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Re: Australian Treasure.

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  • jimpuchai
    ... without a permit or being certified.
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 27, 2004
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      >Carcinogens would definitely put me off the treasure hunt ;-) <


      >the problem arises when you try to dispose of the stuff
      without a permit or being certified.<

      Which brings us to the second reason to give the insulated tanks a
      miss.

      There are in place, mechanisms for disposing of small amounts of
      asbestos. Sensibly, they are there to encourage proper disposal.
      Sadly, in some cases, they seem to have been manipulated by people
      who know the regulations, but only present to the public a version
      that results in maximum profit for themselves.
      I am referring to the practise, by some, of telling people they
      cannot accept asbestos, however well protected, that is transported
      in private vehicles, but they are happy to come and pick up for a
      considerable fee. If you fall for this deceit, you may well pay for
      your tank 8 times over. The typical boot load price quoted is around
      $75 if you pack and transport.

      The quote below from "Confederaterebel" is good advice

      >>>asbestos is easily removed if one knows how to. if asbestos is
      kept wet there
      will be no dust. dust mask, gloves, and cheap paper suits can be
      worn while
      removing the stuff.<<<

      If you really MUST deal with this material, here is a further
      suggestion or nine.

      Before you do anything else, fill the space between inner and outer
      tank with water until it overflows from the highest spot.

      Allow the water to drain away through some holes drilled very close
      to the bottom.

      Use a SMALL wheel on your angle grinder and make 6 equi-spaced
      vertical cuts top to bottom on the steel jacket.

      Remove the screws holding the top plate of the outer jacket.

      Remove from the work area all electrical tools and leave only the
      hand tools required to finish the job.

      Have eight or so TOUGH garden clean-up bags ready

      Set up a temporary sprinkler rose over the work area.

      Strip to your skivvies keeping some old shoes on.

      With the sprinkler running, you can now remove the top plate, bend
      or walk down the 6 steel "petals" and start loading the bags. When
      PART filled, start another bag. Do not overfill. These critters will
      be heavy. Meticulous clean-up is the order of the day. Remember,
      anything that you don't collect into the bags, will dry into fluff
      and be blowing around your property. When done, tie off your bags
      and then double bag them.

      Finally, a good shower under the sprinkler without your skivvies,
      wave to the neighbours to let them know you appreciate their
      interest, throw away those old skivvies and you're done.

      You have been warned,

      Jim P.
    • waljaco
      Most I suspect were replaced with glass lined or plastic tanks due to corrosion of the copper - the quality of water is bad in many parts of Australia. wal ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 28, 2004
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        Most I suspect were replaced with glass lined or plastic tanks due to
        corrosion of the copper - the quality of water is bad in many parts
        of Australia.
        wal
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jimpuchai" <puchai4@o...> wrote:
        > In Australia, the post war building boom was marked by a luxury
        that
        > was not common before the war. Hot water on tap was an essential
        > item in those many, many new houses. The system was rather
        primitive
        > by todays standards but worked well enough for the times.
        > The standard installation was a 300 to 400 litre tank with an
        > immersion heater at the bottom, the large tank being filled by a
        > header tank with a float valve to shut of the water thus preventing
        > overflow. The greatest number of these post war homes were single
        > story. With the tank on the rafters just above the inhabited rooms,
        > the head of hot water was not great but sufficed for the times.
        Many
        > of the tanks were uninsulated and stood on a shallow drip tray with
        > a pipe to carry leaked water outside, rather than have it drip
        > through the plaster board to the rooms below. The insulated tanks
        > were mainly placed inside a steel tank with 4" of asbestos wool on
        > all sides, top and bottom.
        >
        > So, what has all this to do with Australian treasure. As times got
        > better, and standards higher, one by one these older systems were
        > replaced by ground level systems, working at mains pressure and
        > usually gas fired. And all the old systems? They are still there!
        >
        > Thousands and thousands of large, heavy grade, copper tanks, unused
        > for decades and just waiting to be scrapped or rescued. The reason
        > they are still there, is that they are too big to pass between
        > ceiling rafters or out through the roof structural supports. This
        > explains why they never turn up whole at scrap metal merchants.
        >
        > The upshot of all this is to suggest that, if you see one of your
        > older local houses under extensive renovation, this may well be an
        > opportunity to upgrade to a man size cooking pot, or a fermenter
        > that will never bubble over. I should give the asbestos insulated
        > ones a miss, but the others are gold indeed. Mostly a $50 dollar
        > bill will suffice, and you may have to wait until they get to that
        > part of the renovation. Using these treasures is up to your
        > imagination, but they will cut neatly into two large boilers with
        > domed tops for the effort of providing and brazing on new flat
        > bottoms.
        >
        > Happy hunting,
        >
        > Jim P.
      • jimpuchai
        ... to ... parts ... Hello Wal, You are correct that there is copper corrosion in Australia. It seems to occur in a few percent of properties over a wide area.
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 28, 2004
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          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
          > Most I suspect were replaced with glass lined or plastic tanks due
          to
          > corrosion of the copper - the quality of water is bad in many
          parts
          > of Australia.
          > wal

          Hello Wal,

          You are correct that there is copper corrosion in Australia. It
          seems to occur in a few percent of properties over a wide area. This
          is also a problem in Europe and North America.
          It appears as though all the reasons for the corrosion are not fully
          understood, and various scientific bodies are still doing some
          fairly intensive research.

          Based on the percentage of properties that experience copper
          corrosion, the chance of getting a dud tank at random is in roughly
          the same order.
          If the acquisition is confined to uninsulated tanks, a heavily
          corroded tank will be fairly obvious, and the odds will swing in
          your favour.
          Removal of the 2" BSP blanking plug will let you see inside with a
          pen torch. This should make it a near certainty that your are buying
          a tank you can use.

          Regards,

          Jim P.

          http://www.masterplumbers.com/plumbwatch/pipes99/copper_corrosion.doc
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