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Re: [Distillers] Re: Making a hydrometer and/or alcoholometer

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  • Andrew Forsberg
    Lindsay, I thought the basic problem was quite straightforward, obviously not: 1) Is your drinking straw PP? 2) How do you know? From what I ve seen they can
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 30, 2004
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      Lindsay,

      I thought the basic problem was quite straightforward, obviously not:

      1) Is your drinking straw PP?
      2) How do you know? From what I've seen they can be made of PS or any
      number of other types of plastic.
      3) Are the dyes and pigments on the drinking straw are food grade for
      *this* sort of application?
      4) What has dioxins got to do with it? Why didn't you try the search?
      http://www.jhsph.edu/Press_Room/articles/Halden_dioxins.html
      By the sounds of it that's too much of an effort, so here's the relevant
      part:

      ----

      *OC&PA: /What about cooking with plastics?/*

      *RH:* In general, whenever you heat something you increase the
      likelihood of pulling chemicals out. Chemicals can be released from
      plastic packaging materials like the kinds used in some microwave meals.
      Some drinking straws say on the label “not for hot beverages.” Most
      people think the warning is because someone might be burned. If you put
      that straw into a boiling cup of hot coffee, you basically have a hot
      water extraction going on, where the chemicals in the straw are being
      extracted into your nice cup of coffee. We use the same process in the
      lab to extract chemicals from materials we want to analyze.

      If you are cooking with plastics or using plastic utensils, the best
      thing to do is to follow the directions and only use plastics that are
      specifically meant for cooking. Inert containers are best, for example
      heat-resistant glass, ceramics and good old stainless steel.

      ----

      Next you'll say 'but I'm not cooking with it' and bokakob's file shows
      PP is fine in alc to 50 deg C. So either Johns Hopkins Bloomsburg School
      of Public Health is wrong, or Bokakob is wrong, or drinking straws are
      not all made of high grade pp...

      However, you've already decided I'm a quack who hides under bushes (and
      also uses organic grains so must be a right fruitcake)... While to me
      it's simple common sense that tells me not to use an unknown quantity
      like a drinking straw in 96% alcohol. Besides which -- the straw I left
      overnight in alc is extensively distorted. Each to their own, but I sure
      as @#$@ won't be drinking that.

      Cheers
      Andrew


      Lindsay Williams wrote:

      >Sorry, but I have done quite a bit of searching on plastics and
      >ethanol. There is a file on new distillers put there by Bokakob which
      >shows PP is not affected by 96% etho at either 20 deg or 50 deg after
      >30 days of constant exposure. Several other sources say similar things.
      >
      >Like your first posting you supply info pertaining to substances other
      >than PP. (What has dioxin or crap on mirrors got to do with PP?). If
      >you can find some evidence pertaining to PP I am sure we would like to
      >see it. Until then, I will stick with what researchers who actually
      >test PP say.
      >
      >Now the above doesn't mean that I am an advocate of plastic where high
      >abv stuff is present but I am also not going to hide under a bush when
      >someone calls out the bogey-man!
      >
      >
      >
      >
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