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Re: Malting question

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  • waljaco
    the Japanese use the high protein and acidic sediment to pickle vegetables. wal ... is ... fermented liquid and use part of solids for the next batch. The
    Message 1 of 37 , Dec 1, 2004
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      the Japanese use the high protein and acidic sediment to pickle
      vegetables.
      wal
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Forsberg <andrew@u...>
      wrote:
      > If your wash has fully converted and fermented the grain then there
      is
      > nothing useful left in the solids at the end. There may be some
      > beneficial nutrients for your garden or compost however.
      >
      > Cheers
      > Andrew
      >
      >
      > On Wed, 2004-12-01 at 19:08 -0800, _{*L*}_ wrote:
      > >
      > > I believe so. After one batch is finished you can remove
      fermented liquid and use part of solids for the next batch. The other
      part can be consumed. There are many recipes using this solid mass.
      > >
      > > Brendan Keith <bkeith@s...> wrote:
      > > I understand that additional batches of cooked rice can be added
      at intervals. Correct?
      > >
    • Harry
      ... part. ... moonshine ... I don t think it s the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule) that s the issue, Wal. It s more a question of economics and
      Message 37 of 37 , Dec 4, 2004
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > Must stop relying on memory as I appear to be losing neurons!
        > The sprouted part is called an acrospire - edosperm is the solid
        part.
        > Cannot find a verification of the content of the acrospire which I
        > think I read somewhere (?)
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Undried malted grain is called 'green malt'.It is used in
        moonshine
        > > style spirits, but apparently the endosperm (the sprouted part)
        > > contains unpleasant compounds which might not be a problem for
        > > distillers.


        I don't think it's the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule)
        that's the issue, Wal. It's more a question of economics and yield.

        At the end of the germination period the Acrospire should have grown
        to roughly ? - ¾ the length of the corn. On no account must the
        Acrospire be allowed to grow out of the end of the corn. Such a
        condition, "bolting", results in too much of the food supply
        contained in the Endosperm having been used. This consequently
        creates a high malting loss.

        The moisture content of the grain should still be approximately 41% -
        42% at the end of the germinating period and the Diastatic Power or
        Enzyme development will be at its maximum.

        Source:
        http://www.scotchwhisky.net/manufacturing/


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
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