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Re: Replacing sucrose with dextrose (glucose)

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  • Harry
    ... as ... Yup. Water. There are two forms of dextrose. Monohydrate (1 water molecule bound to each molecule of dextrose) and Anhydrose (no water,
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2005
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
      >
      > "You need 12.5% more dextrose to reach the same alcohol percentage
      as
      > with sucrose."
      > (http://distillery-yeast.com/turboyeast_faq.htm)
      >
      > There must be some scientific reason for this. Anyone know?
      >
      > wal



      Yup. Water. There are two forms of dextrose. Monohydrate (1 water
      molecule bound to each molecule of dextrose) and Anhydrose (no
      water, injectable pharmaceutical grade).

      Dextrose Monohydrate is the Baker's & Brewer's sugar of choice as it
      is pure glucose, readily assimilated by yeast, needs no inversion,
      and contains no unfermentable dextrins. Chemical formula
      C6H12O6.H2O which is 6 carbon 12 hydrogen 6 oxygen atoms bound to 1
      molecule of H2O (water). If you work out the weight of a molecule
      from the Atomic Weights charts, you will find the water part to be
      some 12.5% by weight of the total. Therefore when adding Dextrose
      Monohyrate, you must increase it's weight by 12.5% to get the same
      sugar fermentability. You can't ferment water.


      HTH
      Slainte!
      regards Harry
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