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Re: Sticky Problem.

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  • Harry
    ... Hi Jim, See msg# 19210. Further to that, when I was in bakeries we just kept the malt in the coolroom (big walk-in fridge). In a bakery there is
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 27, 2004
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jimpuchai" <puchai4@o...> wrote:
      >
      > I am doing a little forward planning to emulate "Harry's formulae"
      >
      > One of the things that popped up, is the need to preserve, perhaps
      > for months, a quantity of liquid malt in its half used container.
      <snip>



      Hi Jim,
      See msg# 19210.

      Further to that, when I was in bakeries we just kept the malt in the
      coolroom (big walk-in fridge). In a bakery there is always plenty
      of yeast in the air, and gluten, which can also start a ferment
      (that's how molasses auto-starts). However, in the coolroom the
      malt would keep in good condition for several months (at least 6).

      HTH
      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • Hector A. Landaeta C.
      ... Hola Bill! Malt extract doesn¹t ³spoil² (read ferment) easily. It¹s gravity is much too high for any microorganism to make use of the plethora of
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 29, 2004
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        On 2/26/04 10:43 PM, "Bill Healey" <billhealey@...> wrote:
        >
        > Does anyone have some experience of the best way to deal with this
        > sticky* problem.

        Hola Bill!
        Malt extract doesn¹t ³spoil² (read ferment) easily. It¹s gravity is much
        too high for any microorganism to make use of the plethora of nutrients it
        has once diluted in water. The insistence of the advice of tightening the
        seal of the container is because of it¹s higroscopic proprieties (it tends
        to absorb humidity from any source but the most available one is air). Wild
        or domesticated yeast most surely is already there, dormant in suspension
        within the extract, what it doesn¹t have is enough water to activate it¹s
        metabolic functions.
        Most of the times when malt extract spoilage occurs, it is limited to the
        surface where moisture from the condensation of the container¹s headspace
        air (specially when the container is placed in a widely varying temp or
        usually warm room) is deposited. And it¹s very easy to cope with, just
        throw away the top 2 or 3 centimeters of the extract and that¹s it. I was
        once given a tip by a malt extract manufacturer that¹s very easy and
        effective: cut a piece of shrink wrap and carefully place on top of the
        exposed malt extract making sure that the edges are well covered. This
        limits the amount of extract surface contact with the headspace air to a
        minimum.
        Of course, I believe the course of action you favor in your last message
        (fermenting and stripping right away) would be the most fruitful, specially
        if you store the results in some oak casks!
        Salud!
        --
        Hector Landaeta.
        Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jimpuchai
        ... with this ... It¹s gravity is much ... nutrients it ... Hello Hector, Nice to see your posts again. The original question on malt came from me. There is
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 29, 2004
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          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Hector A. Landaeta C."
          <coloniera@c...> wrote:
          > On 2/26/04 10:43 PM, "Bill Healey" <billhealey@s...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Does anyone have some experience of the best way to deal
          with this
          > > sticky* problem.
          >
          > Hola Bill!
          > Malt extract doesn¹t ³spoil² (read ferment) easily.
          It¹s gravity
          is much
          > too high for any microorganism to make use of the plethora of
          nutrients it
          > has once diluted in water.

          Hello Hector,
          Nice to see your posts again. The original question on malt came
          from me.

          There is always a post or two on any subject where information is
          sought, in which the answer offered has the solid ring of hard
          earned knowledge based on experience. Your post was of that type.
          Some would call it an "Eureka" moment. Fully confident that the
          whole mass is not going to turn into a green heaving mass like "The
          Blob" of cinematic fame, I can now move on to the more interesting
          parts of this project.

          My thanks to the number of list members who have also helped, and
          to Harry for the leaks of his hard earned secrets.

          Todays mission . . . . The horse feed barley!

          Jim P.
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