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220 litre Sugar/Molasses wash recipe?

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  • Spencer Ostrom
    Scored (6) 220liter food grade plastic barrels used once to ship brandy from France. Cost 6X15=$90 Canadian. Got steel to build an apple smasher for $20 so
    Message 1 of 42 , Sep 28, 2004
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      Scored (6) 220liter food grade plastic barrels used once to ship brandy from France. Cost 6X15=$90 Canadian.

      Got steel to build an apple smasher for $20 so should be juicing apples Monday. Will post pics when done.

      I need some feedstock ASAP and want to get a large amount of sugar wash ready quick.

      Anybody have recipe/process suggestions for a 220 liter sugar/molasses wash? I was thinking on the order of 40kg sugar/40kg molasses. Seems alot! I have some yeast on order from Brewhaus yet to arrive. I suspect I will have to add the total fermentables in stages to safeguard the temperature and avoid a yeast kill.

      Could rig a coiling coil if needed during primary fermentation.

      As always all input and advice is greatly appreciated.

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    • Héctor A. Landaeta C.
      Hola gente! I¹ve just received a magisterial class of emulsifiers by a couple of Phd¹s on that precise subject (the ones I told you before that invented
      Message 42 of 42 , Oct 5, 2004
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        Hola gente!
        I¹ve just received a magisterial class of emulsifiers by a couple of Phd¹s
        on that precise subject (the ones I told you before that invented
        Orimulsion, the heavy oil and water fuel-oil substitute). Having presented
        myself to them as the lowest of the low layman in the area (and with a low
        IQ as a garnish) I received some pretty interesting data in the simplest
        terms: It seems there¹s basically two types of emulsifiers, ones that are
        meant to to be used in a fat in water context and others in a water in fat
        context; it all depends of the fat to water ratio. In the case of
        chocolate (the solid one that comes in bars) that¹s a water in fat scenario,
        and in that case you must use an emulsifier which has more water than fat
        affinity, like lecithin. In the case of a fat based liquor (like my
        chocolate liquor) the right emulsifier is one that exhibits more fat
        affinity (the recipe calls for 600 ml of H2O per liter), and the
        best/cheapest/stablest in the context is Polysorbate 60. In the ice-cream
        and bakery industries there¹s a widespread use of a brother of this
        substance, Polysorbate 80, but this emulsifier serves other conditions (or
        so I¹m told).
        Sodium caseinate applies, almost exclusively, to liquors whose fat content
        is milk fat (cream) based.
        They told me that the usage threshold of soy lecithin in a liquid scenario
        like mine is like 300-700 ppm and that by using 3 ml per liter I was using
        about 60.000 ppm! (and it didn¹t work, by the way, it did separate at less
        than 24 hours).
        It happens that they had a bucket full of the stuff I needed (looks exactly
        like vaseline) and they gave me a generous helping to test on a range of 0,5
        to 3 grams per liter, to keep things in a conservative side. Polysorbate 60
        costs like 25% of what soy lecithin does in our local market.
        They emphasized the role of mixing and the sequence in which you introduce
        the elements. If you¹re using the fat in water type of emulsifiers you
        should start by mixing it with the water and watery ingredients and add the
        fat substances last (if using the other type, then by the inverse).
        Agitation should be done by means that introduce the less air possible (told
        me the hand blender was the best choice and that the vortex implied in
        blender mixing was no good because of that). Also told me that it should be
        mixed for a period of no less than 5 minutes.
        Thanks again to all that gave their advice. The final recipes I would
        publish by the day past tomorrow to give time for tests in progress to give
        their final verdict.
        Salud amigos!
        --
        Héctor Landaeta
        Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



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