Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Thanks Harry...Here's the condensor pics

Expand Messages
  • Harry
    ... Very nice work indeed. A little advice, if I may? The pics are way too high a resolution for web work. That s why they take so long to load and also why
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 29, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Grayson Stewart"
      <grayson_stewart66@y...> wrote:
      > Thanks Harry. I did have the pics on the free yahoo briefcase
      > file. Used your idea about geocities to get these up today.
      >
      > http://tinyurl.com/33be3


      Very nice work indeed.

      A little advice, if I may?
      The pics are way too high a resolution for web work. That's why
      they take so long to load and also why your site is locking out
      viewers.

      The first original pic (condenser_end_view.jpg) is 1632 x 1232 x 230
      dpi x 373 kb.

      I've taken the liberty of running one of the pics through photoshop
      and adjusting it to 400 x 302 x 72 dpi x 24.7 kb. I put it in
      photos so you can compare it...it's in the folder Grayson_Stewart.

      All web jpegs should be 72dpi and about 300 - 400 pixels wide. You
      don't lose definition, but the files are MUCH smaller and load
      faster.

      You can use any of the popular programs to adjust your pics.
      Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro, Irfanview (free) or even Window Paint
      (part of Windows).

      HTH
      Slainte!
      regards Harry

      BTW, nice camera you've got (Kodak Easyshare cx6230 Zoom Digital)
    • jimpuchai
      ... Hello Grayson, I just discovered this recently which may help you. There is an easy Image Resizer as one of the powertoys for WinXP. I have given you a
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
        wrote:

        > You can use any of the popular programs to adjust your pics.
        > Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro, Irfanview (free) or even Window Paint
        > (part of Windows).
        >
        > HTH
        > Slainte!
        > regards Harry
        >
        > BTW, nice camera you've got (Kodak Easyshare cx6230 Zoom Digital

        Hello Grayson,

        I just discovered this recently which may help you. There is an easy
        Image Resizer as one of the powertoys for WinXP.
        I have given you a choice of links. If you download this small
        programme, then execute it, it will add Image Resizer to your right
        click menu in XP. It is simplicity itself. Gives you three choices,
        small, medium and large in jig time.

        I tracked it down when I read a post from a real estate agent. He
        claimed this was the absolute bees knees for his industry. I don't
        think he was wrong, and I know it will surely make your moderator
        happy.


        http://download.microsoft.com/download/whistler/install/2/wxp/en-
        us/imageresizerpowertoysetup.exe

        http://tinyurl.com/2yt2


        This link will take you to the associated descriptive and other
        information on picture sizes.

        http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/downloads/powertoys.asp

        http://tinyurl.com/36n

        Jim P.
      • Derek Hamlet
        Very nice indeed. If I missed the note describing your technique could you repost. If you did not describe your winding method, perhaps you could do so.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Very nice indeed. If I missed the note describing your technique could you
          repost. If you did not describe your winding method, perhaps you could do so.
          Thanks
          At 11:38 PM 29/02/2004, you wrote:
          >--- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Grayson Stewart"
          ><grayson_stewart66@y...> wrote:
          > > Thanks Harry. I did have the pics on the free yahoo briefcase
          > > file. Used your idea about geocities to get these up today.
          > >
          > > http://tinyurl.com/33be3
          >
          >
          >Very nice work indeed.
          >

          Derek Hamlet
          Victoria, B.C.
        • Grayson Stewart
          ... so. Take a 20 foot segment of tubing and completly fill with salt. This requires using a small funnel and tapping the tubing as you fill. I worked from
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            >>If you did not describe your winding method, perhaps you could do
            so.

            Take a 20 foot segment of tubing and completly fill with salt. This
            requires using a small funnel and tapping the tubing as you fill. I
            worked from each end and placed tape over the end not being filled
            at the moment.

            I left a two foot long segment of the tubing uncoiled and taped it
            parallel to the broom stick. This gave me leverage to begin my
            coils and a segment with plenty of length for plumbing up the water
            later. The two foot segment will be the "top" of the condensor, and
            I wound "down" the broomstick....away from the 2 foot long straight
            piece.

            Using the formula for a circle perimeter ( 3.14 times the centerline
            diamter of the coil ) I was able to estimate the length of the
            tubing that I would use going "down" the broomstick and this being
            where I would begin forming the coils back "up" the broomstick.
            Just remember the centerline diamter of the second row of coils will
            be greater than the inner row of coils. My condensor doesn't come
            all the way back to the beginning point, but I chose to do that so I
            could pack a scrubber around the outside of the coils and one down
            the center of the coil to condense any vapor that may try to pass.

            With the two foot of tubing taped to the broom stick, carefully
            begin twisting the tubing around the broom stick going "down". I
            heated the tubing with a propane torch to soften and allow the coils
            to be made a little easier.

            I only heated about a foot of the tubing at a time. As soon as that
            one foot is heated (about a 30 to 45 seconds) I began to make the
            coils. Only forming coils with the length that was heated.

            I used a leather welders glove and would press or force the tubing
            around the broom stick holding the tubing near the broomstick. It
            gets a little warm even with a glove but not too hot to handle.

            After one or two coils are made I would heat up the next one foot
            segment and form more coils. Continue this till you reach your
            return marker that was placed using the formula above.

            Repeat back up the coils already made leaving enough length of
            straight tubing to plumb up the condensor later. Hint: I left the
            salt in the tubing after forming all my coils so I still had the
            benefit of that packing in forming any additional bends I needed
            after placing my 2" cap on.

            Hope this helps!
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.