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Re: What happened????

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  • Harry
    ... There are two sources of cloudiness when you cut clear high-proof alcohol. It s either mineral (mostly calcium) in the water, or Fatty Acids in the
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 3 1:47 PM
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "woof117" <woof117@y...> wrote:
      > I took crystal clear distilled sugar wash 170 proof. Cut it to 80
      > proof with crystal clear water and the finished product came out
      > cloudy to the point where I can't see through the bottle. Tastes
      > OK but what the hell went wrong?


      There are two sources of cloudiness when you cut clear high-proof
      alcohol. It's either mineral (mostly calcium) in the water, or
      Fatty Acids in the alcohol.

      There's a simple test you can do to determine the source. Take some
      of your uncut 170 proof and refrigerate it. If it goes hazy, you
      have Fatty Acids. If it stays clear, then your cutting water is
      responsible, and you should use a distilled water.

      Haze is very common in whiskies and spirits not distilled to high
      purity. It's Fatty Acids, one of the congeners which is the group
      of elements in the Whisky that give the actual flavor to it. They
      include aldehydes, esters, fatty acids, oils and phenols. Congeners
      are also partly (besides a shortage of water) responsible for
      hangovers.

      In higher ABV's (like your 170 proof), the spirit is able to keep
      these Fatty Acids dissolved (remember spirit is a good solvent). But
      if the spirit is diluted with water, or chilled, these Fatty Acids
      will clump together, making it 'cloudy' and 'hazy'.

      To prevent this from happening companies chill the Whisky to about
      2degC, and then filter it to remove the Fatty Acids.

      People more into Single Malt Whisky prefer un-chill filtered
      Whiskies, as they believe certain characteristics are being filtered
      away with the fatty acids.

      FWIW, my homebrew whisky has a slight haze which I prefer to leave
      in, as I've tried it filtered and it lacks body. But that's just my
      preference.

      HTH
      Slainte!
      regards Harry
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