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Urea in nutrient

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  • topkiwi@ihug.co.nz
    Hello to all group members. It is good to see that the group is continuing to flourishing and stimulating discussion on the subject of distillation. I have
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 28, 2001
      Hello to all group members. It is good to see that the group is
      continuing to flourishing and stimulating discussion on the subject
      of distillation. I have been very busy with the business and not had
      the time to devote to the group but I get all the digests. I would
      like to take the opportunity to thank Tony for looking after the
      group and keeping it going well, thanks Tony.

      Anyway, I see that the age old subject of urea as an ingredient in
      nutrient has risen like a phoenix again. I would like to put this to
      rest once and for all, as some of the members know, I did a lot of
      research on this when it first came to light in 1997.
      I believe the issue was initially raised more to score political
      points than as a genuine concern for the law in New Zealand or
      peoples health - but that is another issue.

      According to 'The Food Regulations 1984, Amendment No. 5' dated 2nd
      December 1991 regulation 235, General alcoholic drinks, subclause 3
      says "General alcoholic drinks may contain any of the following:",
      paragraph (i) "Yeast nutrients, except urea"

      Which is what has been quoted in past correspondence and always
      referred to when discussing the issue, however:
      'The Food Regulations 1984, Amendment No. 9' dated 10th of October
      1994 regulation 101, (3) states "Regulation 235 of the principal
      regulations is hereby further amended by revoking paragraph (i) of
      subclause (3)." ie the exception to urea above is now revoked.

      On seeing this I contacted the New Zealand Health Department and
      requested, under the Official Information Act, all the paper work as
      to why the original banning and why the lifting of that ban.
      Of course, I got screeds of paper but the story is that the ban was
      instigated because of research done in England that pointed health
      risks of urea as an ingredient for fermentation. Thus it was banned.
      It was later realised that although these chemicals were present in
      the fermented wash, they were not present once the wash had been
      distilled. It appears that they are not carried over in the
      distillation process, thus the ban for this type of alcoholic product
      was lifted.

      I hope this all helps to clear the matter especially for those
      overseas members who may be questioning the ingredients in their
      present yeast.

      Young Des
      topkiwi
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