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Re: Opinions please....

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  • Sven Pfitt
    ... I dassagree. High ABV wine and beer have been around for over a hundred years without the assistance of modern technology. Time may well be the biggest
    Message 1 of 26 , Nov 22, 2004
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mwmccaw" <mwmccaw@y...> wrote:
      > > There are several reasons that a commercial whiskey maker might
      > > use a lower ABV wash.
      > > Energy has already been mentioned as a negative, BUT a large,
      > > commercial establishment can afford heat exchangers and the
      > > engineering to minimize loss of energy to the environment, so
      > > that is actually less of a negative than many of us suppose.
      ...snip...
      > > Cheers,
      > > Mike McCaw


      > Hi Mike,
      > All valid reasons, methinks. Thank you. I've got a sneaking
      > suspicion it's also a combination of traditions and modern
      > chemistry knowledge. In days of yore, the yeast strains were
      > hardly capable of fermenting much over 7 or 8% before they fell
      > over. Then modern methods stepped in and produced strains capable
      > of far more. However this came at a cost, namely the need to add
      > modern high-powered nutrients (aka fertilisers) to feed the yeast.
      ...snip...
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry


      I dassagree. High ABV wine and beer have been around for over a
      hundred years without the assistance of modern technology.

      Time may well be the biggest factor.

      The higher the original gravity of the beer, wash, wine, or whatever
      the longer it takes to ferment completely. Not linearly. It is almost
      logrithmitic.

      A 1.100 Barley Wine does not take twice as long to ferment as a 1.050
      Pale Ale. It takes almost four times as long.

      Given a set of fermenters, boilers, etc you can run more product by
      optimizing the time/%abv ration of your process.

      6% is near the peak of the transfer curve.

      In addition, brewing 6% beer does not stress the yeast as much as
      higher ABV wort. One can reuse the yeast many times without it going
      bad if proper sanitation is adhered to.

      If you drop to 4% and get enough oxigen in the wort, you can actually
      get 24 hr fermentation!

      I have pitched a Pale ale on top of a previous yeast cake and the
      next morning the kreussen was already collapsing. By that evening the
      beer was ready to drop to secondary to let it clarify. The beer was
      carbonated and on tap in five days from the time I started brewing
      it.

      Sven
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