materials were available, but it's close to what Harry
        describes, and acts pretty much like the still he suggests.

        I've been using this still for about 8 months, and the design was intended
        to have similar proportions to the tall scotch stills from various
        distillers, and has a fair amount of "accidental" reflux from ambient
        cooling. If there is a problem, it is that while the product is
        exceptionally smooth, it is also exceptionally light in flavor, as Harry
        predicts. Fortunately, it is possible to control the reflux somewhat by
        insulating the column. Simply wrapping rags around it has produced some
        nicely stronger flavors, and I'm experimenting with that now.

        I can't wait to combine Harry's recipe and procedure with my still.


        >From: "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...>
        >Reply-To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        >To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [Distillers] Glenmorangie Part II
        >Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2005 06:36:14 -0000
        >
        >Part II
        >
        >The Mash:
        >There are two methods of preparing the mash. This goes for all home-
        >styled Scotch whiskies, not just Glenmorangie. The first, most
        >traditional is all-grain. The second, is a combination of peated
        >malt and extract (LME). The all grain method is suitable for those
        >who have background and skills as all-grain beer brewers. The
        >second is for the many who have difficulty with conversion of
        >starches, or just plain don't like the work, mess and fuss attached
        >to all-grain (that's most of us). With beers a connoisseur can tell
        >the difference. With distilled spirits only a 75yo Highlander could
        >pick it, and he wouldn't say 'the nae' if the dram was free.
        >
        >All Grain Mash
        >The first thing you need to consider is the peated malt. This is
        >the one constant distinction between Scotch malts. When you talk of
        >peat, you are really talking of the phenols imparted by the peat
        >smoke. These are measured in parts per million (ppm) of finished
        >whiskies. Glenmorangie is light to moderate in phenol, around 8 or
        >9 ppm. Some, like the Islay malts, are closer to 45 ppm. If
        >there's one way of experimenting and adjusting your mashes that will
        >produce noticeable changes, it's varying the peated malt fraction of
        >the grain bill. You need to use a peated malt somewhat higher in
        >phenols than your desired finished product, as some of the phenols
        >get left behind during distillation, although most are recycled
        >through the feints to the next batch (more on that later).
        >
        >You can buy peated malt grain from homebrew outlets, but it is only
        >around the 15 to 17 ppm mark. Consequently you can't make the
        >stronger Islay type malts at home, unless you get really
        >enthusiastic and peat your own malt, or add something like a smoke
        >essence to your finished spirit. However, 15 to 17 ppm is ideal as
        >a starting point for Glenmorangie. Just tone it down a fraction by
        >mixing it 3 : 1 with unpeated malt (3 of peated, 1 of unpeated).
        >This will give a finished spirit in the range of Glenmorangie.
        >
        >Do your mash & sparge as per the usual brewing methods, with one
        >very important exception i.e. do NOT use hops. Hops when
        >concentrated by distillation give a very overpowering bitter taste
        >and is the reason you can't just take beer and distill it. Aim for
        >a wort of around 8% potential alcohol and a quick ferment with a
        >combination of baker's and brewer's yeasts, to finish in about 3 to
        >4 days. Let it settle for a further 1 or 2 days after the bubbling
        >has all-but stopped, to let the yeast re-absorb excess diacetyl,
        >then do the first distillation.
        >
        >Some will tell you that you can make a much higher gravity wort and
        >use a turbo-type yeast, or a high-attenuation yeast like Lalvin EC-
        >1118 or Red Star (same strain). You can, but what you finish up
        >with will not even remotely resemble Glenmorangie, or any other
        >Scotch malt. The yeast used plays a far more important role in
        >producing Scotch than mere carbohydrate conversion. It is a huge
        >factor in the taste of the finished article. For this reason, it is
        >better to follow the methods used by the distilleries, that of a
        >fast-acting yeast (bakers, ~1gm/litre) to quickly start the
        >fermentation and stop other yeasts & bacteria getting a foothold,
        >and a brewers yeast (0.6gm/litre)to get the desired flavours into
        >the fermentation.
        >
        >Extract Mash
        >Extract mash is fairly simple to do. It uses peated malt as a
        >flavouring adjunct, and if the temperature is handled correctly most
        >of the starch will also convert, but this is not so critical as with
        >an all grain batch. For a standard sized wort ~25 litres, heat 15
        >litres of water to 70�C (158�F), add 2 kg peated malt grain, put a
        >lid on it and wrap the pot in towels to hold in the heat. Let it
        >sit for about 1/2 an hour. Strain it through a cotton pillow-case,
        >rinse the grains with 4 litres of hot water (77�C, 170�F).
        >
        >To the 19 litres of hot fluid, add 6 kg liquid malt extract (LME,
        >pale malt extract, NO hops) and stir in until dissolved. DO NOT
        >boil this mixture as you will scorch the extract syrup. Cool the
        >wort as quickly as possible. Use a wort chiller, or decant it into
        >smaller quantities and put it in the fridge. It needs to be ~25 to
        >26�C (77 to 80�F). Transfer to your fermenter, stir in plenty of
        >air in the process, pitch the yeasts and airlock it. Follow the
        >same procedure re fermentation time, as for all grain.
        >
        >This should get you started on the road to Glenmorangie Scotch.
        >Part III, the distillation, follows soon.
        >
        >Slainte!
        >Regards Harry
        >Moderator
        >
        >
        >
        >

        _________________________________________________________________
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      • Sasha
        His article was good wasn t it :)! I would be interested in hearing about your product using Harry s proceedure. Let me know how it turns out and any bumps
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 10, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          His article was good wasn't it :)! I would be interested in hearing
          about your product using Harry's proceedure. Let me know how it
          turns out and any bumps you might encounter along the way that I
          might run into too..
          Thanks
          Sasha.


          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Hubble" <zymurgybob@h...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Harry and Sascha,
          >
          > First Harry; thanks for the 3-part diatribe, which I'll be using
          next month.
          > Your information was incredibly timely, and in wonderful detail.
          In
          > short, everything i wanted to know.
          >
          > Sascha, I am running a tall unpacked potstill, based on a 5-gallon
          pressure
          > cooker with a screw-in 2"x24" copper pipe column, 45-degree lyne
          arm feeding
          > a modified Leibig condenser. The dimensions were sorta pulled out
          my ass,
          > and modified by what materials were available, but it's close to
          what Harry
          > describes, and acts pretty much like the still he suggests.
          >
          > I've been using this still for about 8 months, and the design was
          intended
          > to have similar proportions to the tall scotch stills from various
          > distillers, and has a fair amount of "accidental" reflux from
          ambient
          > cooling. If there is a problem, it is that while the product is
          > exceptionally smooth, it is also exceptionally light in flavor, as
          Harry
          > predicts. Fortunately, it is possible to control the reflux
          somewhat by
          > insulating the column. Simply wrapping rags around it has produced
          some
          > nicely stronger flavors, and I'm experimenting with that now.
          >
          > I can't wait to combine Harry's recipe and procedure with my still.
          >
          >
          > >From: "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
          > >Reply-To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > >To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > >Subject: [Distillers] Glenmorangie Part II
          > >Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2005 06:36:14 -0000
          > >
          > >Part II
          > >
          > >The Mash:
          > >There are two methods of preparing the mash. This goes for all
          home-
          > >styled Scotch whiskies, not just Glenmorangie. The first, most
          > >traditional is all-grain. The second, is a combination of peated
          > >malt and extract (LME). The all grain method is suitable for those
          > >who have background and skills as all-grain beer brewers. The
          > >second is for the many who have difficulty with conversion of
          > >starches, or just plain don't like the work, mess and fuss attached
          > >to all-grain (that's most of us). With beers a connoisseur can
          tell
          > >the difference. With distilled spirits only a 75yo Highlander
          could
          > >pick it, and he wouldn't say 'the nae' if the dram was free.
          > >
          > >All Grain Mash
          > >The first thing you need to consider is the peated malt. This is
          > >the one constant distinction between Scotch malts. When you talk
          of
          > >peat, you are really talking of the phenols imparted by the peat
          > >smoke. These are measured in parts per million (ppm) of finished
          > >whiskies. Glenmorangie is light to moderate in phenol, around 8 or
          > >9 ppm. Some, like the Islay malts, are closer to 45 ppm. If
          > >there's one way of experimenting and adjusting your mashes that
          will
          > >produce noticeable changes, it's varying the peated malt fraction
          of
          > >the grain bill. You need to use a peated malt somewhat higher in
          > >phenols than your desired finished product, as some of the phenols
          > >get left behind during distillation, although most are recycled
          > >through the feints to the next batch (more on that later).
          > >
          > >You can buy peated malt grain from homebrew outlets, but it is only
          > >around the 15 to 17 ppm mark. Consequently you can't make the
          > >stronger Islay type malts at home, unless you get really
          > >enthusiastic and peat your own malt, or add something like a smoke
          > >essence to your finished spirit. However, 15 to 17 ppm is ideal as
          > >a starting point for Glenmorangie. Just tone it down a fraction by
          > >mixing it 3 : 1 with unpeated malt (3 of peated, 1 of unpeated).
          > >This will give a finished spirit in the range of Glenmorangie.
          > >
          > >Do your mash & sparge as per the usual brewing methods, with one
          > >very important exception i.e. do NOT use hops. Hops when
          > >concentrated by distillation give a very overpowering bitter taste
          > >and is the reason you can't just take beer and distill it. Aim for
          > >a wort of around 8% potential alcohol and a quick ferment with a
          > >combination of baker's and brewer's yeasts, to finish in about 3 to
          > >4 days. Let it settle for a further 1 or 2 days after the bubbling
          > >has all-but stopped, to let the yeast re-absorb excess diacetyl,
          > >then do the first distillation.
          > >
          > >Some will tell you that you can make a much higher gravity wort and
          > >use a turbo-type yeast, or a high-attenuation yeast like Lalvin EC-
          > >1118 or Red Star (same strain). You can, but what you finish up
          > >with will not even remotely resemble Glenmorangie, or any other
          > >Scotch malt. The yeast used plays a far more important role in
          > >producing Scotch than mere carbohydrate conversion. It is a huge
          > >factor in the taste of the finished article. For this reason, it
          is
          > >better to follow the methods used by the distilleries, that of a
          > >fast-acting yeast (bakers, ~1gm/litre) to quickly start the
          > >fermentation and stop other yeasts & bacteria getting a foothold,
          > >and a brewers yeast (0.6gm/litre)to get the desired flavours into
          > >the fermentation.
          > >
          > >Extract Mash
          > >Extract mash is fairly simple to do. It uses peated malt as a
          > >flavouring adjunct, and if the temperature is handled correctly
          most
          > >of the starch will also convert, but this is not so critical as
          with
          > >an all grain batch. For a standard sized wort ~25 litres, heat 15
          > >litres of water to 70°C (158°F), add 2 kg peated malt grain, put a
          > >lid on it and wrap the pot in towels to hold in the heat. Let it
          > >sit for about 1/2 an hour. Strain it through a cotton pillow-case,
          > >rinse the grains with 4 litres of hot water (77°C, 170°F).
          > >
          > >To the 19 litres of hot fluid, add 6 kg liquid malt extract (LME,
          > >pale malt extract, NO hops) and stir in until dissolved. DO NOT
          > >boil this mixture as you will scorch the extract syrup. Cool the
          > >wort as quickly as possible. Use a wort chiller, or decant it into
          > >smaller quantities and put it in the fridge. It needs to be ~25 to
          > >26°C (77 to 80°F). Transfer to your fermenter, stir in plenty of
          > >air in the process, pitch the yeasts and airlock it. Follow the
          > >same procedure re fermentation time, as for all grain.
          > >
          > >This should get you started on the road to Glenmorangie Scotch.
          > >Part III, the distillation, follows soon.
          > >
          > >Slainte!
          > >Regards Harry
          > >Moderator
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > _________________________________________________________________
          > FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar – get it now!
          > http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/
          >
        • Robert Hubble
          Sascha. It s a deal. I hope to have great news! ... *CLIP* Zymurgy Bob _________________________________________________________________ Is your PC infected?
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 11, 2005
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            Sascha.

            It's a deal. I hope to have great news!


            >From: "Sasha" <blackrabbit.namespace@...>
            >Reply-To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
            >To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [Distillers] Re: Glenmorangie Part II (actually Part III)
            >Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 08:34:20 -0000
            >
            >His article was good wasn't it :)! I would be interested in hearing
            >about your product using Harry's proceedure. Let me know how it
            >turns out and any bumps you might encounter along the way that I
            >might run into too..
            >Thanks
            >Sasha.
            >
            >
            >--- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Hubble" <zymurgybob@h...>
            >wrote:
            > >
            > > Harry and Sascha,
            > >
            > > First Harry; thanks for the 3-part diatribe, which I'll be using
            >next month.

            *CLIP*

            Zymurgy Bob

            _________________________________________________________________
            Is your PC infected? Get a FREE online computer virus scan from McAfee�
            Security. http://clinic.mcafee.com/clinic/ibuy/campaign.asp?cid=3963
          • Henry Stamp
            (digging through my overwealmed inbox...) awesome articles harry, I m *definitely* using this as my guide when i try my first whiskey. my only question is
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 2 1:25 PM
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              (digging through my overwealmed inbox...)

              awesome articles harry, I'm *definitely* using this as my guide when i
              try my first whiskey. my only question is this:

              any specific yeast strain recommendations to get the most authentic
              flavor? i have access to white labs yeasts, these seem like likely
              candidates:

              Edinburgh Ale
              English Ale
              Irish Ale
              British Ale

              -henry

              > Aim for
              > a wort of around 8% potential alcohol and a quick ferment with a
              > combination of baker's and brewer's yeasts, to finish in about 3 to
              > 4 days. Let it settle for a further 1 or 2 days after the bubbling
              > has all-but stopped, to let the yeast re-absorb excess diacetyl,
              > then do the first distillation.
              >



              > Some will tell you that you can make a much higher gravity wort and
              > use a turbo-type yeast, or a high-attenuation yeast like Lalvin EC-
              > 1118 or Red Star (same strain). You can, but what you finish up
              > with will not even remotely resemble Glenmorangie, or any other
              > Scotch malt. The yeast used plays a far more important role in
              > producing Scotch than mere carbohydrate conversion. It is a huge
              > factor in the taste of the finished article. For this reason, it is
              > better to follow the methods used by the distilleries, that of a
              > fast-acting yeast (bakers, ~1gm/litre) to quickly start the
              > fermentation and stop other yeasts & bacteria getting a foothold,
              > and a brewers yeast (0.6gm/litre)to get the desired flavours into
              > the fermentation.
              >
              >
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