Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Is it possible to recover a culture from a sample of chinese rice wine?

Expand Messages
  • waljaco
    If you add 8% angkak (red fermented rice) to your cooked glutinous rice and Chinese rice balls you should get a similar mash. Some rice wines are fortified in
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 2, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      If you add 8% angkak (red fermented rice) to your cooked glutinous
      rice and Chinese rice balls you should get a similar mash.
      Some rice wines are fortified in a similar way to port wine
      production to obtain sweetness.
      wal
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, BOKAKOB <bokakob@y...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a friend who brought me a small bottle, perhaps 50mL, of
      aged rice wine made with red rice culture. I was told it arrived from
      mainland China where this wine is brewed for centuries. I am not sure
      what culture and yeast were used but the taste is exquisite! It has
      color of regular black tea, rum or regular whiskey. The rice aroma is
      definitely there and there is a strong aftertaste of wine. It is
      pretty strong too. I was told it is aged at least five years in
      bottle without any light. I love it.
      >
      >
      >
      > Now, I want to find out if it is possible to somehow to propagate
      the culture which I suspect is still might be in the solution. The
      wine was made with old recipe and I am almost positive it was not
      pasteurized. So, is there any way to multiply whatever cultures are
      in this wine and continue brewing with this strain?
      >
      >
      >
      > Thank you for any leads because it is worth it! Alex (aka BOKAKOB)
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. - www.yahoo.com/a
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • BOKAKOB
      If you add 8% angkak (red fermented rice) to your cooked glutinous rice and Chinese rice balls you should get a similar mash. Some rice wines are fortified in
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 2, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        If you add 8% angkak (red fermented rice) to your cooked glutinous rice and Chinese rice balls you should get a similar mash. Some rice wines are fortified in a similar way to port wine production to obtain sweetness. wal
        =================================================
        Hi, Wal! after u mentioned word "fortified" I think I know that that particular sample was fortified. That is why it was pretty strong and had wine aftertaste. Thanks for very good links. Alex.




        Whatever I wrote above is my subjective opinion
        There are no warranties of any kind
        Act on your own risk and finally...
        I can be wrong I must say
        Cheers, Alex...





        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.