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Re: [Distillers] Re: I have a problem (???) . NO: I HAD A PROBLEM !!!

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  • Robert Thomas
    ... ... yup, great resource (shame it doesn t get looked at enough). ... which I believe Berglund recons to be unsavable (but I may be wrong, haven t
    Message 1 of 21 , Nov 29, 2005
      --- Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

      <snip>
      >
      > Heh, 'tis pleased I am to note that there are people
      > out there
      > actually partaking of the fare on offer at tastylime
      > (have you
      > checked who owns and populates the site? ;-)) )

      yup, great resource (shame it doesn't get looked at
      enough).

      >
      > From Chris' tome...
      >
      > "Depending on the ester content 20% or more of the
      > faulty distillate
      > are adjusted with a base to pH 5.6-5.8, distilled
      > separately and
      > afterwards mixed with the main stock. After the
      > dilution the main
      > stock is entirely neutralized and mixed with an
      > excess amount of
      > sodium bicarbonate base. Through heating to 75 °C
      > for 2 hours the
      > ester splitting is achieved. After acidification to
      > a pH of 5.6-5.8
      > the distillation can proceed normally."
      >
      > Micio's problem was not one of excess
      > esterification, rather a
      > starting pomice of considerable putrefaction.
      which I believe Berglund recons to be unsavable (but I
      may be wrong, haven't read it for a little while).

      > Therefore the
      > statement stands:- FRESH pomice, REDUCED to pH3 to
      > inhibit
      > bacterial growth. THEN 2 distillations. 1st
      > distillation, collect
      > all that is feasible. 2nd distillation, bring the
      > pH up with
      > Sodium Bicarbonate to a point somewhat less than
      > neutral (5. 6 -
      > 5.8, according to Chris Berglund).
      Why bother with the bicarb? I thought the problem was
      a corroding still, and that the product was fine.
      If the icky still was caused by the rotten pomace,
      then using fresh pomace solves the problem, without
      needing bicarb, that could/will alter the flavour
      profile and development.
      Cheers,
      Rob.

      >
      > I see your point, Rob. But in this case I think you
      > will find the
      > flavours of the fresh pomice will carry over quite
      > nicely. Micio is
      > using a plated potstill, made of copper, not a
      > fractionating column.
      >
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry
      > Moderator
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      Cheers,
      Rob.




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    • Harry
      ... wrote: site? ;-)) ) ... Why, thank ye Sir! tis my humble attempt to give something back to the hobby. ;) ... Using fresh pomace does indeed solve the
      Message 2 of 21 , Nov 29, 2005
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@y...>
        wrote:
        site? ;-)) )
        >
        > yup, great resource (shame it doesn't get looked at
        > enough).


        Why, thank ye Sir! 'tis my humble attempt to give something back to
        the hobby. ;)




        > Why bother with the bicarb? I thought the problem was
        > a corroding still, and that the product was fine.
        > If the icky still was caused by the rotten pomace,
        > then using fresh pomace solves the problem, without
        > needing bicarb, that could/will alter the flavour
        > profile and development.
        > Cheers,
        > Rob.



        Using fresh pomace does indeed solve the corrosion problem.
        However, as I and Professor Berglund both intimated, the fresh
        pomace needs to be brought to pH 3 to inhibit spoilage bacterial
        growth, until the mash is ready to run. This obviates the need to
        raise the pH at some stage to neutralise any residual acidity. It
        cannot be done in the first distillation as it will produce the well-
        known blue distillate. Therefore it should be done in the second
        distillation, to reduce residual acidity. This of course is not a
        problem in a fractionating column, as the distillate product is
        virtually neutral, pH wise. However it is a concern in a potstill,
        where the whole object of the exercise is to introduce SOME of the
        tails as flavouring. These tails are quite acidic, and need to be
        tempered somewhat, if you value your intestines. Check the tails
        with a litmus paper, you'll see what I mean.


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
        Moderator
      • Robert Thomas
        ... obviates? surely necessitates ... okey dokey, point taken. Cheers, Rob. Cheers, Rob. __________________________________ Yahoo! Music Unlimited Access over
        Message 3 of 21 , Nov 29, 2005
          --- Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
          > <whosbrewing@y...>
          > wrote:
          > site? ;-)) )
          > >
          > > yup, great resource (shame it doesn't get looked
          > at
          > > enough).
          >
          >
          > Why, thank ye Sir! 'tis my humble attempt to give
          > something back to
          > the hobby. ;)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > > Why bother with the bicarb? I thought the problem
          > was
          > > a corroding still, and that the product was fine.
          > > If the icky still was caused by the rotten pomace,
          > > then using fresh pomace solves the problem,
          > without
          > > needing bicarb, that could/will alter the flavour
          > > profile and development.
          > > Cheers,
          > > Rob.
          >
          >
          >
          > Using fresh pomace does indeed solve the corrosion
          > problem.
          > However, as I and Professor Berglund both intimated,
          > the fresh
          > pomace needs to be brought to pH 3 to inhibit
          > spoilage bacterial
          > growth, until the mash is ready to run. This
          > obviates the need to

          obviates? surely necessitates

          > raise the pH at some stage to neutralise any
          > residual acidity. It
          > cannot be done in the first distillation as it will
          > produce the well-
          > known blue distillate. Therefore it should be done
          > in the second
          > distillation, to reduce residual acidity. This of
          > course is not a
          > problem in a fractionating column, as the distillate
          > product is
          > virtually neutral, pH wise. However it is a
          > concern in a potstill,
          > where the whole object of the exercise is to
          > introduce SOME of the
          > tails as flavouring. These tails are quite acidic,
          > and need to be
          > tempered somewhat, if you value your intestines.
          > Check the tails
          > with a litmus paper, you'll see what I mean.

          okey dokey, point taken.
          Cheers,
          Rob.



          Cheers,
          Rob.



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