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reusing yeast

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  • Thomas Hart
    I have to jump into this one with my two cents. I have been a commercial brewer for about nine years and have won numerous awards with the beer I produce. I
    Message 1 of 5 , May 2, 2001
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      I have to jump into this one with my two cents.

      I have been a commercial brewer for about nine years and have won numerous
      awards with the beer I produce. I say this not to boast, but because I
      regularly reuse yeast and don't have any problems related to this practice.

      Yeast is a mean little creature and if it is given half a chance it will
      dominate its environment, killing off other bacteria and such. I have found
      that the greatest enemy of a brewer is lag time, or in other words, a delay
      between the time yeast is pitched and when it is in full ferment. It is
      during this time that all of those little wild beast that we don't want to
      dominate do their work. Many of these produce off-flavors that can be
      detected in very small amounts. Every "honest" brewer I know admits there
      are some of these in their brew. The trick is pitching enough yeast to
      insure that the beasts you want (your yeast) takes over.

      I have found the problem often comes when people use too little yeast, don't
      build it up correctly or do not aerate their wort enough. Many fear they
      will contaminate their batch through aeration, I say, the benefits far out
      weigh the risks. So, use clean and sanitary procedures and don't worry
      about it. This is by far the practice of the vast majority of
      micro-breweries.

      Hope this helps.

      Peace- Tom
      the Stillpastor
    • Ted Palmer
      I have found the problem often comes when people use too little yeast, don t build it up correctly or do not aerate their wort enough. You hit the nail on the
      Message 2 of 5 , May 3, 2001
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        I have found the problem often comes when people use too little yeast, don't
        build it up correctly or do not aerate their wort enough. 
        You hit the nail on the head!
        I used to brew for the Thomas Kemper brewery and they were bought by Hart Brewing but the name didn't change to Thomas Hart Brewing. Perhaps it should have! :)
        _____________
        Ted Palmer
        tpalmer@...
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2001 1:01 PM
        Subject: [Distillers] reusing yeast

        I have to jump into this one with my two cents. 

        I have been a commercial brewer for about nine years and have won numerous
        awards with the beer I produce.  I say this not to boast, but because I
        regularly reuse yeast and don't have any problems related to this practice.

        Yeast is a mean little creature and if it is given half a chance it will
        dominate its environment, killing off other bacteria and such.  I have found
        that the greatest enemy of a brewer is lag time, or in other words, a delay
        between the time yeast is pitched and when it is in full ferment.  It is
        during this time that all of those little wild beast that we don't want to
        dominate do their work.  Many of these produce off-flavors that can be
        detected in very small amounts.  Every "honest" brewer I know admits there
        are some of these in their brew.  The trick is pitching enough yeast to
        insure that the beasts you want (your yeast) takes over.

        I have found the problem often comes when people use too little yeast, don't
        build it up correctly or do not aerate their wort enough.  Many fear they
        will contaminate their batch through aeration, I say, the benefits far out
        weigh the risks.  So, use clean and sanitary procedures and don't worry
        about it.  This is by far the practice of the vast majority of
        micro-breweries.

        Hope this helps.

        Peace- Tom
        the Stillpastor




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      • crack
        i like to make bourbon but i always use fresh yeast, how do i go about reusing what is in the mash, and do i have to add any fresh??
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 29, 2004
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          i like to make bourbon but i always use fresh yeast, how do i go
          about reusing what is in the mash, and do i have to add any fresh??
        • Scott Petrinec
          Keep the sludge that is on the bottom of the fermenter, add new wash to it, don t add any more yeast. crack wrote:i like to make
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 29, 2004
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            Keep the sludge that is on the bottom of the fermenter, add new wash to it, don't add any more yeast.

            crack <stinkypeepuss@...> wrote:i like to make bourbon but i always use fresh yeast, how do i go
            about reusing what is in the mash, and do i have to add any fresh??




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          • Spencer Ostrom
            From what I know each time you brew yeast multiplies. Only a small portion of yeast from a preceeding brew is required for to start the next. Even in
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 3, 2004
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              From what I know each time you brew yeast multiplies.

              Only a small portion of yeast from a preceeding brew is required for to start the next. Even in continuous batch fermentation provision is made to draw off yeast.

              Also be aware that yeast will mutate after multiple generations perhaps developing undesirable properties. I do know that using some yeast from a preceeding brew will work for about 4-5 times from the original culture without problem.

              A benefit of doing this is that as long as the same brew is being made under the same environmental conditions the fermentation time will decrease as the yeast adapts.


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