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bending copper tubing

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  • stephen gardipee
    Does anyone have any simple, yet specific information on annealing copper tubing. For example, can I anneal it in the oven. What temperature does it have to
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 29, 2004
      Does anyone have any simple, yet specific information on annealing copper tubing. For example, can I anneal it in the oven. What temperature does it have to be heated to. Should I heat it with my oxy-acetylene torch. When I try to bend my tubing it crimps. I have some information that I downloaded from homedistiller.org/materials. I guess what I am asking is how do I know That I have heated my copper tubing to a temperature that has properly annealed it.

      Stephen...


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    • Harry
      ... copper tubing. For example, can I anneal it in the oven. What temperature does it have to be heated to. Should I heat it with my oxy-acetylene torch.
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 29, 2004
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, stephen gardipee
        <startingstill@y...> wrote:
        > Does anyone have any simple, yet specific information on annealing
        copper tubing. For example, can I anneal it in the oven. What
        temperature does it have to be heated to. Should I heat it with my
        oxy-acetylene torch. When I try to bend my tubing it crimps. I have
        some information that I downloaded from homedistiller.org/materials.
        I guess what I am asking is how do I know That I have heated my
        copper tubing to a temperature that has properly annealed it.
        >
        > Stephen...


        Hi Stephen,
        Oxy torch (a.k.a. gas axe) is the go.
        The word anneal means to soften thoroughly and render less
        brittle. Copper is unlike steel in many respects. If copper is
        bent often, it could break when you try to bend it again. Should the
        pressure on a copper tube increase or decrease too much, the tube
        could break. Vibration also makes copper tubing break.

        To soften steel, heat it to a cherry red and cool it very slowly.
        The slower it is cooled, the softer the steel becomes.

        With copper, the opposite is true. Copper is heated uniformly to a
        dull red and then quenched (dipped) in water. The faster it is
        cooled, the softer the copper becomes.

        BENDING.—Copper, properly annealed, can be bent by hand when sharp
        bends are not desired. Copper partially collapses during the bending
        process if a tubing bender is not used or if the copper is not
        filled with some kind of easily removable material, such as sand or
        salt. Simple bends can also be made by wrapping the outside of the
        copper tightly with soft wire and bending the copper by hand.

        However, if a line must make a 45- or 90-degree bend, you should use
        a tubing bender. Hand-tubing benders are available for each size of
        copper. These benders assist you in making neat, accurate bends
        easily, quickly, and without marring the copper or restricting the
        flow through the copper. It is easy to make a bend but difficult to
        get the bend in the correct location on the copper and to the
        correct degree.

        Be certain that you have the correct size bender for the copper you
        intend to bend. A bender that is either too small or too large for
        the copper will make a faulty bend.

        HTH
        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • stephen gardipee
        ... copper tubing. For example, can I anneal it in the oven. What temperature does it have to be heated to. Should I heat it with my oxy-acetylene torch.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
          Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, stephen gardipee
          <startingstill@y...> wrote:
          > Does anyone have any simple, yet specific information on annealing
          copper tubing. For example, can I anneal it in the oven. What
          temperature does it have to be heated to. Should I heat it with my
          oxy-acetylene torch. When I try to bend my tubing it crimps. I have
          some information that I downloaded from homedistiller.org/materials.
          I guess what I am asking is how do I know That I have heated my
          copper tubing to a temperature that has properly annealed it.
          >
          > Stephen...


          Hi Stephen,
          Oxy torch (a.k.a. gas axe) is the go.
          The word anneal means to soften thoroughly and render less
          brittle. Copper is unlike steel in many respects. If copper is
          bent often, it could break when you try to bend it again. Should the
          pressure on a copper tube increase or decrease too much, the tube
          could break. Vibration also makes copper tubing break.

          To soften steel, heat it to a cherry red and cool it very slowly.
          The slower it is cooled, the softer the steel becomes.

          With copper, the opposite is true. Copper is heated uniformly to a
          dull red and then quenched (dipped) in water. The faster it is
          cooled, the softer the copper becomes.

          BENDING.�Copper, properly annealed, can be bent by hand when sharp
          bends are not desired. Copper partially collapses during the bending
          process if a tubing bender is not used or if the copper is not
          filled with some kind of easily removable material, such as sand or
          salt. Simple bends can also be made by wrapping the outside of the
          copper tightly with soft wire and bending the copper by hand.

          However, if a line must make a 45- or 90-degree bend, you should use
          a tubing bender. Hand-tubing benders are available for each size of
          copper. These benders assist you in making neat, accurate bends
          easily, quickly, and without marring the copper or restricting the
          flow through the copper. It is easy to make a bend but difficult to
          get the bend in the correct location on the copper and to the
          correct degree.

          Be certain that you have the correct size bender for the copper you
          intend to bend. A bender that is either too small or too large for
          the copper will make a faulty bend.

          HTH
          Slainte!
          regards Harry

          Harry



          Thank you for the information. I was well on my way with my still, then I ran into this problem. I will be posting some pictures of my project in the near future..

          Thanks again,

          Stephen







          S

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          FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org





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        • Grayson Stewart
          ... copper tubing. With alot of help, I just recently got the pictures of my condensor loaded up in the photo section under grayson_stewart. After wasting
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, stephen gardipee
            <startingstill@y...> wrote:
            > Does anyone have any simple, yet specific information on annealing
            copper tubing.

            With alot of help, I just recently got the pictures of my condensor
            loaded up in the photo section under grayson_stewart.

            After wasting several lengths of tubing I finally followed the
            advice I had been given and filled the tubing with salt. It takes a
            little time to make sure it is completley filled but well worth the
            effort. Nobody wants a flat kink halfway through a perfect
            condensor! I then heated the tubing as I twisted it around a broom
            handle.

            I simply heated my salt filled tubing with a propane torch. Placed
            hottest part of the flame (blue tip) along the straight tubing
            closest to the broom handle and ran it over a segment about 8 to 10
            inches. Needless to say, you will want leather gloves while doing
            this.

            True annealing is when heat is applied to the metal to remove any
            cold hardening and realign the microscopic lattice structure of the
            metal making the metal more mallable. What I was doing with the
            propane torch is simply softening the metal to make it easier to
            bend. Making it easier to bend gives you more control in making
            tight coils.

            Now when I say softening, it definately isn't going to become limp -
            but it will be easier to form the tight coils required. I still
            took a break every ten coils or so to rest my forearms.

            Copper is a great conductor and readily dissipates the heat, so I
            only heated enough of the material to form two or three coils that
            you can see in the pictures and then reheated another short segment
            to continue making more coils.

            Just as with anything else, you will need to play with it to get a
            feel for the way it should work. If it's still too difficult to
            form, heat a little longer or try heating a smaller portion and only
            work one coil, then repeat for another coil.

            I seriously doubt you would get enough heat from the oven to do alot
            of good and, if your doing a condensor, all that heat stored in the
            metal will quickly dissipate....besides, I know I wouldn't want to
            work with 20 feet of 500 degree F metal.
          • stephen gardipee
            ... copper tubing. With alot of help, I just recently got the pictures of my condensor loaded up in the photo section under grayson_stewart. After wasting
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
              Grayson Stewart <grayson_stewart66@...> wrote:
              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, stephen gardipee
              <startingstill@y...> wrote:
              > Does anyone have any simple, yet specific information on annealing
              copper tubing.

              With alot of help, I just recently got the pictures of my condensor
              loaded up in the photo section under grayson_stewart.

              After wasting several lengths of tubing I finally followed the
              advice I had been given and filled the tubing with salt. It takes a
              little time to make sure it is completley filled but well worth the
              effort. Nobody wants a flat kink halfway through a perfect
              condensor! I then heated the tubing as I twisted it around a broom
              handle.

              I simply heated my salt filled tubing with a propane torch. Placed
              hottest part of the flame (blue tip) along the straight tubing
              closest to the broom handle and ran it over a segment about 8 to 10
              inches. Needless to say, you will want leather gloves while doing
              this.

              True annealing is when heat is applied to the metal to remove any
              cold hardening and realign the microscopic lattice structure of the
              metal making the metal more mallable. What I was doing with the
              propane torch is simply softening the metal to make it easier to
              bend. Making it easier to bend gives you more control in making
              tight coils.

              Now when I say softening, it definately isn't going to become limp -
              but it will be easier to form the tight coils required. I still
              took a break every ten coils or so to rest my forearms.

              Copper is a great conductor and readily dissipates the heat, so I
              only heated enough of the material to form two or three coils that
              you can see in the pictures and then reheated another short segment
              to continue making more coils.

              Just as with anything else, you will need to play with it to get a
              feel for the way it should work. If it's still too difficult to
              form, heat a little longer or try heating a smaller portion and only
              work one coil, then repeat for another coil.

              I seriously doubt you would get enough heat from the oven to do alot
              of good and, if your doing a condensor, all that heat stored in the
              metal will quickly dissipate....besides, I know I wouldn't want to
              work with 20 feet of 500 degree F metal.


              Thank you Grayson..I appreciate the help.

              Stephen




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              FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



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