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Re: Malting question

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  • auldfardt
    Hi Héctor, Could you please give me some more information about making a mango wash. Are you saying that no flavour will come through in the distilate? I hope
    Message 1 of 37 , Dec 1, 2004
      Hi Héctor,

      Could you please give me some more information about making a mango
      wash.

      Are you saying that no flavour will come through in the distilate?

      I hope that this is not the case because I have 120 beautiful big
      mangos ripening that I intended to use for making a wash (It's mango
      season here in North Queensland, Australia)

      Greg (AuldFardt)

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Héctor A. Landaeta C."
      <coloniera@c...> wrote:
      > There are a few
      > exceptions like mangoes, pears, apples and strawberries that don¹t
      produce
      > any extract. All of the other fruits do. Isn¹t there a famous
      European
      > brand of artichoke liqueur called ³Cynar²? Do try it Andrew and
      let us
      > know.
      > Salud!
      > --
      > Héctor Landaeta
      > Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Harry
      ... part. ... moonshine ... I don t think it s the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule) that s the issue, Wal. It s more a question of economics and
      Message 37 of 37 , Dec 4, 2004
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > Must stop relying on memory as I appear to be losing neurons!
        > The sprouted part is called an acrospire - edosperm is the solid
        part.
        > Cannot find a verification of the content of the acrospire which I
        > think I read somewhere (?)
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Undried malted grain is called 'green malt'.It is used in
        moonshine
        > > style spirits, but apparently the endosperm (the sprouted part)
        > > contains unpleasant compounds which might not be a problem for
        > > distillers.


        I don't think it's the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule)
        that's the issue, Wal. It's more a question of economics and yield.

        At the end of the germination period the Acrospire should have grown
        to roughly ? - ¾ the length of the corn. On no account must the
        Acrospire be allowed to grow out of the end of the corn. Such a
        condition, "bolting", results in too much of the food supply
        contained in the Endosperm having been used. This consequently
        creates a high malting loss.

        The moisture content of the grain should still be approximately 41% -
        42% at the end of the germinating period and the Diastatic Power or
        Enzyme development will be at its maximum.

        Source:
        http://www.scotchwhisky.net/manufacturing/


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
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