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Re: [Distillers] Malting question

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  • Rana Pipiens
    Andrew, I ve grown and eaten both globe and Jerusalem artichokes and, in my opinion, the Jerusalem artichoke tastes like the globe artichoke heart when boiled.
    Message 1 of 37 , Dec 1, 2004
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      Andrew, I've grown and eaten both globe and Jerusalem artichokes and, in my opinion, the Jerusalem artichoke tastes like the globe artichoke heart when boiled. If you get a chance check out some of the other things that Jack uses to make wine. I've been told by a home winemaking shop owner that he really knows what he is talking about. Rana

      Andrew Forsberg <andrew@...> wrote:Good grief, Hector, you're right! Cynar's a 16.5% Italian liqueur based
      on artichokes.

      The artichokes I have growing are globe artichokes -- not the Jerusalem
      artichoke tubers. I've never tried Jerusalem artichokes, so don't know
      how they compare flavour-wise, but I'm having a really hard time
      imagining how a globe artichoke wine would taste. My wife said it would
      be disgusting, and a waste. :) Of course, I'm also extremely bloody
      minded so am going to give it a go anyway.

      Cheers!
      Andrew






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    • Harry
      ... part. ... moonshine ... I don t think it s the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule) that s the issue, Wal. It s more a question of economics and
      Message 37 of 37 , Dec 4, 2004
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > Must stop relying on memory as I appear to be losing neurons!
        > The sprouted part is called an acrospire - edosperm is the solid
        part.
        > Cannot find a verification of the content of the acrospire which I
        > think I read somewhere (?)
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Undried malted grain is called 'green malt'.It is used in
        moonshine
        > > style spirits, but apparently the endosperm (the sprouted part)
        > > contains unpleasant compounds which might not be a problem for
        > > distillers.


        I don't think it's the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule)
        that's the issue, Wal. It's more a question of economics and yield.

        At the end of the germination period the Acrospire should have grown
        to roughly ? - ¾ the length of the corn. On no account must the
        Acrospire be allowed to grow out of the end of the corn. Such a
        condition, "bolting", results in too much of the food supply
        contained in the Endosperm having been used. This consequently
        creates a high malting loss.

        The moisture content of the grain should still be approximately 41% -
        42% at the end of the germinating period and the Diastatic Power or
        Enzyme development will be at its maximum.

        Source:
        http://www.scotchwhisky.net/manufacturing/


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
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