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Basarana

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  • Tony Ackland
    I recently had a question re Basarana. Can anyone (Wal ?) help Sacha out ? ***************************** Dear Tony I thought you might like to know of a
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 30, 2005
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      I recently had a question re Basarana. Can anyone (Wal ?) help Sacha
      out ?

      *****************************
      Dear Tony

      I thought you might like to know of a traditional Basque recipe
      for "Basarana" (literally "wild plum"), also known as patxaran. It's a
      liqueur made from sloes - about a third of the volume of your
      recipient, and sometimes a handful of blackberries to add colour,
      topped up and steeped for a couple of months in "anisado" - anise
      liqueur. Some people add vanilla pods, oranges and even a few coffee
      beans, but I think the sloes and blackberries are the basic
      traditional ingredients. Most people here on the northern side of the
      Basque country (in France) go to the other side (in Spain) to buy the
      anisado, but I'm interested in making my own, which is how I got onto
      your site in the first place. I'm still researching, but if you have
      any ideas or know any recipes for anisado, I'd love to know.
    • Harry
      ... Sacha ... It s a ... coffee ... the ... the ... onto ... have ... Anisado de Chinchón is a very popular aniseed-based drink produced in the town of the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 30, 2005
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Ackland"
        <Tony.Ackland@c...> wrote:
        > I recently had a question re Basarana. Can anyone (Wal ?) help
        Sacha
        > out ?
        >
        > *****************************
        > Dear Tony
        >
        > I thought you might like to know of a traditional Basque recipe
        > for "Basarana" (literally "wild plum"), also known as patxaran.
        It's a
        > liqueur made from sloes - about a third of the volume of your
        > recipient, and sometimes a handful of blackberries to add colour,
        > topped up and steeped for a couple of months in "anisado" - anise
        > liqueur. Some people add vanilla pods, oranges and even a few
        coffee
        > beans, but I think the sloes and blackberries are the basic
        > traditional ingredients. Most people here on the northern side of
        the
        > Basque country (in France) go to the other side (in Spain) to buy
        the
        > anisado, but I'm interested in making my own, which is how I got
        onto
        > your site in the first place. I'm still researching, but if you
        have
        > any ideas or know any recipes for anisado, I'd love to know.






        Anisado de Chinchón is a very popular aniseed-based drink produced
        in the town of the same name south of Madrid. Literally it's
        anisette schnapps.

        Anisette
        Generic term for anise-flavoured, absinthe-like liquors without the
        wormwood that's contained in authentic absinthes. Anisette is
        sweeter than most anise-flavoured liquors - such as pastis - and
        also has a lower alcohol content. The most famous brand is Marie
        Brizard, produced in France since 1750.

        Pastis
        Pastis is the generic term for very strong absinthe-like spirits
        produced in France. Often referred to as The National Drink of
        Provence or The Milk of Provence. Developed in Marseille in the
        Provence region of Southern France as a substitute for absinthe.
        Pastis does not contain wormwood. It's based on anise or star anise
        (badian) and liquorice as the principal ingredients.

        Each distillery has its own secret recipes and variations, and some
        brands contain more than seventy different herbs and spices. Well
        known brands are Pastis 51, Pernod, Ricard and Pastis Bleu.
        Pastis is usually mixed with water and served as an aperitif. Like
        absinthe, pastis becomes milky white and cloudy when water is added
        to it - also known as the louche.
        ----------------------------------------------

        Liquorice Schnapps:
        Recipe
        Use fresh, dried liquorice roots (sticks) of good quality.

        Direction:

        Wash a couple of roots well and leave them to dry on a piece of
        paper towel - in the shadow.

        Break them into smaller pieces and place them in a clean glass jar
        with tight-fitting lid.

        Cover with approx. 25 centiliter colourless, non-flavoured vodka -
        40% alcohol content (80 proof).

        Let steep for 1-7 days in a dark place at room temperature,
        18-20°C (64-68°F).
        Don't steep for more than a week, or you will extract some bad-
        tasting constituents that will spoil the pure liquorice taste.


        Shake lightly and taste it from time to time.

        Strain and filter your infusion into a clean glass bottle or jar
        with tight-fitting lid.

        Store (age) for at least 1 month in a dark place at room temperature
        before serving.
        If necessary, dilute your schnapps with the same type of vodka you
        used as base. Leave it a couple of days to settle.
        -----------------------------------------------------


        Star Anise Schnapps (Badian)

        Recipe
        Use fresh, dried star anise fruit pods.
        Star Anise (Badian) Botanical name: Illicium verum

        You can use ordinary anise (Pimpinella anisum), but star anise has a
        much more sophisticated flavour and is therefore more suitable for
        schnapps making.

        WARNING!
        Star Anise and Anise must NOT be confused with the POISONOUS
        Japanese Star Anise (Illicium anisatum - Illicium japonicum -
        Illicium lanceolatum - Illicium religiosum).


        Direction:

        Put 4-5 dried fruit pods in a clean glass jar with tight-fitting
        lid.

        Cover with 10 centiliter colourless, non-flavoured vodka - 40% (80
        proof).

        Let steep for 2-3 days in a dark place at room temperature,
        18-20°C (64-68°F).

        Shake lightly and taste it from time to time - it must not get
        bitter.

        Strain and filter your infusion into a clean glass bottle or jar
        with tight-fitting lid.

        Store (age) for at least 1 month in a dark place at room temperature
        before serving.
        If necessary, dilute the schnapps with the same type of vodka you
        used as base. Leave it a couple of days to settle.
        -----------------------------------------------------


        That's as much as I can find that may help to make Anisado. Wal can
        probably do it better.


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • Sven Pfitt
        Everything I have read about Absinthe and Pastis indicates that macerating the anise, Star Anise, fennel, etc and then distilling it produces a smoother
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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          Everything I have read about Absinthe and Pastis indicates that
          macerating the anise, Star Anise, fennel, etc and then distilling it
          produces a smoother rounder flavor. Star anise is recomended to be
          held to 5%, or less, of the total herb content.

          Do NOT USE CHINESE {11 point} Star Anise it is toxic.

          Sven

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Ackland"
          > <Tony.Ackland@c...> wrote:
          > > I recently had a question re Basarana. Can anyone (Wal ?) help
          > Sacha
          > > out ?
          > >
          > > *****************************
          > > Dear Tony
          > >
          > > I thought you might like to know of a traditional Basque recipe
          > > for "Basarana" (literally "wild plum"), also known as patxaran.
          > It's a
          > > liqueur made from sloes - about a third of the volume of your
          > > recipient, and sometimes a handful of blackberries to add colour,
          > > topped up and steeped for a couple of months in "anisado" - anise
          > > liqueur. Some people add vanilla pods, oranges and even a few
          > coffee
          > > beans, but I think the sloes and blackberries are the basic
          > > traditional ingredients. Most people here on the northern side of
          > the
          > > Basque country (in France) go to the other side (in Spain) to buy
          > the
          > > anisado, but I'm interested in making my own, which is how I got
          > onto
          > > your site in the first place. I'm still researching, but if you
          > have
          > > any ideas or know any recipes for anisado, I'd love to know.
          >
          ....snip.....
          >> That's as much as I can find that may help to make Anisado. Wal
          >can
          > probably do it better.
          >
          >
          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
        • waljaco
          Anisado is the Spanish version of an anise flavoured liqueur - look in Recipes of the Files (see left box) for arak, raki, ouzo, anisette. You will also find
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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            Anisado is the Spanish version of an anise flavoured liqueur - look in
            Recipes of the Files (see left box) for arak, raki, ouzo, anisette.
            You will also find Patxaran which is similar to Sloe gin but using an
            anise flavoured spirit as the base.
            wal
            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Ackland" <Tony.Ackland@c...>
            wrote:
            > I recently had a question re Basarana. Can anyone (Wal ?) help Sacha
            > out ?
            >
            > *****************************
            > Dear Tony
            >
            > I thought you might like to know of a traditional Basque recipe
            > for "Basarana" (literally "wild plum"), also known as patxaran. It's a
            > liqueur made from sloes - about a third of the volume of your
            > recipient, and sometimes a handful of blackberries to add colour,
            > topped up and steeped for a couple of months in "anisado" - anise
            > liqueur. Some people add vanilla pods, oranges and even a few coffee
            > beans, but I think the sloes and blackberries are the basic
            > traditional ingredients. Most people here on the northern side of the
            > Basque country (in France) go to the other side (in Spain) to buy the
            > anisado, but I'm interested in making my own, which is how I got onto
            > your site in the first place. I'm still researching, but if you have
            > any ideas or know any recipes for anisado, I'd love to know.
          • waljaco
            Chinese star anise is used as a replacement for Mediterranean (green) aniseed for economic reasons. It is not toxic according to the herbal literature. wal
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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              Chinese star anise is used as a replacement for Mediterranean (green)
              aniseed for economic reasons. It is not toxic according to the herbal
              literature.
              wal
              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Sven Pfitt" <the_gimp98@h...> wrote:
              > Everything I have read about Absinthe and Pastis indicates that
              > macerating the anise, Star Anise, fennel, etc and then distilling it
              > produces a smoother rounder flavor. Star anise is recomended to be
              > held to 5%, or less, of the total herb content.
              >
              > Do NOT USE CHINESE {11 point} Star Anise it is toxic.
              >
              > Sven
              >
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
              > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Ackland"
              > > <Tony.Ackland@c...> wrote:
              > > > I recently had a question re Basarana. Can anyone (Wal ?) help
              > > Sacha
              > > > out ?
              > > >
              > > > *****************************
              > > > Dear Tony
              > > >
              > > > I thought you might like to know of a traditional Basque recipe
              > > > for "Basarana" (literally "wild plum"), also known as patxaran.
              > > It's a
              > > > liqueur made from sloes - about a third of the volume of your
              > > > recipient, and sometimes a handful of blackberries to add colour,
              > > > topped up and steeped for a couple of months in "anisado" - anise
              > > > liqueur. Some people add vanilla pods, oranges and even a few
              > > coffee
              > > > beans, but I think the sloes and blackberries are the basic
              > > > traditional ingredients. Most people here on the northern side of
              > > the
              > > > Basque country (in France) go to the other side (in Spain) to buy
              > > the
              > > > anisado, but I'm interested in making my own, which is how I got
              > > onto
              > > > your site in the first place. I'm still researching, but if you
              > > have
              > > > any ideas or know any recipes for anisado, I'd love to know.
              > >
              > ....snip.....
              > >> That's as much as I can find that may help to make Anisado. Wal
              > >can
              > > probably do it better.
              > >
              > >
              > > Slainte!
              > > regards Harry
            • Harry
              ... (green) ... herbal ... wrote: ... Sven, I think you may be confusing CHINESE with JAPANESE. Star Anise (Badian) Botanical name: Illicium verum Star
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
                > Chinese star anise is used as a replacement for Mediterranean
                (green)
                > aniseed for economic reasons. It is not toxic according to the
                herbal
                > literature.
                > wal
                > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Sven Pfitt" <the_gimp98@h...>
                wrote:
                <snip>
                > >
                > > Do NOT USE CHINESE {11 point} Star Anise it is toxic.
                > >
                > > Sven


                Sven,
                I think you may be confusing CHINESE with JAPANESE.

                Star Anise (Badian)
                Botanical name: Illicium verum

                Star anise has properties very similar to anise (Pimpinella anisum),
                although they are not botanically related.
                The plant is native to the south-eastern part of China and to
                Vietnam and the dried fruits are widely used in Asian cooking.


                Star Anise and Anise must NOT be confused with the POISONOUS
                JAPANESE Star Anise (Illicium anisatum - Illicium japonicum -
                Illicium lanceolatum - Illicium religiosum).
                A closely related species, the Japanese star anise, contains
                sikimitoxin and is toxic. Once star anise has been dried and
                processed, it is not possible to visually distinguish between the
                Chinese and Japanese forms.



                Slainte!
                regards Harry
              • Sven Pfitt
                Yup, got them swapped. 11 pettles is japanese and is toxic. 6or7 pettles Chinese is not toxic. It is still possible to distinguish if you have whole star
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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                  Yup, got them swapped.

                  11 pettles is japanese and is toxic.

                  6or7 pettles Chinese is not toxic.

                  It is still possible to distinguish if you have whole star anise, but
                  not ground Star Anise which the article probably meant (It looks like
                  you hit the FDA site).

                  Sorry for the switch.

                  Thanks Harry for catching that.

                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
                  > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
                  > > Chinese star anise is used as a replacement for Mediterranean
                  > (green)
                  > > aniseed for economic reasons. It is not toxic according to the
                  > herbal
                  > > literature.
                  > > wal
                  > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Sven Pfitt" <the_gimp98@h...>
                  > wrote:
                  > <snip>
                  > > >
                  > > > Do NOT USE CHINESE {11 point} Star Anise it is toxic.
                  > > >
                  > > > Sven
                  >
                  >
                  > Sven,
                  > I think you may be confusing CHINESE with JAPANESE.
                  >
                  > Star Anise (Badian)
                  > Botanical name: Illicium verum
                  >
                  > Star anise has properties very similar to anise (Pimpinella
                  anisum),
                  > although they are not botanically related.
                  > The plant is native to the south-eastern part of China and to
                  > Vietnam and the dried fruits are widely used in Asian cooking.
                  >
                  >
                  > Star Anise and Anise must NOT be confused with the POISONOUS
                  > JAPANESE Star Anise (Illicium anisatum - Illicium japonicum -
                  > Illicium lanceolatum - Illicium religiosum).
                  > A closely related species, the Japanese star anise, contains
                  > sikimitoxin and is toxic. Once star anise has been dried and
                  > processed, it is not possible to visually distinguish between the
                  > Chinese and Japanese forms.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Slainte!
                  > regards Harry
                • Robert Thomas
                  Hang on. Why is the poisonous stuff on the market? Is it cheaper to grow? Does it actually have a use? So many questions, so little (shot) glass. Rob. ...
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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                    Hang on. Why is the poisonous stuff on the market? Is
                    it cheaper to grow? Does it actually have a use?
                    So many questions, so little (shot) glass.
                    Rob.


                    --- Sven Pfitt <the_gimp98@...> wrote:

                    > Yup, got them swapped.
                    >
                    > 11 pettles is japanese and is toxic.
                    >
                    > 6or7 pettles Chinese is not toxic.
                    >
                    > It is still possible to distinguish if you have
                    > whole star anise, but
                    > not ground Star Anise which the article probably
                    > meant (It looks like
                    > you hit the FDA site).
                    >
                    > Sorry for the switch.
                    >
                    > Thanks Harry for catching that.
                    >
                    > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry"
                    > <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
                    > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco"
                    > <waljaco@h...> wrote:
                    > > > Chinese star anise is used as a replacement for
                    > Mediterranean
                    > > (green)
                    > > > aniseed for economic reasons. It is not toxic
                    > according to the
                    > > herbal
                    > > > literature.
                    > > > wal
                    > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Sven Pfitt"
                    > <the_gimp98@h...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > <snip>
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Do NOT USE CHINESE {11 point} Star Anise it is
                    > toxic.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Sven
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Sven,
                    > > I think you may be confusing CHINESE with
                    > JAPANESE.
                    > >
                    > > Star Anise (Badian)
                    > > Botanical name: Illicium verum
                    > >
                    > > Star anise has properties very similar to anise
                    > (Pimpinella
                    > anisum),
                    > > although they are not botanically related.
                    > > The plant is native to the south-eastern part of
                    > China and to
                    > > Vietnam and the dried fruits are widely used in
                    > Asian cooking.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Star Anise and Anise must NOT be confused with the
                    > POISONOUS
                    > > JAPANESE Star Anise (Illicium anisatum - Illicium
                    > japonicum -
                    > > Illicium lanceolatum - Illicium religiosum).
                    > > A closely related species, the Japanese star
                    > anise, contains
                    > > sikimitoxin and is toxic. Once star anise has been
                    > dried and
                    > > processed, it is not possible to visually
                    > distinguish between the
                    > > Chinese and Japanese forms.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Slainte!
                    > > regards Harry
                    >
                    >
                    >




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                  • waljaco
                    Their is a recipe for Pacharan/Patxaran (Basarana in Basque) in msg 3933 which came from a Spanish source. Note that the quantity for the camomile flowers is 6
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jul 7, 2005
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                      Their is a recipe for Pacharan/Patxaran (Basarana in Basque) in msg
                      3933 which came from a Spanish source. Note that the quantity for the
                      camomile flowers is 6 (1tsp) and the peel is from 1 orange.
                      The base spirit is "anis seco" and the quickest way to make it is to
                      add aniseed essential oil to a neutral alcohol. In "Distillation and
                      Rectification of Alcohol" by William T Brannt (1885) there is a recipe
                      for an Anise Liqueur using aniseed essential oil which scaled down is
                      1.5 grams aniseed essential oil (approx 1/2 tsp)/litre of neutral
                      40%abv. For a sweet anise liqueur, add 1 cup of sugar/litre.

                      wal

                      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Ackland" <Tony.Ackland@c...>
                      wrote:
                      > I recently had a question re Basarana. Can anyone (Wal ?) help Sacha
                      > out ?
                      >
                      > *****************************
                      > Dear Tony
                      >
                      > I thought you might like to know of a traditional Basque recipe
                      > for "Basarana" (literally "wild plum"), also known as patxaran. It's a
                      > liqueur made from sloes - about a third of the volume of your
                      > recipient, and sometimes a handful of blackberries to add colour,
                      > topped up and steeped for a couple of months in "anisado" - anise
                      > liqueur. Some people add vanilla pods, oranges and even a few coffee
                      > beans, but I think the sloes and blackberries are the basic
                      > traditional ingredients. Most people here on the northern side of the
                      > Basque country (in France) go to the other side (in Spain) to buy the
                      > anisado, but I'm interested in making my own, which is how I got onto
                      > your site in the first place. I'm still researching, but if you have
                      > any ideas or know any recipes for anisado, I'd love to know.
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