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Grappa, tsikoudia, raki, fresh brandy, is there a difference in taste?

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  • georomios
    Hello to Mico and others who have been involved in the discussion on grappa. Sorry but I have been away from a computer for more than a week and I have missed
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2005
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      Hello to Mico and others who have been involved in the discussion on
      grappa. Sorry but I have been away from a computer for more than a
      week and I have missed out the opportunity to participating in the
      discussion. Nevertheless I thought of posting my experiences to
      date with the production of grappa or near grappa / brandy like
      drink.

      I was prompted to the production of spirit out of grapes from my
      experience of drinking the Cretan spirit tsikoudia, made out of
      pomace (raki but without the aniseed flavour, similar to that
      produced on some other Greek islands) and more recently from
      drinking grappa while for a month in Tuscany, following long
      sessions with Chianti Classicos, it was great finishing the night
      with a few drinks of grappa.

      On my return and having put together a simple distillation apparatus
      based on a 30 lt hot water urn, not reflux, just plain alambric type
      of set up, I bought a couple of cases of syrah/shiraz grapes, de-
      stemmed them (to avoid the bitter/sharp taste in the spirit) and
      after fermentation I distilled the whole mix of grape juice, skins,
      pips, the lot in two batches. This was my first ever try and
      without a voltage regulator it was a bit of a hit and miss regarding
      the avoidance of tails. I watered down the mix to 40% by volume, it
      got a bit cloudy (no soft water supply available) I put it in the
      freezer for a few days, filtered it through coffee filters and
      finished with about 6 lt of 40% drink!

      How does it taste? I have had two blind tasting sessions comparing
      my stuff with Cretan tsikoudia (no brand tsikoudia bought bulk from
      the barrel in Crete, everybody buys it like that, for 4.50 euros per
      lt)) and Italian grappa bought in Milano airport duty free
      (Candolini Grappa Bianca 1 lt for 12 euros). Results? Hardly any
      difference in taste. Preference from participants: First session
      Grappa, mine, tsikoudia! Second session, mine, tsikoudia, grappa!
      In other words, nobody can tell the difference after a nice meal and
      a few glasses of red!

      I am very pleased with myself and I am looking forward to my next
      season's production. I will keep some of the three above spirits
      and have a blind tasting between my next season's effort and the
      other three. But in the meanwhile I would appreciate hearing other
      people's view about differences in taste between
      grappa/tsikoudia/raki (no aniseed) and spirit out of grapes, say
      unaged brandy out of the bottle, not barrel aged.

      Happy drinking

      Geo
    • Robert Thomas
      ... ... tsikoudia= greek root to the word, raki (pronounced rad-she by Cretans)=Turkish root. There is no difference. The Cretans are very pragmatic
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 1, 2005
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        --- georomios <georomios@...> wrote:
        <snip>
        > other three. But in the meanwhile I would
        > appreciate hearing other
        > people's view about differences in taste between
        > grappa/tsikoudia/raki (no aniseed) and spirit out of
        > grapes, say
        > unaged brandy out of the bottle, not barrel aged.
        tsikoudia= greek root to the word,
        raki (pronounced rad-she by Cretans)=Turkish root.
        There is no difference. The Cretans are very pragmatic
        about raki. If you distilled from some kind of grape
        base, and added nothing after, then it's raki. They
        also do similar with mulberries (whose name I can't
        remember). This stuff is VERY rare.
        Cheers,
        Rob.


        Cheers,
        Rob.



        __________________________________
        Start your day with Yahoo! - Make it your home page!
        http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
      • waljaco
        Mulberry vodka is popular in the Caucus Mountains where it is known as tut araghi (Azerbaijan) and tutti oghi (Armenia). The etymology of araghi is
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 1, 2005
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          Mulberry 'vodka' is popular in the Caucus Mountains where it is known
          as 'tut araghi'(Azerbaijan) and 'tutti oghi' (Armenia). The etymology
          of araghi is obviously from arak/raki.
          wal
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@y...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- georomios <georomios@h...> wrote:
          > <snip>
          > > other three. But in the meanwhile I would
          > > appreciate hearing other
          > > people's view about differences in taste between
          > > grappa/tsikoudia/raki (no aniseed) and spirit out of
          > > grapes, say
          > > unaged brandy out of the bottle, not barrel aged.
          > tsikoudia= greek root to the word,
          > raki (pronounced rad-she by Cretans)=Turkish root.
          > There is no difference. The Cretans are very pragmatic
          > about raki. If you distilled from some kind of grape
          > base, and added nothing after, then it's raki. They
          > also do similar with mulberries (whose name I can't
          > remember). This stuff is VERY rare.
          > Cheers,
          > Rob.
          >
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Rob.
          >
          >
          >
          > __________________________________
          > Start your day with Yahoo! - Make it your home page!
          > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
          >
        • king pin
          You should be pleased with your results Geo. I have only tried Raki on one occasion and it had aniseed, (a taste that I would have prefered out of the drink).
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 1, 2005
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            You should be pleased with your results Geo. I have only tried Raki on one occasion and it had aniseed, (a taste that I would have prefered out of the drink). I do beleive all 3 varieties do use grapes, so they really can't be that dif in taste...initially, then of course, aging in barrels and other ingredients will change the base.

            I'm sorry I can't be more helpful in regard to your Q's. I was once brought a bottle of Grappa di Mertillio from northern Italy, which I think translates to Blueberry Grappa and it was simply amazing! I wouldn't mind trying to make it one day but I shudder when I think of the amount of berries needed to make it worthwhile.

            georomios <georomios@...> wrote:
            Hello to Mico and others who have been involved in the discussion on
            grappa. Sorry but I have been away from a computer for more than a
            week and I have missed out the opportunity to participating in the
            discussion. Nevertheless I thought of posting my experiences to
            date with the production of grappa or near grappa / brandy like
            drink.

            I was prompted to the production of spirit out of grapes from my
            experience of drinking the Cretan spirit tsikoudia, made out of
            pomace (raki but without the aniseed flavour, similar to that
            produced on some other Greek islands) and more recently from
            drinking grappa while for a month in Tuscany, following long
            sessions with Chianti Classicos, it was great finishing the night
            with a few drinks of grappa.

            On my return and having put together a simple distillation apparatus
            based on a 30 lt hot water urn, not reflux, just plain alambric type
            of set up, I bought a couple of cases of syrah/shiraz grapes, de-
            stemmed them (to avoid the bitter/sharp taste in the spirit) and
            after fermentation I distilled the whole mix of grape juice, skins,
            pips, the lot in two batches. This was my first ever try and
            without a voltage regulator it was a bit of a hit and miss regarding
            the avoidance of tails. I watered down the mix to 40% by volume, it
            got a bit cloudy (no soft water supply available) I put it in the
            freezer for a few days, filtered it through coffee filters and
            finished with about 6 lt of 40% drink!

            How does it taste? I have had two blind tasting sessions comparing
            my stuff with Cretan tsikoudia (no brand tsikoudia bought bulk from
            the barrel in Crete, everybody buys it like that, for 4.50 euros per
            lt)) and Italian grappa bought in Milano airport duty free
            (Candolini Grappa Bianca 1 lt for 12 euros). Results? Hardly any
            difference in taste. Preference from participants: First session
            Grappa, mine, tsikoudia! Second session, mine, tsikoudia, grappa!
            In other words, nobody can tell the difference after a nice meal and
            a few glasses of red!

            I am very pleased with myself and I am looking forward to my next
            season's production. I will keep some of the three above spirits
            and have a blind tasting between my next season's effort and the
            other three. But in the meanwhile I would appreciate hearing other
            people's view about differences in taste between
            grappa/tsikoudia/raki (no aniseed) and spirit out of grapes, say
            unaged brandy out of the bottle, not barrel aged.

            Happy drinking

            Geo






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          • waljaco
            Turkish raki is commonly made from a raisin mash. In Greece currants (name derived from Corinth) are used to make a base spirit. So you can make a grape-based
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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              Turkish raki is commonly made from a raisin mash. In Greece currants
              (name derived from Corinth) are used to make a base spirit.
              So you can make a grape-based spirit anytime of the year.
              wal
              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, king pin <kingpin_kingpin2001@y...>
              wrote:
              >
              > You should be pleased with your results Geo. I have only tried Raki
              on one occasion and it had aniseed, (a taste that I would have
              prefered out of the drink). I do beleive all 3 varieties do use
              grapes, so they really can't be that dif in taste...initially, then of
              course, aging in barrels and other ingredients will change the base.
              >
              > I'm sorry I can't be more helpful in regard to your Q's. I was once
              brought a bottle of Grappa di Mertillio from northern Italy, which I
              think translates to Blueberry Grappa and it was simply amazing! I
              wouldn't mind trying to make it one day but I shudder when I think of
              the amount of berries needed to make it worthwhile.
              >

              >
              > Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
              > FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org
              >
              >
              >
              > SPONSORED LINKS
              > Management team building Corporate culture Corporate culture change
              Business culture of china Corporate culture training Management team
              >
              > ---------------------------------
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              >
              >
              > Visit your group "Distillers" on the web.
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              Service.
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              >
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