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Re: [Distillers] Re: Making a small diameter condenser coil

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  • suitcase1499@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/2/2005 1:12:27 AM Eastern Standard Time, jamyd_007@yahoo.com writes: Thank s for the response. Yes, it seems making it 1 1/4 was a bit of
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 1, 2005
      In a message dated 1/2/2005 1:12:27 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      jamyd_007@... writes:

      Thank's for the response.

      Yes, it seems making it 1 1/4" was a bit of a mistake. I'm patient
      though. Judging from the calculations presented on homedistiller.org
      it should take about 5 hours to collect 2.3 L of ~93% from 17 litres
      of 14% wash. Then the run is basically done. Considering I can't just
      leave it to work this is rather a long time


      I've found that salt works better than sand for filling and winding coils,
      This is just my experence and opinion no garuntees :>) Excuse the spelling I've
      had a bit of my refinings.

      Suitcase.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jimpuchai
      ... coils, ... spelling I ve ... At some extra expense you could use Field s metal or Wood s metal Google for them. These are alloys that melt at hotwater
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
        >
        > I've found that salt works better than sand for filling and winding
        coils,
        > This is just my experence and opinion no garuntees :>) Excuse the
        spelling I've
        > had a bit of my refinings.
        >
        > Suitcase.
        >
        >

        At some extra expense you could use "Field's metal" or "Wood's
        metal" Google for them.

        These are alloys that melt at hotwater temperatures. Fill the pipe
        and let cool, Bend your coil and reheat to have the metal flow out
        easily. You can reuse the metal for the next creation, which helps to
        offset the cost a litle.

        Note that Wood's metal contains cadmium which needs very careful
        handling.

        Jim Puchai.
      • Mike Nixon
        jamyd_007 wrote: Subject: [Distillers] Re: Making a small diameter condenser coil By the way, with a practice piece I tried filling a piece of 1/4 flexible
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
          jamyd_007 wrote:
          Subject: [Distillers] Re: Making a small diameter condenser coil

          By the way, with a practice piece I tried filling a piece of 1/4"
          flexible copper tube with ice and bending that around a 1/2" form. It
          worked reasonably well. It has to be winter to work with it though
          before it melts because you can just go outside and have lots of time
          to work. It melts quickly at room temperature.
          =================
          Hi Jamyd,

          First of all, let me apologise if "Ed's Journey" on our website led to you havig problems with using sand to prevent tubing collapsing when making coils. It is useful only when the tubing has a fairly large diameter ... as you have found out to your cost! Jim Puchai is quite right when he says that "Field's metal" or "Wood's metal" is the excellent stuff to use, but it is difficult to get hold of these days as it does, as he also points out, contains cadmium and is therefore more strictly controlled.

          Ice. I'm afraid, is not the way to go. As any skater will tell you, ice melts when under pressure, even when kept below normal freezing point. Some have tried sealing water in the tubing by closing both ends, for water is practically incompressible, but I have never heard any glad cries of success from anyone using that method.

          You might try salt, as Suitcase has suggested. That, at least, will dissolve in water afterwards ... it will just take a long time for the water to get through all the coils. Professionally, you would use a mandrel of the right diameter that has a helical groove cut into it, and a "pulley wheel" moved by a lever to "persuade" the tubing into those grooves (have a look at a plumber's pipe bender).

          Good luck with your efforts!

          All the best,
          Mike N


          .


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Harry
          ... ... you, ice melts when under pressure, even when kept below normal freezing point. Some have tried sealing water in the tubing by closing both
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Nixon" <mike@s...> wrote:
            > jamyd_007 wrote:

            > Hi Jamyd,
            <snip>
            > Ice. I'm afraid, is not the way to go. As any skater will tell
            you, ice melts when under pressure, even when kept below normal
            freezing point. Some have tried sealing water in the tubing by
            closing both ends, for water is practically incompressible, but I
            have never heard any glad cries of success from anyone using that
            method.
            >
            > You might try salt, as Suitcase has suggested. That, at least,
            will dissolve in water afterwards ... it will just take a long time
            for the water to get through all the coils. Professionally, you
            would use a mandrel of the right diameter that has a helical groove
            cut into it, and a "pulley wheel" moved by a lever to "persuade" the
            tubing into those grooves (have a look at a plumber's pipe bender).
            >
            > Good luck with your efforts!
            >
            > All the best,
            > Mike N


            The trick is simple, really. A pair of welder's leather gauntlets,
            a pair of pliers, a propane torch and a former and tubing. Do it
            slowly. Heat a couple inches, bend a couple inches while applying
            stretch to the end of the tubing with the pliers. Heat a bit more,
            bend a bit more etc. etc. Patience, patience.

            As you heat each small section, it softens. Apply stretch to keep
            things trim and taut, while using your gloved hands to keep it all
            neat. The small amount of working applied to the tubing rehardens
            it as you go, which is why you must do it in small increments.

            Slainte!
            regards Harry
          • Harry
            ... gauntlets, ... more, ... Sorry, I must be getting inebriated. :-) I forgot the important bit. The cold wet rag. Apply to each heated section as you go.
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
              wrote:
              >
              >
              > The trick is simple, really. A pair of welder's leather
              gauntlets,
              > a pair of pliers, a propane torch and a former and tubing. Do it
              > slowly. Heat a couple inches, bend a couple inches while applying
              > stretch to the end of the tubing with the pliers. Heat a bit
              more,
              > bend a bit more etc. etc. Patience, patience.
              >
              > As you heat each small section, it softens. Apply stretch to keep
              > things trim and taut, while using your gloved hands to keep it all
              > neat. The small amount of working applied to the tubing rehardens
              > it as you go, which is why you must do it in small increments.
              >
              > Slainte!
              > regards Harry


              Sorry, I must be getting inebriated. :-)
              I forgot the important bit. The cold wet rag. Apply to each heated
              section as you go. THIS is what softens the copper tubing.
              Apologies for that. :-/

              Slainte!
              regards Harry
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