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RE: [Distillers] Feints and doubler #2/Thanks/Aging?

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  • Robert Mitchell
    As to aging, I ve put my spirit (made with a pot still and doubler from a wash of 20% malted barley, 20% unmalted barley, 30% corn, 20 % rye and 10% sugar),
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 6, 2001
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      As to aging, I've put my spirit (made with a pot still and doubler from  a wash of 20% malted barley, 20% unmalted barley, 30% corn, 20 % rye and 10% sugar), in a 5 gal glass secondary fermenter ( I  make wine). I've put in some oak chips which I previously soaked in my Zinfendal to give that wine an oak flavour. I also soaked some American medium  toast oak chips in some dry port and added those chips too. I also added 1 oz of sherry. My theory is that since most scotch whiskey is aged in recycled wine barrels,  adding some wine,port or sherry should help to duplicate the process. Is this the right way to go?

      After2 weeks it has a beautiful amber colour but of course is very harsh. Should I take some oak chips and perhaps cook them on the bbq enough to really carbonize them and then add that? Thanks, Rob

      "D. C." <distiller@...> wrote:


      << Thanks to Terry and DC for your suggestions. This spirit seems a lot
      smoother than the previous run. >>

      Good deal. I'm glad things are coming together for you.

      << Their is an aftertaste but not at all like raw shine. >>

      I'd say to let it age a bit, maybe even with a little oak or hickory, and
      she should even out a bit more for you.

      Your Brother in Magick,
      The Omnipresent Mecakyrios





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    • D. C.
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 6, 2001
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        << I've put in some oak chips which I previously soaked in my Zinfendal to
        give that wine an oak flavour. I also soaked some American medium toast oak
        chips in some dry port and added those chips too. I also added 1 oz of
        sherry. My theory is that since most scotch whiskey is aged in recycled wine
        barrels, adding some wine,port or sherry should help to duplicate the
        process. Is this the right way to go? >>

        Is this the right way to go . . . well, you tell me . . . when you taste the
        final product, do you like what you taste? I only ask this because
        everyone's taste and wants are different. For me I think that it "sounds"
        like it would have an interesting and unique taste. Since I can not taste it
        I can not say for sure if I like it or not.

        Now, if you do like the taste and everything is fine, then you are done. If
        it tastes good, but there is just something about it that should be better,
        then we have to find out what could be causing the problem. So again I have
        to ask, how does it taste?

        << After2 weeks it has a beautiful amber colour but of course is very harsh.
        Should I take some oak chips and perhaps cook them on the bbq enough to
        really carbonize them and then add that? >>

        I'll be willing to bet that if you did the following you would notice an
        improvement:

        Use a 5 gallon plastic bucket instead of the glass carboy. This will allow
        for the "classic" air/alcohol dissipation like that in wooden barrels. Put
        the wood chips/shavings/whatever in the bucket to give the old barrel
        flavor. Then let it SIT! Aging didn't get it's name from letting the product
        sit for years at a time for nothing. 2 weeks is enough to build up your
        anticipation for the drink, but it does minimal things to the spirit. Let
        the spirit sit for at least 6 months before you try your true taste testing.
        In 6 months the plastic will just start to allow for the air/alcohol
        dissipation to *begin*, so it will still be somewhat rough, but you will
        notice a big difference. After that tasting session, let it sit for another
        6 months. Keep doing this until you feel it has worn its edges enough to
        bottle.

        If you want to char the wood that it OK, as long as you are going after the
        "charred barrel" flavor that most people have. This will add flavor to the
        spirit, but not do much for the harsh edge. It might mask it some, however.

        I hope this is somewhat helpful.

        Your Brother in Magick,
        The Omnipresent Mecakyrios


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