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Making a small diameter condenser coil

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  • jamyd_007
    Hello, I m new to distilling and just recently tried to create a condenser for a nixon-stone type head. Only I m having difficulty with it. In order to bend
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 30, 2004
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      Hello, I'm new to distilling and just recently tried to create a
      condenser for a nixon-stone type head. Only I'm having difficulty with
      it. In order to bend the pipe, I filled it with sand, now the sand is
      stuck!

      The pipe used is 1 1/4" in diameter, which I gather is on the small
      side. Now, I had to make a coil of flexible copper tube (1/4") fit
      into this small diameter, without collapsing the tube. So, having read
      about Ed's Project at
      http://www.amphora-society.com/Activities/Project/project.html I
      decided to fill the tube with dry sand to keep it from collapsing (the
      sand is not as fine as it should be maybe). I coiled this around a
      1/2" copper pipe as a form. It was a bit difficult but I got it around
      with no collapsing.

      My problem now of course is that the tube is full of sand, and I can't
      get it out! I was hoping it wouldn't be hard to get out, but it is.

      I've tried wetting the sand, then heating the pipe to try to force the
      sand out with water vapor, but is just seems to push out vapor past
      the sand. Also, I'm sort of afraid of a steam explosion doing that.

      Poking a wire up there doesn't seem to work, and the pipe length is 10
      feet long so it doesn't seem like a good strategy.

      How do other people make condenser coils without having the tube collapse?

      I was thinking I could use epsom salts instead of sand, then heat the
      tube and let it melt out after I was done bending.

      I was thinking that maybe my coil is simply too small in diameter and
      I should be using 2" and sand wouldn't be required. I don't know if
      that's right.

      Any help appreciated
    • Harry
      ... with ... is ... read ... (the ... around ... can t ... the ... is 10 ... collapse? ... the ... and ... Get a 2 column. 1+1/4 is way too small. re. the
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 30, 2004
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamyd_007" <jamyd_007@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hello, I'm new to distilling and just recently tried to create a
        > condenser for a nixon-stone type head. Only I'm having difficulty
        with
        > it. In order to bend the pipe, I filled it with sand, now the sand
        is
        > stuck!
        >
        > The pipe used is 1 1/4" in diameter, which I gather is on the small
        > side. Now, I had to make a coil of flexible copper tube (1/4") fit
        > into this small diameter, without collapsing the tube. So, having
        read
        > about Ed's Project at
        > http://www.amphora-society.com/Activities/Project/project.html I
        > decided to fill the tube with dry sand to keep it from collapsing
        (the
        > sand is not as fine as it should be maybe). I coiled this around a
        > 1/2" copper pipe as a form. It was a bit difficult but I got it
        around
        > with no collapsing.
        >
        > My problem now of course is that the tube is full of sand, and I
        can't
        > get it out! I was hoping it wouldn't be hard to get out, but it is.
        >
        > I've tried wetting the sand, then heating the pipe to try to force
        the
        > sand out with water vapor, but is just seems to push out vapor past
        > the sand. Also, I'm sort of afraid of a steam explosion doing that.
        >
        > Poking a wire up there doesn't seem to work, and the pipe length
        is 10
        > feet long so it doesn't seem like a good strategy.
        >
        > How do other people make condenser coils without having the tube
        collapse?
        >
        > I was thinking I could use epsom salts instead of sand, then heat
        the
        > tube and let it melt out after I was done bending.
        >
        > I was thinking that maybe my coil is simply too small in diameter
        and
        > I should be using 2" and sand wouldn't be required. I don't know if
        > that's right.
        >
        > Any help appreciated


        Get a 2" column. 1+1/4" is way too small. re. the epsom salts.
        yes that will work, around a 3/4" former.

        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • king pin
        Heya Jamyd, I reply to this from trial and error and with greatly appreciated help from my esteemed fellow distillers. I had a similar problem with a 1.5
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 30, 2004
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          Heya Jamyd,

          I reply to this from trial and error and with greatly appreciated help from my esteemed fellow distillers. I had a similar problem with a 1.5" column. 1/4" coil was as someone stated, "probably going against the laws of physics." They were right. As Harry stated, get a 2" pipe or go to an auto supply store and get some smaller copper tubing. Thats what I did, then I connected it to the 1/4" tubing and created an outter condensor also. The inner& outter condensor combo does a great job and I still found a use for the 12 feet of 1/4" tubing, rofl.

          Best of luck!

          Regards,
          KP
          Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamyd_007" <jamyd_007@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hello, I'm new to distilling and just recently tried to create a
          > condenser for a nixon-stone type head. Only I'm having difficulty
          with
          > it. In order to bend the pipe, I filled it with sand, now the sand
          is
          > stuck!
          >
          > The pipe used is 1 1/4" in diameter, which I gather is on the small
          > side. Now, I had to make a coil of flexible copper tube (1/4") fit
          > into this small diameter, without collapsing the tube. So, having
          read
          > about Ed's Project at
          > http://www.amphora-society.com/Activities/Project/project.html I
          > decided to fill the tube with dry sand to keep it from collapsing
          (the
          > sand is not as fine as it should be maybe). I coiled this around a
          > 1/2" copper pipe as a form. It was a bit difficult but I got it
          around
          > with no collapsing.
          >
          > My problem now of course is that the tube is full of sand, and I
          can't
          > get it out! I was hoping it wouldn't be hard to get out, but it is.
          >
          > I've tried wetting the sand, then heating the pipe to try to force
          the
          > sand out with water vapor, but is just seems to push out vapor past
          > the sand. Also, I'm sort of afraid of a steam explosion doing that.
          >
          > Poking a wire up there doesn't seem to work, and the pipe length
          is 10
          > feet long so it doesn't seem like a good strategy.
          >
          > How do other people make condenser coils without having the tube
          collapse?
          >
          > I was thinking I could use epsom salts instead of sand, then heat
          the
          > tube and let it melt out after I was done bending.
          >
          > I was thinking that maybe my coil is simply too small in diameter
          and
          > I should be using 2" and sand wouldn't be required. I don't know if
          > that's right.
          >
          > Any help appreciated


          Get a 2" column. 1+1/4" is way too small. re. the epsom salts.
          yes that will work, around a 3/4" former.

          Slainte!
          regards Harry





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        • rodmacd2000
          First let me offer congratulations! I know of no-one else who s managed to successfully wind 1/4 copper tubing over a 1/2 form into a coil which fits into a
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 31, 2004
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            First let me offer congratulations! I know of no-one else who's
            managed to successfully wind 1/4" copper tubing over a 1/2" form into
            a coil which fits into a 1 1/4" housing.

            How to get the sand out? Assuming the sand is dry it seems to me that
            gravity assisted by a source of strong vibration should do the job.
            There are many ways of doing this depending on what power tools you
            have available.

            Your 1 1/4" column is on the small side but will work perfectly well
            as long as you're not in a big hurry when performing distillation.
            Remember that capacity varies with the square of column diameter so a
            1 1/2" column will run 44% faster than your 1 1/4" column and a 2"
            diameter one will be 256% as fast!

            If you conclude that you need to wind a new condenser coil I urge you
            to visit an auto supply store and purchase some 3/16" copper tubing
            (used for either brake or fuel lines - can't remember which). You may
            be able to wind this onto a 3/4" form without the use of sand
            (haven't tried it myself so don't know for sure). It will then help
            if you solder short lengths of 1/4" tubing to the 3/16" ends in order
            to accomodate commonly available 1/4" compression fittings.

            Finally remember that the diameter of your condenser housing doesn't
            have to be the same as your main column. i.e. use a 1 1/4" to 1 1/2"
            (or even 2") expander so that your condenser housing can be wide
            enough to accomodate a much wider coil.

            Hope thus helps some

            Rod

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamyd_007" <jamyd_007@y...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hello, I'm new to distilling and just recently tried to create a
            > condenser for a nixon-stone type head. Only I'm having difficulty
            with
            > it. In order to bend the pipe, I filled it with sand, now the sand
            is
            > stuck!
            >
            > The pipe used is 1 1/4" in diameter, which I gather is on the small
            > side. Now, I had to make a coil of flexible copper tube (1/4") fit
            > into this small diameter, without collapsing the tube. I coiled
            this around a
            > 1/2" copper pipe as a form. It was a bit difficult but I got it
            around
            > with no collapsing.
            >
            > My problem now of course is that the tube is full of sand, and I
            can't
            > get it out!
          • jamyd_007
            Thank you both for your quick and informative responses :-). I plan to try follow the suggestion of the smaller tube. I found a supplier of 1/8 tube so I ll
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 31, 2004
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              Thank you both for your quick and informative responses :-).

              I plan to try follow the suggestion of the smaller tube. I found a
              supplier of 1/8" tube so I'll try that. I will probably fill it with
              either magnesium sulfate or salt, then dissolve this out after. I
              think magnesium sulfate would be better because it has water of
              hydration right in its structure, so all I would have to do is heat it
              up to dissolve it (I think).

              I chose this (potential) solution because it's cheaper than making a
              2" condenser now that I've already bought stuff for 1 1/4". Otherwise
              it would set me back about $50 for new copper much of which I won't
              use. BTW, I made my thing out of 1 1/4" because my heating element is
              external and 1200 watts which is rather small. That being said, I
              think if I was going to do it again I would go 2" though, even if the
              pipe is twice the cost.

              I think my 1/4" tube has basically had it because it's sort of mangled
              and hard to bend even though I tried annealing it.

              I'll let you know how it goes.

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, king pin <kingpin_kingpin2001@y...>
              wrote:
              > Heya Jamyd,
              >
              > I reply to this from trial and error and with greatly appreciated
              help from my esteemed fellow distillers. I had a similar problem with
              a 1.5" column. 1/4" coil was as someone stated, "probably going
              against the laws of physics." They were right. As Harry stated, get a
              2" pipe or go to an auto supply store and get some smaller copper
              tubing. Thats what I did, then I connected it to the 1/4" tubing and
              created an outter condensor also. The inner& outter condensor combo
              does a great job and I still found a use for the 12 feet of 1/4"
              tubing, rofl.
              >
              > Best of luck!
              >
              > Regards,
              > KP
            • Mike Nixon
              jamyd_007 wrote: Subject: [Distillers] Re: Making a small diameter condenser coil Thank you both for your quick and informative responses :-). I plan to try
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 31, 2004
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                jamyd_007 wrote:
                Subject: [Distillers] Re: Making a small diameter condenser coil

                Thank you both for your quick and informative responses :-).

                I plan to try follow the suggestion of the smaller tube. I found a
                supplier of 1/8" tube so I'll try that. I will probably fill it with
                either magnesium sulfate or salt, then dissolve this out after. I
                think magnesium sulfate would be better because it has water of
                hydration right in its structure, so all I would have to do is heat it
                up to dissolve it (I think).
                ===========================
                I think you will find that you can wind 1/8" tubing quite easily without the
                need to pack it with anything.
                Use a former made from a wooden broomstick or something to work on, and wind
                firmly to do it in one operation. Do not unwind and try again if you make
                small mistakes, for that will just work-harden the copper and lead to
                collapse.

                All the best,
                Mike N
              • Lindsay Williams
                Rod gave good advice when he suggested 3/16 tubing. You need to be careful that you are not going to ruin your still by persevering with a small condenser
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 31, 2004
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                  Rod gave good advice when he suggested 3/16" tubing. You need to be
                  careful that you are not going to ruin your still by persevering with
                  a small condenser shroud. You are letting the small column dictate the
                  design of a very crucial part of your still, namely, the condenser. It
                  HAS to be able to knock-down ALL vapour thrown at it and to do this it
                  needs to have enough area and enough water going through it. In my
                  opinion, 3/16" is the minimum cross section that would be sure to
                  work. Even this needs quite a pressure to force water through it.
                  Going down a size would need a lot of pressure to get enough volume
                  through it.

                  The 3/16" tubing is easily wound around a 1.5" former without needing
                  any filling. This then fits a 2" shroud rather nicely. Can't you find
                  a bit of scrap 2" tubing from a scrap metal dealer?

                  Just my opinion, of course, but I do know about the 3/16" tube because
                  that's what I used.

                  Cheers,
                  Lindsay.

                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamyd_007" <jamyd_007@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thank you both for your quick and informative responses :-).
                  >
                  > I plan to try follow the suggestion of the smaller tube. I found a
                  > supplier of 1/8" tube so I'll try that. I will probably fill it with
                  > either magnesium sulfate or salt, then dissolve this out after. I
                  > think magnesium sulfate would be better because it has water of
                  > hydration right in its structure, so all I would have to do is heat it
                  > up to dissolve it (I think).
                  >
                  > I chose this (potential) solution because it's cheaper than making a
                  > 2" condenser now that I've already bought stuff for 1 1/4". Otherwise
                  > it would set me back about $50 for new copper much of which I won't
                  > use. BTW, I made my thing out of 1 1/4" because my heating element is
                  > external and 1200 watts which is rather small. That being said, I
                  > think if I was going to do it again I would go 2" though, even if the
                  > pipe is twice the cost.
                  >
                  > I think my 1/4" tube has basically had it because it's sort of mangled
                  > and hard to bend even though I tried annealing it.
                  >
                  > I'll let you know how it goes.
                  >
                  > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, king pin <kingpin_kingpin2001@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > Heya Jamyd,
                  > >
                  > > I reply to this from trial and error and with greatly appreciated
                  > help from my esteemed fellow distillers. I had a similar problem with
                  > a 1.5" column. 1/4" coil was as someone stated, "probably going
                  > against the laws of physics." They were right. As Harry stated, get a
                  > 2" pipe or go to an auto supply store and get some smaller copper
                  > tubing. Thats what I did, then I connected it to the 1/4" tubing and
                  > created an outter condensor also. The inner& outter condensor combo
                  > does a great job and I still found a use for the 12 feet of 1/4"
                  > tubing, rofl.
                  > >
                  > > Best of luck!
                  > >
                  > > Regards,
                  > > KP
                • jamyd_007
                  Thank s for the response. Yes, it seems making it 1 1/4 was a bit of a mistake. I m patient though. Judging from the calculations presented on
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jan 1, 2005
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                    Thank's for the response.

                    Yes, it seems making it 1 1/4" was a bit of a mistake. I'm patient
                    though. Judging from the calculations presented on homedistiller.org
                    it should take about 5 hours to collect 2.3 L of ~93% from 17 litres
                    of 14% wash. Then the run is basically done. Considering I can't just
                    leave it to work this is rather a long time.

                    Today one of my friends managed to cut about three feet off the end of
                    the coil, and get all the sand out by shaking it. So it's still 7
                    feet long which seems reasonable. I don't really want to make the
                    condenser anything but 1 1/4" just because I would have to buy some
                    more copper which is inconvenient for me, and sort of expensive.

                    I'd done a lot of work on the coil by filling it with water, then
                    heating it to loosen the sand by pushing steam though it. Then shaking
                    the tube to get the sand out. I was making progress, then it just
                    stopped coming. Probably a jam of some kind I guess. Anyway, I
                    certainly wouldn't recommend the whole sand method. I think it is
                    meant only for shorter turns, and for that it probably works quite well.

                    By the way, with a practice piece I tried filling a piece of 1/4"
                    flexible copper tube with ice and bending that around a 1/2" form. It
                    worked reasonably well. It has to be winter to work with it though
                    before it melts because you can just go outside and have lots of time
                    to work. It melts quickly at room temperature.

                    Thank you to everyone for their help; I've found this to be quite a
                    friendly group.

                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rodmacd2000" <rmacdoug@r...> wrote:
                    >
                    > First let me offer congratulations! I know of no-one else who's
                    > managed to successfully wind 1/4" copper tubing over a 1/2" form into
                    > a coil which fits into a 1 1/4" housing.
                    >
                    > How to get the sand out? Assuming the sand is dry it seems to me that
                    > gravity assisted by a source of strong vibration should do the job.
                    > There are many ways of doing this depending on what power tools you
                    > have available.
                    >
                    > Your 1 1/4" column is on the small side but will work perfectly well
                    > as long as you're not in a big hurry when performing distillation.
                    > Remember that capacity varies with the square of column diameter so a
                    > 1 1/2" column will run 44% faster than your 1 1/4" column and a 2"
                    > diameter one will be 256% as fast!
                    >
                    > If you conclude that you need to wind a new condenser coil I urge you
                    > to visit an auto supply store and purchase some 3/16" copper tubing
                    > (used for either brake or fuel lines - can't remember which). You may
                    > be able to wind this onto a 3/4" form without the use of sand
                    > (haven't tried it myself so don't know for sure). It will then help
                    > if you solder short lengths of 1/4" tubing to the 3/16" ends in order
                    > to accomodate commonly available 1/4" compression fittings.
                    >
                    > Finally remember that the diameter of your condenser housing doesn't
                    > have to be the same as your main column. i.e. use a 1 1/4" to 1 1/2"
                    > (or even 2") expander so that your condenser housing can be wide
                    > enough to accomodate a much wider coil.
                    >
                    > Hope thus helps some
                    >
                    > Rod
                    >
                    > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamyd_007" <jamyd_007@y...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Hello, I'm new to distilling and just recently tried to create a
                    > > condenser for a nixon-stone type head. Only I'm having difficulty
                    > with
                    > > it. In order to bend the pipe, I filled it with sand, now the sand
                    > is
                    > > stuck!
                    > >
                    > > The pipe used is 1 1/4" in diameter, which I gather is on the small
                    > > side. Now, I had to make a coil of flexible copper tube (1/4") fit
                    > > into this small diameter, without collapsing the tube. I coiled
                    > this around a
                    > > 1/2" copper pipe as a form. It was a bit difficult but I got it
                    > around
                    > > with no collapsing.
                    > >
                    > > My problem now of course is that the tube is full of sand, and I
                    > can't
                    > > get it out!
                  • suitcase1499@aol.com
                    In a message dated 1/2/2005 1:12:27 AM Eastern Standard Time, jamyd_007@yahoo.com writes: Thank s for the response. Yes, it seems making it 1 1/4 was a bit of
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jan 1, 2005
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                      In a message dated 1/2/2005 1:12:27 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                      jamyd_007@... writes:

                      Thank's for the response.

                      Yes, it seems making it 1 1/4" was a bit of a mistake. I'm patient
                      though. Judging from the calculations presented on homedistiller.org
                      it should take about 5 hours to collect 2.3 L of ~93% from 17 litres
                      of 14% wash. Then the run is basically done. Considering I can't just
                      leave it to work this is rather a long time


                      I've found that salt works better than sand for filling and winding coils,
                      This is just my experence and opinion no garuntees :>) Excuse the spelling I've
                      had a bit of my refinings.

                      Suitcase.


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • jimpuchai
                      ... coils, ... spelling I ve ... At some extra expense you could use Field s metal or Wood s metal Google for them. These are alloys that melt at hotwater
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
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                        >
                        > I've found that salt works better than sand for filling and winding
                        coils,
                        > This is just my experence and opinion no garuntees :>) Excuse the
                        spelling I've
                        > had a bit of my refinings.
                        >
                        > Suitcase.
                        >
                        >

                        At some extra expense you could use "Field's metal" or "Wood's
                        metal" Google for them.

                        These are alloys that melt at hotwater temperatures. Fill the pipe
                        and let cool, Bend your coil and reheat to have the metal flow out
                        easily. You can reuse the metal for the next creation, which helps to
                        offset the cost a litle.

                        Note that Wood's metal contains cadmium which needs very careful
                        handling.

                        Jim Puchai.
                      • Mike Nixon
                        jamyd_007 wrote: Subject: [Distillers] Re: Making a small diameter condenser coil By the way, with a practice piece I tried filling a piece of 1/4 flexible
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
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                          jamyd_007 wrote:
                          Subject: [Distillers] Re: Making a small diameter condenser coil

                          By the way, with a practice piece I tried filling a piece of 1/4"
                          flexible copper tube with ice and bending that around a 1/2" form. It
                          worked reasonably well. It has to be winter to work with it though
                          before it melts because you can just go outside and have lots of time
                          to work. It melts quickly at room temperature.
                          =================
                          Hi Jamyd,

                          First of all, let me apologise if "Ed's Journey" on our website led to you havig problems with using sand to prevent tubing collapsing when making coils. It is useful only when the tubing has a fairly large diameter ... as you have found out to your cost! Jim Puchai is quite right when he says that "Field's metal" or "Wood's metal" is the excellent stuff to use, but it is difficult to get hold of these days as it does, as he also points out, contains cadmium and is therefore more strictly controlled.

                          Ice. I'm afraid, is not the way to go. As any skater will tell you, ice melts when under pressure, even when kept below normal freezing point. Some have tried sealing water in the tubing by closing both ends, for water is practically incompressible, but I have never heard any glad cries of success from anyone using that method.

                          You might try salt, as Suitcase has suggested. That, at least, will dissolve in water afterwards ... it will just take a long time for the water to get through all the coils. Professionally, you would use a mandrel of the right diameter that has a helical groove cut into it, and a "pulley wheel" moved by a lever to "persuade" the tubing into those grooves (have a look at a plumber's pipe bender).

                          Good luck with your efforts!

                          All the best,
                          Mike N


                          .


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Harry
                          ... ... you, ice melts when under pressure, even when kept below normal freezing point. Some have tried sealing water in the tubing by closing both
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Nixon" <mike@s...> wrote:
                            > jamyd_007 wrote:

                            > Hi Jamyd,
                            <snip>
                            > Ice. I'm afraid, is not the way to go. As any skater will tell
                            you, ice melts when under pressure, even when kept below normal
                            freezing point. Some have tried sealing water in the tubing by
                            closing both ends, for water is practically incompressible, but I
                            have never heard any glad cries of success from anyone using that
                            method.
                            >
                            > You might try salt, as Suitcase has suggested. That, at least,
                            will dissolve in water afterwards ... it will just take a long time
                            for the water to get through all the coils. Professionally, you
                            would use a mandrel of the right diameter that has a helical groove
                            cut into it, and a "pulley wheel" moved by a lever to "persuade" the
                            tubing into those grooves (have a look at a plumber's pipe bender).
                            >
                            > Good luck with your efforts!
                            >
                            > All the best,
                            > Mike N


                            The trick is simple, really. A pair of welder's leather gauntlets,
                            a pair of pliers, a propane torch and a former and tubing. Do it
                            slowly. Heat a couple inches, bend a couple inches while applying
                            stretch to the end of the tubing with the pliers. Heat a bit more,
                            bend a bit more etc. etc. Patience, patience.

                            As you heat each small section, it softens. Apply stretch to keep
                            things trim and taut, while using your gloved hands to keep it all
                            neat. The small amount of working applied to the tubing rehardens
                            it as you go, which is why you must do it in small increments.

                            Slainte!
                            regards Harry
                          • Harry
                            ... gauntlets, ... more, ... Sorry, I must be getting inebriated. :-) I forgot the important bit. The cold wet rag. Apply to each heated section as you go.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
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                              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > The trick is simple, really. A pair of welder's leather
                              gauntlets,
                              > a pair of pliers, a propane torch and a former and tubing. Do it
                              > slowly. Heat a couple inches, bend a couple inches while applying
                              > stretch to the end of the tubing with the pliers. Heat a bit
                              more,
                              > bend a bit more etc. etc. Patience, patience.
                              >
                              > As you heat each small section, it softens. Apply stretch to keep
                              > things trim and taut, while using your gloved hands to keep it all
                              > neat. The small amount of working applied to the tubing rehardens
                              > it as you go, which is why you must do it in small increments.
                              >
                              > Slainte!
                              > regards Harry


                              Sorry, I must be getting inebriated. :-)
                              I forgot the important bit. The cold wet rag. Apply to each heated
                              section as you go. THIS is what softens the copper tubing.
                              Apologies for that. :-/

                              Slainte!
                              regards Harry
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