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Column pressure

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  • project880
    I am now building a new still and i am wondering about one thing. My first column is designed in the offset style reflux condencing, L shape or cactus
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 2, 2005
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      I am now building a new still and i am wondering about one thing. My
      first column is designed in the offset style reflux condencing, "L
      shape or cactus design". The cooling part, the vertical one, is
      effective enough so the vapor become condenced around the middle of
      it heights. At the top of the vertical part is a hole so actually
      the reflux head is vented resulting in that above the packing in the
      column is only the atmospheric pressure, and the temp in the column
      top is constant 78.2 - 78.4 C

      Now i am building a larger system and the reflux head will be
      different so the vapor will be condensed to a small pool at the
      bottom and then lead back to the column top through a special pipe.

      Then we are coming to the point. I am not sure that it will be
      possible to have the head vented, resulting in possible pressure in
      the top of the column. The question is: On which way does that
      affect the vapor temperature for the pure ethanol? Does i have to
      calculate the vapor temp in relation to the pressure reading from a
      gauge, if any, to know which purity i am working with at the top?

      Thanks,

      HG
    • Robert Thomas
      The way I understand your description is that there is vapor access into the condenser section, and liquid return via a separate (lower?) pipe. So far so good.
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 2, 2005
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        The way I understand your description is that there is
        vapor access into the condenser section, and liquid
        return via a separate (lower?) pipe. So far so good.
        What I can't understand is why you cannot vent to the
        atmosphere (unless you are feeding vapor in from above
        the cooling coils).
        With no venting, you will indeed have a pressure build
        up.... right until you start traking off product: then
        you will have a jet of superheated ethanol vapor
        shooting out.
        Think again about not venting.
        Cheers,
        Rob.


        --- project880 <project880@...> wrote:

        >
        > I am now building a new still and i am wondering
        > about one thing. My
        > first column is designed in the offset style reflux
        > condencing, "L
        > shape or cactus design". The cooling part, the
        > vertical one, is
        > effective enough so the vapor become condenced
        > around the middle of
        > it heights. At the top of the vertical part is a
        > hole so actually
        > the reflux head is vented resulting in that above
        > the packing in the
        > column is only the atmospheric pressure, and the
        > temp in the column
        > top is constant 78.2 - 78.4 C
        >
        > Now i am building a larger system and the reflux
        > head will be
        > different so the vapor will be condensed to a small
        > pool at the
        > bottom and then lead back to the column top through
        > a special pipe.
        >
        > Then we are coming to the point. I am not sure that
        > it will be
        > possible to have the head vented, resulting in
        > possible pressure in
        > the top of the column. The question is: On which way
        > does that
        > affect the vapor temperature for the pure ethanol?
        > Does i have to
        > calculate the vapor temp in relation to the pressure
        > reading from a
        > gauge, if any, to know which purity i am working
        > with at the top?
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > HG
        >
        >
        >
        >


        Cheers,
        Rob.



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      • _{*L*}_
        Without a drawing or sketch it is almost Hit or Miss situation with the answer. If you want an intelligent answer please post a drawing. Re-reading your post
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 2, 2005
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          Without a drawing or sketch it is almost "Hit or Miss" situation with the answer. If you want an intelligent answer please post a drawing.
          Re-reading your post I might think you are building a closed system subject of internal pressure applied against this "liquid pool"...

          project880 <project880@...> wrote:
          Now i am building a larger system and the reflux head will be different so the vapor will be condensed to a small pool at the bottom and then lead back to the column top through a special pipe. Then we are coming to the point. I am not sure that it will be possible to have the head vented, resulting in possible pressure in the top of the column. The question is: On which way does that affect the vapor temperature for the pure ethanol? Does i have to calculate the vapor temp in relation to the pressure reading from a
          gauge, if any, to know which purity i am working with at the top?

          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! FareChase - Search multiple travel sites in one click.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mark
          ... I am not sure that it will be possible to have the head vented, resulting in possible pressure in the top of the column. jeez. hope you don t live next
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 4, 2005
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            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "project880" <project880@y...>
            wrote:
            >
            >
            I am not sure that it will be possible to have the head vented,
            resulting in possible pressure in the top of the column.


            jeez. hope you don't live next door to me. ka-boom.
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