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Re: [Distillers] Question about spent wash

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  • Ted Palmer
    The other half of the sugar is turned into carbon dioxide and heat. There is nothing left but yeast cells and water. _____________ Ted Palmer tpalmer@oz.net
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 4, 2001
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      The other half of the sugar is turned into carbon dioxide and heat. There is nothing left but yeast cells and water.
      _____________
      Ted Palmer
      tpalmer@...
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2001 5:15 AM
      Subject: [Distillers] Question about spent wash

      Afternoon everyone,

           Maybe I am completely missing what happens but.......
      If only about half the sugar is converted to ethanol during the
      fermentation process then what happens to the other half of the
      original sugar?  This leads me to another question - what if I
      distilled a 20L batch then used what is left in the boiler when done
      and add about 2.5 kg of sugar (half the regular amount) and pitched a
      normal ammount of yeast to it?  Would that work at all?  Better? 
      Worse? Could the liquid work if I just add 5 kg sugar?

      Thanks,

      Brett



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    • Tony & Elle Ackland
      Phil, The other half goes to making carbon dioxide (CO2) gas - thats the stuff bubbling out through the airlock. So all the sugar has gone at the end of the
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 4, 2001
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        Phil,

        The other half goes to making carbon dioxide (CO2) gas - thats the stuff
        bubbling out through the airlock.
        So all the sugar has gone at the end of the day.

        Sometimes commercial distilleries will reuse their spent wash, so that they
        don't have to use so much water next time, and also less to dispose of.
        This has to be done very carefully however to ensure that bacteria don't
        start breeding, and also to stop some of the yeast-inhibiting products
        present (like lactic acid) don't build up to levels that are a problem. I
        reckon its not worth the hassle for a hobby distiller, unless specifically
        trying to make like a sour-mash.

        Tony
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