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Rough guide to quantity

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  • waljaco@hotmail.com
    Ideally, you should measure S.G. and pH levels with instruments. For home distilling this is not always necessary. I have collected some rough figures which I
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
      Ideally, you should measure S.G. and pH levels with instruments. For
      home distilling this is not always necessary. I have collected some
      rough figures which I find a useful guide to create recipes.

      SUGAR. Wine yeast can use no more than 2.5lbs of sugar/1imp gal or
      2.2lb/1U.S.gal or 1.25kg/5litres of must. This will produce 14%a.b.v.
      Honey and liquid malt extract are 80% sugar so you need 1.5kg/5l must
      or mash.
      Molasses is 50% sugar so you need 2.5kg/5l must or mash.
      Maple syrup is 32% sugar.
      Carob beans are 45% sugar.
      Sugar beets are 15% sugar
      Grain malt is 60% sugar (starch converted to sugars) so you need
      1.5kg/5l mash.
      Cooked grain contains 60% convertible starch so you need 1.5kg/5l mash
      Raisins contain 60% sugar. To reconstitute a fresh grape must, use
      2kg of sultanas/5l water.

      FRUIT. Most grapes have the ideal sugar (20%), water, acid content,
      and we can use it as a basis for other fruits. 8kg of fresh grapes
      produce 5litres of wine.
      Most common fruits (apples, plums, apricots, peaches) contain 10%
      sugar and 0.6% acid. Cherries and figs are 15% sugar and bananas are
      20% sugar.
      A 5l fruit mash could then be 4kg fruit (400g sugar content), 4l
      water (there is already 20% water in the fruit) and 800g additional
      sugar. For cherries and figs add 600g sugar.
      A banana mash could be 4kg cooked bananas (800g sugar content), 400g
      sugar, 4l water. Bananas have only 0.3% acid, so additional acid
      would be useful - 3lemons for the 5l mash.

      ACID. A pH of 5 is ideal for a distilling mash. This equates to 3g
      acid/litre of water or 0.5tsp citric acid or 1 lemon/litre water.
      The acid content of the above fruits is approx. 0.6%. An additional
      equal weight of water dilutes the natural acid to the ideal pH of 5.

      Wal
      P.S. Please correct errors.
    • AuntyEthyl
      Yello All, I have scoured all the groups messages, but came up with nothing. What in Comercial Bourbon creates the bubbles/foam/head when its mixed with
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 2, 2001
        Yello All,

        I have scoured all the groups messages, but came up
        with nothing.

        What in Comercial Bourbon creates the
        bubbles/foam/head when its mixed with Coke(tm) and how
        can you get this effect with a Home Distilled product.

        If presentation is 50% my bourbon, even with the help
        of Wal et al, is still lacking.

        AuntyEthyl

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      • AuntyEthyl
        Thanx Yet again Wal for excellent content. Just my 2 bits. Around my parts the Water Board likes to keep its water really alkaline ie: about 8.2 pH. Well after
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 2, 2001
          Thanx Yet again Wal for excellent content.

          Just my 2 bits.

          Around my parts the Water Board likes to keep its
          water really alkaline ie: about 8.2 pH.

          Well after a couple of Slow starting/sluggish washes
          using quality Turbo's, even tho I have brewed a bit of
          Beer and Wine, I came to the realisation that I needed
          to add some acid to my wash to keep the yeasties
          happy.
          I don't actually have a pH meter, and I incorrectly
          assumed the Turbo would have all it needs for a happy
          ferment. But, of course, the only thing they can't
          allow for in the Turbo is what your water pH is.

          So I added approx 1 Tablespoon of Citric Acid to a
          25l/6Gal wash and presto... extremely happy yeasties
          and fermetation. Works extremely well for my water.

          AuntyEthyl

          --- waljaco@... wrote:
          > Ideally, you should measure S.G. and pH levels with
          > instruments. For
          > home distilling this is not always necessary. I have
          > collected some
          > rough figures which I find a useful guide to create
          > recipes.
          >
          > SUGAR. Wine yeast can use no more than 2.5lbs of
          > sugar/1imp gal or
          > 2.2lb/1U.S.gal or 1.25kg/5litres of must. This will
          > produce 14%a.b.v.
          > Honey and liquid malt extract are 80% sugar so you
          > need 1.5kg/5l must
          > or mash.
          > Molasses is 50% sugar so you need 2.5kg/5l must or
          > mash.
          > Maple syrup is 32% sugar.
          > Carob beans are 45% sugar.
          > Sugar beets are 15% sugar
          > Grain malt is 60% sugar (starch converted to sugars)
          > so you need
          > 1.5kg/5l mash.
          > Cooked grain contains 60% convertible starch so you
          > need 1.5kg/5l mash
          > Raisins contain 60% sugar. To reconstitute a fresh
          > grape must, use
          > 2kg of sultanas/5l water.
          >
          > FRUIT. Most grapes have the ideal sugar (20%),
          > water, acid content,
          > and we can use it as a basis for other fruits. 8kg
          > of fresh grapes
          > produce 5litres of wine.
          > Most common fruits (apples, plums, apricots,
          > peaches) contain 10%
          > sugar and 0.6% acid. Cherries and figs are 15% sugar
          > and bananas are
          > 20% sugar.
          > A 5l fruit mash could then be 4kg fruit (400g sugar
          > content), 4l
          > water (there is already 20% water in the fruit) and
          > 800g additional
          > sugar. For cherries and figs add 600g sugar.
          > A banana mash could be 4kg cooked bananas (800g
          > sugar content), 400g
          > sugar, 4l water. Bananas have only 0.3% acid, so
          > additional acid
          > would be useful - 3lemons for the 5l mash.
          >
          > ACID. A pH of 5 is ideal for a distilling mash. This
          > equates to 3g
          > acid/litre of water or 0.5tsp citric acid or 1
          > lemon/litre water.
          > The acid content of the above fruits is approx.
          > 0.6%. An additional
          > equal weight of water dilutes the natural acid to
          > the ideal pH of 5.
          >
          > Wal
          > P.S. Please correct errors.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


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        • G&N
          I cant answer your question but it is something that i have always wondered about myself so i look foward to an answer to your question!!! Glenn ... From:
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 3, 2001
            I cant answer your question but it is something that i have always wondered
            about myself so i look foward to an answer to your question!!!


            Glenn
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "AuntyEthyl" <auntyethyl@...>
            To: <waljaco@...>; <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, October 03, 2001 7:29 AM
            Subject: [Distillers] Bourbon Bubbles


            > Yello All,
            >
            > I have scoured all the groups messages, but came up
            > with nothing.
            >
            > What in Comercial Bourbon creates the
            > bubbles/foam/head when its mixed with Coke(tm) and how
            > can you get this effect with a Home Distilled product.
            >
            > If presentation is 50% my bourbon, even with the help
            > of Wal et al, is still lacking.
            >
            > AuntyEthyl
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Listen to your Yahoo! Mail messages from any phone.
            > http://phone.yahoo.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • topcat@southcom.com.au
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 3, 2001
            • AuntyEthyl
              Further to Wal s excellent info, the following link is an excellent resource for sugar and acid content of various types of fruit.
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 3, 2001
                Further to Wal's excellent info,
                the following link is an excellent resource for sugar
                and acid content of various types of fruit.

                http://hbd.org/brewery/library/SugAcid.html

                AuntyEthyl

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              • AuntyEthyl
                Hi All, Thanx for the replies so far, but as yet, I m not sure if I have the answer. Some suggestions were ... I took this as disolved sugar in the spirit, and
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 3, 2001
                  Hi All,

                  Thanx for the replies so far, but as yet, I'm not sure
                  if I have the answer.

                  Some suggestions were
                  > Sugar content of comercial Bourbon.

                  I took this as disolved sugar in the spirit, and as
                  this would be easy to test I will give it a try and
                  let you all know.
                  I have noticed that some bourbons do taste somewhat
                  sweet. However I think it would be hard for the small
                  sugar content of the bourbon to compete against the
                  large sugar content of the mixer.

                  > Sugar content releasing CO2 and causing foam. ie:
                  drop a tsp of sugar into Coke.

                  This one I think has more to do with providing
                  "nucleation sites" for the CO2 to escape. As in the
                  rough edges of the undisolved sugar crystals allow the
                  CO2 to escape out of solution easier. The same effect
                  can be seen with a tsp of salt or sand.. etc.

                  In Beer there is an compound that actually binds the
                  bubbles together to form the head. And recently
                  scientist have gentically modified beer yeast to
                  create more of this compound during fermentation.

                  So I guess I'm wondering..
                  could it be a byproduct of aging in oak barrels?
                  is it a compound found in corn, and we don't see it
                  cos we mostly use sugar.?

                  Have thse who have made a corn wash noticed bubbles in
                  there bourbon when mixing with coke, as oppposed to
                  bourbon made with a sugar wash and flavoring.

                  Thanx again to those whom replied. All input is
                  appreciated.

                  Still in Wonder

                  AuntyEthyl



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                • Tom Cormack
                  I was thinking about the CO2 aspect and wonder if the bubbles in commercial bourbon only occur when coke is added by postmix machines or from the bottle as
                  Message 8 of 11 , Oct 3, 2001
                    I was thinking about the CO2 aspect and wonder if the bubbles in commercial
                    bourbon only occur when coke is added by postmix machines or from the bottle
                    as well - I to am now perplexed by this revelation

                    Tom
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "AuntyEthyl" <auntyethyl@...>
                    To: <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2001 12:26 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Distillers] Bourbon Bubbles


                    > Hi All,
                    >
                    > Thanx for the replies so far, but as yet, I'm not sure
                    > if I have the answer.
                    >
                    > Some suggestions were
                    > > Sugar content of comercial Bourbon.
                    >
                    > I took this as disolved sugar in the spirit, and as
                    > this would be easy to test I will give it a try and
                    > let you all know.
                    > I have noticed that some bourbons do taste somewhat
                    > sweet. However I think it would be hard for the small
                    > sugar content of the bourbon to compete against the
                    > large sugar content of the mixer.
                    >
                    > > Sugar content releasing CO2 and causing foam. ie:
                    > drop a tsp of sugar into Coke.
                    >
                    > This one I think has more to do with providing
                    > "nucleation sites" for the CO2 to escape. As in the
                    > rough edges of the undisolved sugar crystals allow the
                    > CO2 to escape out of solution easier. The same effect
                    > can be seen with a tsp of salt or sand.. etc.
                    >
                    > In Beer there is an compound that actually binds the
                    > bubbles together to form the head. And recently
                    > scientist have gentically modified beer yeast to
                    > create more of this compound during fermentation.
                    >
                    > So I guess I'm wondering..
                    > could it be a byproduct of aging in oak barrels?
                    > is it a compound found in corn, and we don't see it
                    > cos we mostly use sugar.?
                    >
                    > Have thse who have made a corn wash noticed bubbles in
                    > there bourbon when mixing with coke, as oppposed to
                    > bourbon made with a sugar wash and flavoring.
                    >
                    > Thanx again to those whom replied. All input is
                    > appreciated.
                    >
                    > Still in Wonder
                    >
                    > AuntyEthyl
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________________________
                    > Do You Yahoo!?
                    > NEW from Yahoo! GeoCities - quick and easy web site hosting, just
                    $8.95/month.
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                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
                    There might also be something modifying the surface tension, and hence changing the amount of energy required for the bubbles to form Tony
                    Message 9 of 11 , Oct 3, 2001
                      There might also be something modifying the surface tension, and hence
                      changing the amount of energy required for the bubbles to form

                      Tony
                    • AuntyEthyl
                      Hi Tom, I m fairly sure that the bubbles occur both with post mix and bottled varieties of cola. Its an old bartenders trick in remebering which of the four
                      Message 10 of 11 , Oct 3, 2001
                        Hi Tom,

                        I'm fairly sure that the bubbles occur both with post
                        mix and bottled varieties of cola.

                        Its an old bartenders trick in remebering which of the
                        four coke mixed drinks was the bourbon. There's that
                        slight ring of foam around the edge of the fluid
                        level.
                        Doesn't happen with scotch, brandy etc.

                        Which probably means it has something to do with the
                        corn.?

                        Tony may be onto something with the comment re:
                        changes to the surface tension.

                        Also Perplexed
                        AuntyEthyl

                        --- Tom Cormack <tcormack@...> wrote:
                        > I was thinking about the CO2 aspect and wonder if
                        > the bubbles in commercial
                        > bourbon only occur when coke is added by postmix
                        > machines or from the bottle
                        > as well - I to am now perplexed by this revelation
                        >
                        > Tom



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                      • G&N
                        I mixed put a teaspoon of sugar in an essence based bourbon to try and modify the flavour and it to gave a foam type of rection to the drink so maybe it is
                        Message 11 of 11 , Oct 4, 2001
                          I mixed put a teaspoon of sugar in an essence based bourbon to try and
                          modify the flavour and it to gave a foam type of rection to the drink so
                          maybe it is sugar that is in commecial based bourbon.

                          Glenn
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "AuntyEthyl" <auntyethyl@...>
                          To: "Tom Cormack" <tcormack@...>; "Distiller's Group"
                          <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2001 10:29 AM
                          Subject: Re: [Distillers] Bourbon Bubbles


                          > Hi Tom,
                          >
                          > I'm fairly sure that the bubbles occur both with post
                          > mix and bottled varieties of cola.
                          >
                          > Its an old bartenders trick in remebering which of the
                          > four coke mixed drinks was the bourbon. There's that
                          > slight ring of foam around the edge of the fluid
                          > level.
                          > Doesn't happen with scotch, brandy etc.
                          >
                          > Which probably means it has something to do with the
                          > corn.?
                          >
                          > Tony may be onto something with the comment re:
                          > changes to the surface tension.
                          >
                          > Also Perplexed
                          > AuntyEthyl
                          >
                          > --- Tom Cormack <tcormack@...> wrote:
                          > > I was thinking about the CO2 aspect and wonder if
                          > > the bubbles in commercial
                          > > bourbon only occur when coke is added by postmix
                          > > machines or from the bottle
                          > > as well - I to am now perplexed by this revelation
                          > >
                          > > Tom
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > __________________________________________________
                          > Do You Yahoo!?
                          > NEW from Yahoo! GeoCities - quick and easy web site hosting, just
                          $8.95/month.
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                          >
                          >
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                          >
                          >
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