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Re: Lithuanian beverages

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  • danev2
    Yes We Lithuanians (my self among them) can be proud of the many first accomplishments of our country. We were the first to declare independence from the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 3, 2004
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      Yes We Lithuanians (my self among them) can be proud of the many
      first accomplishments of our country.
      We were the first to declare independence from the soviet Union, we
      have the prettiest girls in Europe (www.pazintys.com) and we nearly
      beat the US olympic "dream team" How many Lith's are playing in the
      NBA now?
      Oh yes, and did I mention we are the greatest distillers in the world?

      Thanks for the article
      Have Fun
      :)

      DV


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
      > The Lithuanian term for vodka is 'degtine' which comes from the
      > root 'degti' which means 'to burn'. Most probably then it is
      derived
      > from the German 'gebrannte wasser/weinbrand' which also is derived
      > from 'to burn'. In Latvian vodka is 'degvins', in Estonian it
      > is 'viin' and in Finnish it is 'viina'. The etymology suggests a
      West
      > European origin for 'degtine' (Lithuanian vodka).
      > wal
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
      > >
      > > A rather overtly ethnocentric view -
      > > http://www.hbhjuozas.lt/iframe.php?view=3_2&lan=en
      > >
      > > wal
    • waljaco
      The Latvian term for vodka is degvins which means literally burnt wine , and is most probably derived from the German branntwein ( brandewijn in Dutch)
      Message 2 of 5 , May 3, 2004
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        The Latvian term for vodka is 'degvins' which means literally 'burnt
        wine', and is most probably derived from the
        German 'branntwein'('brandewijn' in Dutch) which also gave the
        English 'brandywine'(now just 'brandy').
        The Estonians (viin), Finnish (viina) and Russians (vino) have
        retained just the 'wein' part and not the 'burnt' connection.
        The Lithuanian 'degtine' term is similar to the archaic
        Polish 'gorzalka' term from which is derived the Ukrainian
        term 'horilka' both of which are from Slavic verbs 'to burn'.
        Nicholas Faith & Ian Wisniewski in 'Classic Vodka' state:
        "Consequently, it is claimed that the word vodka, and the concept,
        reached Russia from Poland - via Lithuania, Belarus and the Ukraine."
        At the end of the 14th century the Grand Duchy of Lithuania ruled
        Belarus and parts of Ukraine. In 1385 Poland and Lithuania formed a
        confederation. So political, cultural and economic influences existed
        for the above to occur.

        wal

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > The Lithuanian term for vodka is 'degtine' which comes from the
        > root 'degti' which means 'to burn'. Most probably then it is
        derived
        > from the German 'gebrannte wasser/weinbrand' which also is derived
        > from 'to burn'. In Latvian vodka is 'degvins', in Estonian it
        > is 'viin' and in Finnish it is 'viina'. The etymology suggests a
        West
        > European origin for 'degtine' (Lithuanian vodka).
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > A rather overtly ethnocentric view -
        > > http://www.hbhjuozas.lt/iframe.php?view=3_2&lan=en
        > >
        > > wal
      • waljaco
        It has been suggested that Russian distillation started after a Genoese trade mission in 1426. If so one wonders why the term akvavita ( zhizennia voda in
        Message 3 of 5 , May 5, 2004
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          It has been suggested that Russian distillation started after a
          Genoese trade mission in 1426. If so one wonders why the
          term 'akvavita' ('zhizennia voda' in Russian) was not adopted
          commercially as in Denmark and Norway.
          Several Baltic countries were under German rule from the 13th to 16th
          centuries and many Baltic cities belonged in the 15th century to the
          Hansa League. There are several German names for alcoholic
          distillates - 'gebrannte wasser' (from 'aqua ardens'), 'branntwein'
          and 'weinbrand' (brandy-wine). The 'to burn' verb appears to be the
          origin of the archaic Polish term 'gorzale wino'/'gorzalka', the
          Ukrainian 'palene vyno'/'horilka' and the Lithuanian 'degtine'. The
          later Polish term 'wodka' appears to be derived from
          the 'wasser'(water) part of the German 'gebrannte wasser'. Another
          archaic Polish term is 'okowita' which is a corruption of 'aqua
          vitae. There is a written record dated 1405 of distillation in Poland
          and term 'wodka' was first recorded in 1534 whereas in Russia it was
          first recorded in 1751. After the 16th century German rule in the
          Baltics was replaced by Russian rule. The first written record of
          distillation in Estonia is in 1485 and the Estonian term for vodka
          is 'viin' which appears to be derived from the 'wein' part
          of 'branntwein'. In Latvian the term is 'degvins', which is
          equivalent to the German 'branntwein'. As provinces of Russia, Latvia
          and Estonia supplied Russia with over 10% of its total vodka
          requirements and in 1886, 92.5% of spirit imported to St.Petersburg
          was Baltic in origin, mainly Estonian. The Wolfschmidt distillery for
          example was established in 1847 in Latvia and was a supplier to the
          Russian tsars Nikolai 1 and Alexander 111. Interestingly the early
          Russian term for this distillate is 'vino' which corresponds to the
          Estonian term 'viin'. The Polish term 'wodka' entered the Russian
          language in the 18th century when Russia bergan occupying former
          Polish ruled territories.
          It appears to me, based on etymology ('viin'/'vino' and
          later 'wodka'/'vodka'), that commercial distillation reached Russia
          via the Baltic counties, and the earlier term 'vino' was replaced
          by 'vodka' through the influence of Poland or Polish ruled
          territories such as Belarus and parts of Ukraine. Distillation in
          Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania appear to have reached there from
          Poland due to political ties.

          wal

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
          > The Latvian term for vodka is 'degvins' which means
          literally 'burnt
          > wine', and is most probably derived from the
          > German 'branntwein'('brandewijn' in Dutch) which also gave the
          > English 'brandywine'(now just 'brandy').
          > The Estonians (viin), Finnish (viina) and Russians (vino) have
          > retained just the 'wein' part and not the 'burnt' connection.
          > The Lithuanian 'degtine' term is similar to the archaic
          > Polish 'gorzalka' term from which is derived the Ukrainian
          > term 'horilka' both of which are from Slavic verbs 'to burn'.
          > Nicholas Faith & Ian Wisniewski in 'Classic Vodka' state:
          > "Consequently, it is claimed that the word vodka, and the concept,
          > reached Russia from Poland - via Lithuania, Belarus and the
          Ukraine."
          > At the end of the 14th century the Grand Duchy of Lithuania ruled
          > Belarus and parts of Ukraine. In 1385 Poland and Lithuania formed a
          > confederation. So political, cultural and economic influences
          existed
          > for the above to occur.
          >
          > wal
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
          > > The Lithuanian term for vodka is 'degtine' which comes from the
          > > root 'degti' which means 'to burn'. Most probably then it is
          > derived
          > > from the German 'gebrannte wasser/weinbrand' which also is
          derived
          > > from 'to burn'. In Latvian vodka is 'degvins', in Estonian it
          > > is 'viin' and in Finnish it is 'viina'. The etymology suggests a
          > West
          > > European origin for 'degtine' (Lithuanian vodka).
          > > wal
          > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > A rather overtly ethnocentric view -
          > > > http://www.hbhjuozas.lt/iframe.php?view=3_2&lan=en
          > > >
          > > > wal
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