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Re: Pot still shape

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  • waljaco@hotmail.com
    Whisky alembics (pot stills) come in a number of shapes: 1) Classic Pot Still (as Springbank ) 2) Onion shape (slightly fatter than the above - Glenlivet )
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 4, 2001
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      Whisky alembics (pot stills) come in a number of shapes:
      1) Classic Pot Still (as 'Springbank')
      2) Onion shape (slightly fatter than the above - 'Glenlivet')
      3) Boil ball (there is a bulge at the start of the neck -
      'Strathmill')
      4) Pear shape (as if pot and neck have combined - 'Vintage Islay')
      5) Lomond Still (there is a boil ball and a cylindrical neck which
      contains 3 adjustible reflux plates - 'Dalmore', 'Miltonduff')
      Some distilleries use ex London Gin stills which have long columns
      for greater reflux. The gin head for botanicals is still there.
      Most stills are 4.5 metres tall.
      Lyne arms vary:
      1) horizontal
      2) 30 degree steep drop
      3) 30 degree steep incline

      All this effects reflux - mainly I think in the neck (column) and
      lyne arm.
      The Lomond Still was designed by the chemical engineer Alistair
      Cunningham in 1955. It has a wide neck which houses 3 adjustable
      plates to vary the amount of reflux and so vary the style of whisky
      produced. The plates could either be filled with cool liquid to
      increase the reflux or left dry. They could also be rotated - the
      horizontal position would maximise reflux while the vertical position
      would produce the least reflux. Unfortunately the plates get dirty
      causing heat transfer and cleaning problems.
      For the home distiller's pot still, the main influence would be I
      suspect, the length of the neck, the length and incline of the lyne
      arm as there would not be much reflux going on the roof of the pot
      because of the high temperature inside.

      Wal
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