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Re: caramel booze

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  • pfcslr
    ... Knarl, Carmelization is one thing home brewersare careful to avoid when using DME, LME, or beer kits containing these products, the carmelized sugars are
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 1, 2005
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, dearknarl <dearknarl@g...> wrote:
      > Gday Guys,
      >
      > > Has anyone tried to make a wash with caramel in it?

      > Cheers,
      > knarl.
      >
      >
      Knarl,

      Carmelization is one thing home brewersare careful to avoid when
      using DME, LME, or beer kits containing these products, the carmelized
      sugars are unfermentable. I would assume the same of all sugars. But I
      may be mistaken!

      Good luck,
      pfcslr
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dearknarl
      I assumed that caramel was still mainly sucrose (inverted?), some of it having changed into esters, colour compounds and other stuff. Is that right? Because it
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 2, 2005
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        I assumed that caramel was still mainly sucrose (inverted?), some of it
        having changed into esters, colour compounds and other stuff. Is that right?
        Because it wouldn't really matter if some of the sugar became unfermentable,
        as long as the majority of it was still fermentable. Just add a little more.

        Cheers,
        knarl.

        Knarl,
        >
        > Carmelization is one thing home brewersare careful to avoid when
        > using DME, LME, or beer kits containing these products, the carmelized
        > sugars are unfermentable. I would assume the same of all sugars. But I
        > may be mistaken!
        >
        > Good luck,
        > pfcslr
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • pfcslr
        I was mainly rembering a batch of amber ale that my sister compaired to DR Pepper with a low ABV. However Edison returned to carbon filiments for the light
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 2, 2005
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          I was mainly rembering a batch of amber ale that my sister compaired
          to DR Pepper with a low ABV. However Edison returned to carbon
          filiments for the light bulb after disreguarding it and testing
          several hundred different options; if I am not completely mistaken!
          If it works out please pass on the details.

          May the spirits be with you!,
          pfcslr

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, dearknarl <dearknarl@g...> wrote:
          > I assumed that caramel was still mainly sucrose (inverted?), some
          of it
          > having changed into esters, colour compounds and other stuff. Is
          that right?
          > Because it wouldn't really matter if some of the sugar became
          unfermentable,
          > as long as the majority of it was still fermentable. Just add a
          little more.
          >
          > Cheers,
          > knarl.
          >
          > Knarl,
          > >
          > > Carmelization is one thing home brewersare careful to avoid when
          > > using DME, LME, or beer kits containing these products, the
          carmelized
          > > sugars are unfermentable. I would assume the same of all sugars.
          But I
          > > may be mistaken!
          > >
          > > Good luck,
          > > pfcslr
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • waljaco
          Toast (burnt bread) was sometimes added for flavouring. Most people who burn their grain wash on electic elements are not pleased with the resulting flavour!
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 6, 2005
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            Toast (burnt bread) was sometimes added for flavouring. Most people
            who burn their grain wash on electic elements are not pleased with the
            resulting flavour!
            Normally caramel (burnt sugar) is added to brandy, rum and sometimes
            whisky after, as it also gives colour. Your molasses contains
            naturally caramelised sugars from the refining process anyway.
            wal
            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, dearknarl <dearknarl@g...> wrote:
            > Gday Guys,
            >
            > Just had a thought when I was making some caramel to put in my rum.
            >
            > Has anyone tried to make a wash with caramel in it? I was thinking just
            > caramelise a few kg in a sugar wash, or maybe caramalise the sugar in a
            > 50:50 sugar molasses rum wash. Think it would change the flavour
            much? For
            > that matter, think it would change the flavour for the better?
            >
            > Cheers,
            > knarl.
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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