Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Cullulase?

Expand Messages
  • Gregory Bloom
    Hmmm... Their Si-Lo-Fame PLUS products include lactic-acid producing bacteria, which will ferment the 5 and 6 carbon sugars produced by cellulase and
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 29, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hmmm... Their Si-Lo-Fame PLUS products include lactic-acid producing
      bacteria, which will ferment the 5 and 6 carbon sugars produced by
      cellulase and hemicellulase into lactic acid. They explain that,
      unlike humans who kinda like the taste of acetic acid and ethanol,
      animals don't care for vinegar or booze, but they do really like
      lactic acid. Their non-PLUS products have only the enzymes, without
      the lactic acid producing bacteria.

      At any rate, the fuel ethanol producers are all real big advocates of
      using cellulase to produce ethanol. Here's a slideshow (PDF) that
      apparently went along with a lecture on the subject:
      http://tinyurl.com/4abxt

      They're apparently using special bacteria to ferment the 5-carbon
      sugars from hemicellulase, but they're just using good old
      Saccharomyces cervisiae (yeast) to ferment the 6-carbon sugars they
      get from cellulase. So it sounds as though one could use just
      cellulase to get the 6-carbon sugars that yeast like, and though you
      would be losing out on all the 5-carbon sugars you could get, it is
      still a huge bargain. Heck, I hate to think how many liters of
      potential ethonol we throw away just from our daily newspapers.

      I don't know how much cellulase costs, but wouldn't it be fun to turn
      old newsprint into excellent vodka? Almost like turning lead into
      gold.



      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "ajdonnison" <adam@s...> wrote:
      >
      > From the information on the website this stuff is designed to
      produce
      > lactic acid, which is not going to ferment into alcohol. The main
      > reason they ferment silage is to provide a protective, anti-
      bacterial
      > environment that is safe for animals to eat. Hence the lactic acid
      > and carbon dioxide are useful fermentation products, alcohol is not.
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Gregory Bloom" <gjbloom@y...>
      wrote:
      > >
      > > There's a product sold to ranchers in the US called Si-Lo-Fame
      > > http://www.mmbiotech.com/forage_additives1.htm
      > > that appears to contain not only alpha and beta amylase, but
      > > cellulase and hemicellulase as well. Seems like a fellow could
      > > ferment almost any plant substance with this stuff - even lawn
      > > clippings! Has anyone tried using cellulase enzymes to produce
      > > fermentable sugars for distilling?
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.