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Re: [Distillers] Malting question

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  • Rana Pipiens
    Andrew, I ve grown and eaten both globe and Jerusalem artichokes and, in my opinion, the Jerusalem artichoke tastes like the globe artichoke heart when boiled.
    Message 1 of 37 , Dec 1, 2004
      Andrew, I've grown and eaten both globe and Jerusalem artichokes and, in my opinion, the Jerusalem artichoke tastes like the globe artichoke heart when boiled. If you get a chance check out some of the other things that Jack uses to make wine. I've been told by a home winemaking shop owner that he really knows what he is talking about. Rana

      Andrew Forsberg <andrew@...> wrote:Good grief, Hector, you're right! Cynar's a 16.5% Italian liqueur based
      on artichokes.

      The artichokes I have growing are globe artichokes -- not the Jerusalem
      artichoke tubers. I've never tried Jerusalem artichokes, so don't know
      how they compare flavour-wise, but I'm having a really hard time
      imagining how a globe artichoke wine would taste. My wife said it would
      be disgusting, and a waste. :) Of course, I'm also extremely bloody
      minded so am going to give it a go anyway.

      Cheers!
      Andrew






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    • Harry
      ... part. ... moonshine ... I don t think it s the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule) that s the issue, Wal. It s more a question of economics and
      Message 37 of 37 , Dec 4, 2004
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > Must stop relying on memory as I appear to be losing neurons!
        > The sprouted part is called an acrospire - edosperm is the solid
        part.
        > Cannot find a verification of the content of the acrospire which I
        > think I read somewhere (?)
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Undried malted grain is called 'green malt'.It is used in
        moonshine
        > > style spirits, but apparently the endosperm (the sprouted part)
        > > contains unpleasant compounds which might not be a problem for
        > > distillers.


        I don't think it's the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule)
        that's the issue, Wal. It's more a question of economics and yield.

        At the end of the germination period the Acrospire should have grown
        to roughly ? - ¾ the length of the corn. On no account must the
        Acrospire be allowed to grow out of the end of the corn. Such a
        condition, "bolting", results in too much of the food supply
        contained in the Endosperm having been used. This consequently
        creates a high malting loss.

        The moisture content of the grain should still be approximately 41% -
        42% at the end of the germinating period and the Diastatic Power or
        Enzyme development will be at its maximum.

        Source:
        http://www.scotchwhisky.net/manufacturing/


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
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