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Re: Steaming large quantities of rice

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  • waljaco
    The water comes to the boil producing steam. Heating then stopped. Rice absorbs water vapour. The time and water quantity determines the fluffy character
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 30, 2004
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      The water comes to the boil producing steam. Heating then stopped.
      Rice absorbs water vapour. The time and water quantity determines
      the 'fluffy' character wanted - i.e. we want individual grains on
      which enzyme producing moulds can grow and convert starch to sugars.
      If its 'gluggy' we do not have enough surface area and thus is not
      very effective.
      wal
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Forsberg <andrew@u...>
      wrote:
      > Hi Wal,
      >
      > > The absorption method is nearly identical to steaming and has the
      > > added value that you know the amount of water absorbed.
      >
      > I can't quite see how they can be nearly identical when the
      absorption
      > method involves the grain being submerged in very hot water, while
      > steamed rice is exposed only to hot vapour. The resulting rice
      looks,
      > feels, and tastes different which has to affect the resulting wine.
      >
      >
      > >The mould produces the conversion enzymes which are superior to
      > >malting. But malting raw rice is not an effective method.
      Obviously
      > >you need water and yeast to ferment it.
      > >
      > The recipes on the site we were discussing refer to kome-koji as
      > 'malt-rice' which, as you know, is not the best of translations!
      Truly
      > malted rice apparently has a very poor diastatic ability anyway.
      >
      > The recipes on the site are interesting because for each type of
      wine or
      > beer you first must have made a starter culture on short grain
      rice. The
      > culture can be stored frozen (!) or simply dried out.
      >
      > http://www.tibbs-vision.com/maltrice/index.html
      > http://www.tibbs-vision.com/sake/instrct.html
      >
      > I want to try making one of these cultures but with the chinese
      wine
      > cakes instead. Not sure how successful it'll be since the rice wine
      > cakes *do* include yeast in addition to the liquefying /
      saccharifying
      > enzymes found in Japanese koji. To start with I will try using the
      > culture fresh on a batch of glutinous rice, but may try storing
      some of
      > it in the freezer just for the hell of it. :-)
      >
      > The other interesting thing about their recipes is that while the
      > starter cultures are prepared at a warm and constant temp of
      30degC,
      > they call for the wines and beers to be fermented at far colder
      5degC to
      > 15degC temps. Can't wait to try it out!
      >
      > Cheers
      > Andrew
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