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RE: [Distillers] Re: I just finished distilling...

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  • Pete Sayers
    As i understand it, the only thing with yeast cells, is that they tend to burst when heated to distilling temp, imparting off tastes/smells. Pete ... From:
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 27, 2001
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      As i understand it, the only thing with yeast cells, is that they tend to
      burst when heated to distilling temp, imparting off tastes/smells.
      Pete

      -----Original Message-----
      From: goyeast@... [mailto:goyeast@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, 28 August 2001 12:58
      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Distillers] Re: I just finished distilling...


      I had never heard that over-aeration can lead to the production of
      fusels. In fact, I forgot to stir the wort before pitching, and the
      only splashing that occurred was during the sparging and siphoning
      operations, and even this was fairly moderate. Hmmm... Also, I
      mentioned that my fermented wort didn't sit on "dead" yeast for a
      long time. Of course, most of the yeast are just dormant. I was
      also wondering, is it the dead yeast, dormant yeast, or both that
      contribute to fusels (or do they really contribute, and if so, to
      what extent)?

      Regards,
      Goyeast


      --- In Distillers@y..., Tony & Elle Ackland <Tony.Ackland@c...> wrote:
      >
      > > I'm thinking, if you're really
      > > careful to use a good yeast, keep the fermentation temperature
      fairly
      > > constant and within the specified range, use filtered water,
      sparge
      > > and remove the grain, and don't let the wash sit on a heap of
      dead
      > > yeast for any appreciable length of time, your fusel production
      can
      > > be kept to such an extreme minimum. IS THIS RIGHT?
      >
      > I think so .. a quote I've found somewhere had ...
      >
      > Fusels increase depending on ...
      > * yeast strain (eg Saccharomysce cerevisia makes more than
      S.carlsbergensis)
      > * temperature (higher temp = more fusels)
      > * increased aeration and agitation (news to me ! so don't over-
      stirr it !)
      > * wort composition (nitrogen sources and readily metabolised sugars)
      >
      > Looks like you've got it pretty much right.
      >
      > Tony





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    • G&N
      Do the yeast cells cause bad taste and smell problems with a reflux still that gets95% ethanol? Glenn ... From: Pete Sayers To:
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 27, 2001
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        Do the yeast cells cause bad taste and smell problems with a reflux still
        that gets95% ethanol?

        Glenn
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Pete Sayers" <brubarn@...>
        To: <goyeast@...>; <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2001 9:41 AM
        Subject: RE: [Distillers] Re: I just finished distilling...


        > As i understand it, the only thing with yeast cells, is that they tend to
        > burst when heated to distilling temp, imparting off tastes/smells.
        > Pete
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: goyeast@... [mailto:goyeast@...]
        > Sent: Tuesday, 28 August 2001 12:58
        > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Distillers] Re: I just finished distilling...
        >
        >
        > I had never heard that over-aeration can lead to the production of
        > fusels. In fact, I forgot to stir the wort before pitching, and the
        > only splashing that occurred was during the sparging and siphoning
        > operations, and even this was fairly moderate. Hmmm... Also, I
        > mentioned that my fermented wort didn't sit on "dead" yeast for a
        > long time. Of course, most of the yeast are just dormant. I was
        > also wondering, is it the dead yeast, dormant yeast, or both that
        > contribute to fusels (or do they really contribute, and if so, to
        > what extent)?
        >
        > Regards,
        > Goyeast
        >
        >
        > --- In Distillers@y..., Tony & Elle Ackland <Tony.Ackland@c...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > I'm thinking, if you're really
        > > > careful to use a good yeast, keep the fermentation temperature
        > fairly
        > > > constant and within the specified range, use filtered water,
        > sparge
        > > > and remove the grain, and don't let the wash sit on a heap of
        > dead
        > > > yeast for any appreciable length of time, your fusel production
        > can
        > > > be kept to such an extreme minimum. IS THIS RIGHT?
        > >
        > > I think so .. a quote I've found somewhere had ...
        > >
        > > Fusels increase depending on ...
        > > * yeast strain (eg Saccharomysce cerevisia makes more than
        > S.carlsbergensis)
        > > * temperature (higher temp = more fusels)
        > > * increased aeration and agitation (news to me ! so don't over-
        > stirr it !)
        > > * wort composition (nitrogen sources and readily metabolised sugars)
        > >
        > > Looks like you've got it pretty much right.
        > >
        > > Tony
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • Tony & Elle Ackland
        ... I did a very quick search of some beer & wine making sites, but couldn t find much out. Trying to see if its the yeast itself or not. But they mostly
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 27, 2001
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          > I was
          > also wondering, is it the dead yeast, dormant yeast, or both that
          > contribute to fusels (or do they really contribute, and if so, to
          > what extent)?

          I did a very quick search of some beer & wine making sites, but couldn't
          find much out. Trying to see if its the yeast itself or not. But they
          mostly mentioned the temperature control, etc with regard to the fusels.
          There is the common practice of doing the secondary fermentation having
          racked the wash off the lees, but I don't know exactly what the purpose is
          - how the flavour modifies etc. Maybe Ted or other brewers can help
          explain whats being formed at that stage. Ian Smiley talks about the
          secondary fermentation occuring if the yeast is left to start digesting the
          longer/more complex sugars present - giving rise to esters etc, if doing a
          grain mash. But its not the same for a sugar-water mash. Also - what is
          released when/if ? the yeast cells start to break down / get consumed by
          other multiplying yeast ?

          Tony
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