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alkaline hydrolysis of ethyl acetate

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  • mwmccaw
    The reaction speed and completeness is a function of the strength and concentration of the base used. Sodium hydroxide is a Strong base, sodium bicarbonate is
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 2 7:14 AM
      The reaction speed and completeness is a function of the strength and
      concentration of the base used.
      Sodium hydroxide is a Strong base, sodium bicarbonate is a weak base.
      Comparing their rates would be like comparing a Ferrari to a go-kart.

      We probably all have different tolerance levels for ethyl acetate
      smell in product, too, and so will report different results.

      I know that putting enough sodium bicarbonate into strippate that some
      doesn't dissolve, and letting it sit a couple of weeks in a dark
      corner makes a huge difference. In my experience, chucking it in
      right before heatup makes less of one. Of course, how rapidly you
      heat up and how much you put in will also make a difference.

      The real takehome lesson is that it works - so do it in the way that
      is easiest and most convenient to your schedule.

      It was reported a couple of weeks ago that mussel shells do the same
      thing. Calcium carbonate (bivalve shells, chalk, etc.) would be
      preferable as an additive for a variety of reasons. It would be
      really useful if some of us could do a split batch and compare the
      treatments directly.

      Cheers,
      Mike McCaw
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