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Re:Artificially Aging Spirits ( was Triple distilled Irish Whiskey.)

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  • Harry
    ... believe ... flavors ... esters ... open ... will ... All good ideas & experiments. However, the biggest drawback to the system is the glass itself. Glass
    Message 1 of 48 , May 2, 2005
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "morganfield1"
      <morganfield1@y...> wrote:
      > Openning the jars also let's the distillate "breath", which I
      believe
      > is a good idea. Oxydation of the tannins in the oak effects the
      flavors
      > imparted to the distillate. It also effects how cogeners and
      esters
      > react with each other during aging. JMSO.
      > Tip one, Morgan
      > ====================================================
      >
      > Then after it has been out of the refrigerator for a day or two,
      open
      > and close the jar to release the pressure. Higher temperatures
      will
      > cause the trapped air to expand, cooler to contract -



      All good ideas & experiments. However, the biggest drawback to the
      system is the glass itself. Glass can't breathe. Hence your
      suggestion of manually replacing the air. But as soon as you screw
      the lid back on, the container is again airtight. Barrels on the
      other hand, are breathing all the time, partly through flexing
      (expansion & contraction) due to ambient temperatures and humidity,
      but mostly through capillary action (2-way). You should read the
      article "How Barrels Work" in the Distillers Library by a
      winemaker. It will give you a better understanding, and there's
      some interesting experiments described in detail.

      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • duds2u
      ... After many hours of web browsing I have found a little more on the cuts for triple distillation. It just happens that it is for a scotch whisky though but
      Message 48 of 48 , Apr 30, 2007
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rocky_creek1" <rocky_creek@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Anyone know where they make the cuts?
        >

        After many hours of web browsing I have found a little more on the
        cuts for triple distillation. It just happens that it is for a scotch
        whisky though but the flow chart looks very similar to Irish. I
        found it on the Benrinnes site and will paraphrase it with some of my
        own inclusions. Unfortunately I don't have the complete story yet as
        I haven't been able to discover the cuts they make for the final
        Heart.

        The First Distillation - Wash Still
        The out put of the wash still is split into heads and tails; the
        Strong Low Wines, cut at >30% ABV, and Weak Low Wines cut at <30% ABV.

        The Second Distillation - Low Wines Still
        The Low Wines Still is charged with the Weak Low Wines, plus the Weak
        Feints (<30%) from the last distillation in the Low Wines Still, plus
        the <30% Feints (Tails) from the Spirit Still. This is distilled and
        again the out put is split in two, Strong Feints (>30% ABV) and Weak
        Feints (<30%).

        The Third Distillation - Spirit Still
        The Spirit Still is then loaded with the Strong Low Wines from the
        Wash Still, plus the Strong Feints, plus the Heads from the previous
        Spirit Still run.

        This is then distilled and split into four. Heads, Heart, >30%
        feints and <30% feints.

        I hope that it too confusing without a flow chart.

        Anyone care to make an educated stab at their final cuts if they were
        making heart runs at about 89 to 92%ABV? I pulled those numbers out
        of the flow chart in Harry's library.
        Cheers
        Mal T.
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