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Malting question

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  • bluejakeditto
    Every thing I ve read indicate a 3-step process in malting. 1)Sprouting 2)Drying 3)Crushing/Gristing If you time your use of the malted grain as soon as it
    Message 1 of 37 , Nov 30, 2004
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      Every thing I've read indicate a 3-step process in malting.
      1)Sprouting
      2)Drying
      3)Crushing/Gristing

      If you time your use of the malted grain as soon as it sprouts, are
      steps 2 & 3 necessary. Does drying first increase the enzynes's
      effectiveness?

      Could you for instance sprout corn and mash it immediately without
      drying or adding enzynes? Would it convert itself?

      Thanks for any responses.

      Roy
    • Harry
      ... part. ... moonshine ... I don t think it s the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule) that s the issue, Wal. It s more a question of economics and
      Message 37 of 37 , Dec 4, 2004
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > Must stop relying on memory as I appear to be losing neurons!
        > The sprouted part is called an acrospire - edosperm is the solid
        part.
        > Cannot find a verification of the content of the acrospire which I
        > think I read somewhere (?)
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Undried malted grain is called 'green malt'.It is used in
        moonshine
        > > style spirits, but apparently the endosperm (the sprouted part)
        > > contains unpleasant compounds which might not be a problem for
        > > distillers.


        I don't think it's the composition of the acrospire (aka plumule)
        that's the issue, Wal. It's more a question of economics and yield.

        At the end of the germination period the Acrospire should have grown
        to roughly ? - ¾ the length of the corn. On no account must the
        Acrospire be allowed to grow out of the end of the corn. Such a
        condition, "bolting", results in too much of the food supply
        contained in the Endosperm having been used. This consequently
        creates a high malting loss.

        The moisture content of the grain should still be approximately 41% -
        42% at the end of the germinating period and the Diastatic Power or
        Enzyme development will be at its maximum.

        Source:
        http://www.scotchwhisky.net/manufacturing/


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
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