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Re: Keg fittings (Hot water systems)

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  • rodmacd2000
    Please don t even think of using a *used* water heater as boiler. I recently watched an episode of This Old House on PBS which showed a cut open old water
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 12, 2004
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      Please don't even think of using a *used* water heater as boiler. I
      recently watched an episode of "This Old House" on PBS which showed a
      cut open old water heater which had exceeded the life time of
      its "sacrificial anode". It was disgusting.

      Don't forget that you can always run a 220 volt heater element at 110
      volts resulting in a power usage 25% of the 220 volt value. Eg. in
      your case the 3.6 kW @ 220 volt element would yield 900 watts @ 110
      volts - a reasonable value for eg. a 1.5" column.

      I only have personal experience with a sugar wash and can assure you
      that a water heater works just fine for this. Of course it is
      adviseable to *thoroughly* backflush your column and rinse your
      boiler with hot water after each use. I also know that Ian Smiley
      (author of "Making Pure Corn Whiskey") suggests the use of a water
      heater as boiler.

      The small side entry electrical water heaters which I'm familiar with
      have no extensive internal plumbing to be concernned with. Top entry
      systems on the other hand have an internal pipe which brings incoming
      cold water to the bottom of the tank.

      Finally I might add that both John Stone (who sells his magnificent
      glass still) and Mike Nixon (who sells the PDA-1 still) recommend
      the use of a water heater as boiler for the home distiller.

      My advise and experience FWIW.

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "justin_dittmann"
      <justin_dittmann@y...> wrote:
      > I actually have one of these undersink hot water systems that I
      > scored for nothing out of a bin (just like the one in Making Pure
      > Corn Whiskey). I actually grabbed it for the element so I could use
      > it in my hot liquor tank for my all grain brewery however the
      > element is a 3.6kW (240V) item and draws too much current for the
      > household circuit (if just using a power point, 240V 10A house
      > circuit). However seeing as it cost me nothing replacing the
      element
      > with a smaller one is a financially viable option if I can find
      one.
      >
      > My question is though, are these hot water systems any good for
      > doing batches that you distill with the grain still in the mash?
      I'm
      > guessing you can't really do this due to stuff burning on the
      > element and the difficulty in getting all the crap out afterwards
      > but I'm interested to see how well these things clean out. What
      > about with sugar washes or filtered all malt mashes, do you have
      > problems cleaning them out? I can also see a number of plastic
      pipes
      > that go around in various places inside the hot water system that
      > I'm guessing you can't get out, do these affect anything and will
      > they stand up to the high alcohol and temps?
      >
      > Just after some opinions and info from people that use them.
      >
      > Thanks, Justin
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rodmacd2000" <rmacdoug@r...>
      > wrote:
      > > An alternative to all this is to simply use an "under the
      counter"
      > > or "point of use" water heater as your boiler. These are about
      22"
      > > high and come with capacity ranging from 25 to about 100 liters.
      > > Price is in range Can $125 - $200 including heater element.
      > >
      > > Any decent quality such water heater has a glass-lined steel
      tank,
      > > good insulation, an attractive white-enameled sheet metal housing
      > and
      > > all required 3/4" pipe piercings for draining etc.
      > >
      > > Making such a water heater *fully* functional as still boiler
      > > requires only a few items easily available at Home Depot (eg. a
      > > couple of 3/4" ball valves) and a few simple tools which we all
      > have
      > > at home.
      > >
      > > I really can't understand why so many hobbyists insist on
      adapting
      > a
      > > beer keg, pressure cooker etc as boiler when they have this
      simple
      > > solution readily available.
      > >
      > > My experience and opinion FWIW.
      > >
      > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mdistiller" <mdistiller@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > Take a look a the beer, beer & more beer web site. They have
      > all
      > > the stuff you need to do this. Look under Weldless Kits & Kettle
      > > Accessories for weldless stuff and look under Hardware for the
      > > stainless steel half coupling . They have weldless drains,
      > stainless
      > > steel half coupling and more. The way I fixed my element in my
      > keg
      > > is I drilled a 1 3/8" hole ( I think it was 1 3/8") then I got a
      > 1"
      > > stainless steel half coupling, hot water element are (in the USA)
      > 1"
      > > Pipe thread. You then put a good bead of kitchen grade of
      silicone
      > on
      > > the element at the thread base. slip it in to the hole. Then
      this
      > is
      > > a little hard you need to place a bead of silicone on the in side
      > of
      > > the keg were the element has come through the wall of the keg.
      > Don't
      > > let go of the element be sure to hold it in place. After all is
      > > silicone up thread your Stainless steel half-coupler on the
      > element.
      > > use a element socket to tighten the element-up while holding the
      > > coupling. This should fix you-up. Here is the link to there site:
      > > >
      > > > http://www.morebeer.com/
      > > >
      > > > I highly recommend this site I have done a lot of business with
      > > them and they are great.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Master Distiller
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Do you folks know of anyway to install fittings such as for a
      > > heating
      > > > element, drain and the like without welding? To your
      > experience,
      > > are
      > > > the walls of a keg too rounded to accept a compression
      > fitting?
      > > Just
      > > > fish'n :-] Thanks
      > > >
      > > > SS
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
      > > > FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org
      > > >
      > > >
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