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Re: Malting question

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  • waljaco
    Take care. Chinese brown sugar appears to be caramelized white sugar rather than natural molasses. wal ... boil/steam each ... a soak, ... it that ...
    Message 1 of 37 , Dec 1, 2004
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      Take care. Chinese brown sugar appears to be caramelized white sugar
      rather than natural molasses.
      wal
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Brendan Keith" <bkeith@s...>
      wrote:
      > Good advice. If I were to step ferment it, I was going to
      boil/steam each
      > batch only as needed.
      >
      > I also read about the souring step, but planned to skip that. Just
      a "soak,
      > rinse, steam, cool, add jiu qu, add next batch" sequence.
      >
      > Yet another delay, or exciting experiment, if you want to look at
      it that
      > way occurred to me when I was at the Chinese supermarket
      researching rice.
      > They have these brown sugar slabs, about 3"x5"x1", 1 lb each on
      sale. I
      > figured a decent rum might be made from these. They seem more
      natural than
      > the brown sugar made North American style, which I am led to
      believe is
      > fairly highly refined then doped with some molasses for colour.
      >
      > Is a brewer's yeast more suitable for rum than a wine yeast?
      Hector?
      > --
      > Brendan Keith
      > bkeith@s...
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Andrew Forsberg [mailto:andrew@u...]
      > Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2004 12:49 AM
      > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: RE: [Distillers] Malting question
      >
      >
      > For a 4kg batch I'd start with 2kgs and add the remainder a few
      days
      > later. Or try 2 + 1 + 1. I dunno -- don't take my word for it, go
      have a
      > play around and let us know how you get on! I'm not an expert,
      I've just
      > been playing about with these moulds for a year and a bit now and
      had a
      > lot of fun with them. It's been a combination of trial and error,
      and
      > online research.
      >
      > One warning -- unless you're able to keep sanitation standards
      extremely
      > tight I'd avoid leaving uncooked rice soaking for more than a
      couple of
      > days.
      >
      > Wal mentioned, or posted a link to an article describing, the
      process of
      > 'souring' the rice by leaving it to soak for 10 days or so before
      > cooking. I think that's an extra-for-experts experiment...
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Harry
      ... part. ... moonshine ... I don t think it s the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule) that s the issue, Wal. It s more a question of economics and
      Message 37 of 37 , Dec 4, 2004
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > Must stop relying on memory as I appear to be losing neurons!
        > The sprouted part is called an acrospire - edosperm is the solid
        part.
        > Cannot find a verification of the content of the acrospire which I
        > think I read somewhere (?)
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Undried malted grain is called 'green malt'.It is used in
        moonshine
        > > style spirits, but apparently the endosperm (the sprouted part)
        > > contains unpleasant compounds which might not be a problem for
        > > distillers.


        I don't think it's the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule)
        that's the issue, Wal. It's more a question of economics and yield.

        At the end of the germination period the Acrospire should have grown
        to roughly ? - ¾ the length of the corn. On no account must the
        Acrospire be allowed to grow out of the end of the corn. Such a
        condition, "bolting", results in too much of the food supply
        contained in the Endosperm having been used. This consequently
        creates a high malting loss.

        The moisture content of the grain should still be approximately 41% -
        42% at the end of the germinating period and the Diastatic Power or
        Enzyme development will be at its maximum.

        Source:
        http://www.scotchwhisky.net/manufacturing/


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
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