Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Distillers] Digest Number 1691

Expand Messages
  • Steve
    watts = Voltage * amp is Ohms law, this is correct as for the 220/110 volt thing I suggest a DPDT switch label one side start up or High, the other run
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      watts = Voltage * amp is Ohms law, this is correct

      as for the 220/110 volt thing I suggest a DPDT switch label one side "start
      up" or High, the other "run" or Low or Simmer the wiring wont be too hard
      I can send you a diagram. remember to properly ground the metal of the
      still also, or you risk getting a zap.

      IBEW 305 sparky

      Steve


      ----- Original Message ----- From: "Brain Solenoid"
      <brain_solenoid@...>
      Subject: Re: Yet More Questions + Bigtime Thankyou to Alex

      > Pardon my electrical ignorance here, but:
      > If you use a 3000W element (240V) plugged into 120V supply do you
      need any special requirements in the plug or cord. How many amps is
      it?
      >
      > I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy
      > Ben


      Ben,
      Watts = Volts x Amps, and since the Wattage is quartered when you
      apply 110V to a 220/240V element, then:

      (3000W / 4) / 120V = 6.25A

      I'm not sparky, but that's the way it looks to me. The great Mike
      Nixon explained why the Wattage is quartered, but I have that E-mail
      on my home computer and not here.

      BS
    • Sven Pfitt
      (P)Watts = (I)Current times (E)voltage is the Power equation. Ohms Law is (E)Voltage = (I)Current times (R)Resistance A couple of things to look for. When I
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        (P)Watts = (I)Current times (E)voltage is the Power equation.
        Ohms Law is (E)Voltage = (I)Current times (R)Resistance

        A couple of things to look for. When I was working on my Brewery, I
        tried using a RIMS system at one time. It used a heating element in a
        chamber which the wort was pumped (recirculated) through.

        One thing I found was that different heating elements were rated at
        different voltages. For Instance I saw 220V, 235V, and 240V. There
        may be others as well.

        To determine the resistance of the element, use ohms law.

        for the 3000w element, I'll use the example of 220VAC.

        E = I * R

        P = I * E

        If we rewrite Ohms law to solve for I we have I = E / R,

        And substituting this in the power equation we have

        P = (E / R) * R = E * E / R or P = E Square over R

        Solving for R we have:

        R = E * E / P = 220 * 220 / 3000 = 16.333 Ohms

        Using this element at 110VAC one would see:

        P = 110 * 110 / 16.333 = 750W

        Now the tricky thing is that if the element had actually been rated
        at 240V instead of 220V(fine print), the results would have been:

        R= 240 * 240 / 3000 = 19.2 Ohms
        P = 110 * 110 / 19.2 = 630W !

        This is 120Watts less than expected.

        In addition, I have seen a 15% variation in line voltage at my house
        over the course of a month. So, be sure to measure your line voltage
        occasionally. If you are running a marginal heating element this
        could make things a bit sticky.

        It is a good idea to read the fine print on the heating element
        before you buy one to determine the actual rating of it at your
        voltage.

        Sven



        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <kyoto@c...> wrote:
        > watts = Voltage * amp is Ohms law, this is correct
        >
        > as for the 220/110 volt thing I suggest a DPDT switch label one
        side "start
        > up" or High, the other "run" or Low or Simmer the wiring wont be
        too hard
        > I can send you a diagram. remember to properly ground the metal of
        the
        > still also, or you risk getting a zap.
        >
        > IBEW 305 sparky
        >
        > Steve
        >
        ...snip...
      • Murphy-Marsh, Leigh
        $10 dollars (american?) for less than a litre of Nectar which is to be fermented out sounds very expensive. You must truly love Authentic tequila.
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          $10 dollars (american?) for less than a litre of Nectar which is to be fermented out sounds very expensive.
          You must truly love Authentic tequila.


          Recommendations and lessons learned:
          #1. The 5 gallon bucket is a better deal than ordering 6 quarts of
          agave nectar. $200 per 20 quarts versus $100 for 6 quarts when
          ordering jugs. Next time, I will go with a full bucket.

          #2. Much of the flavor of tequila is in the heads. Be stingy with
          how much of the heads you throw away.

          #3. Don't try to stretch the run on the back side. Better to cut
          tails too early than too late.

          #4. 8 kg of agave nectar won't give you the same yield as 8 kg of
          sugar.

          #5. If you try the agave nectar route, it WILL make good tequila! :)

          best regards,
          Tar
          sipping on a shot glass full of "El Mulo Blanco Mojo Tarquila" as he
          types this message :-)
        • Matt SF
          ... it is definitely not cheap and agave prices continue their boom and bust fluctuations much like coffee has for hundreds of years. However we pay such a
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            On Thu, Feb 05, 2004 at 06:42:03AM +0800, Murphy-Marsh, Leigh wrote:
            > $10 dollars (american?) for less than a litre of Nectar which is to be fermented out sounds very expensive.
            > You must truly love Authentic tequila.

            it is definitely not cheap and agave prices continue their boom and bust
            fluctuations much like coffee has for hundreds of years. However we pay
            such a large tax on distilled spirits in the US (approx 58% of retail
            price goes to taxes) that even as a niche hobby, it's still worth it :)

            Plus, while it lacks the romanticism and of course the full flavor of a
            true 100% agave tequila, you could cut the sugar a bit using honey, or
            even refined sugar. Make a tradeoff, e.g.: 70/30 agave/sugar.

            -Matt sf

            --
            -------------------------------------------------------------------------
          • Tarvus
            ... be fermented out sounds very expensive. ... Yes and yes! The demand for tequila and problems with agave crops and meeting demand has driven tequila prices
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Murphy-Marsh, Leigh"
              <Leigh.Murphy-Marsh@w...> wrote:
              > $10 dollars (american?) for less than a litre of Nectar which is to
              be fermented out sounds very expensive.
              > You must truly love Authentic tequila.

              Yes and yes!

              The demand for tequila and problems with agave crops and meeting
              demand has driven tequila prices sky high. So yes, you can expect to
              pay up for the fixin's if you want to experiment with making
              authentic tequila.

              Since a quart of agave nectar yields roughly a quart of tequila, it
              is still a bargain at $10 a quart. Heck, it was a bargain at $20 a
              quart!
            • John Nicol
              Hello Sven, Wednesday, February 4, 2004, 8:36:36 AM, you wrote: One thing I would like to add to this is that the resistance of most heating (nichrome) wire
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 7, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello Sven,

                Wednesday, February 4, 2004, 8:36:36 AM, you wrote:

                One thing I would like to add to this is that the resistance of most
                heating (nichrome) wire changes with temperature. So the resistance
                that you measure at room temperature is most likely 5% lower than
                what it will be at the elements operating temperature. The only real
                way to know what true wattage you are getting is to measure the
                current and voltage at the elements operating temperature.

                V X I = W.


                SP> (P)Watts = (I)Current times (E)voltage is the Power equation.
                SP> Ohms Law is (E)Voltage = (I)Current times (R)Resistance

                SP> A couple of things to look for. When I was working on my Brewery, I
                SP> tried using a RIMS system at one time. It used a heating element in a
                SP> chamber which the wort was pumped (recirculated) through.

                SP> One thing I found was that different heating elements were rated at
                SP> different voltages. For Instance I saw 220V, 235V, and 240V. There
                SP> may be others as well.

                SP> To determine the resistance of the element, use ohms law.

                SP> for the 3000w element, I'll use the example of 220VAC.

                SP> E = I * R

                SP> P = I * E

                SP> If we rewrite Ohms law to solve for I we have I = E / R,

                SP> And substituting this in the power equation we have

                SP> P = (E / R) * R = E * E / R or P = E Square over R

                SP> Solving for R we have:

                SP> R = E * E / P = 220 * 220 / 3000 = 16.333 Ohms

                SP> Using this element at 110VAC one would see:

                SP> P = 110 * 110 / 16.333 = 750W

                SP> Now the tricky thing is that if the element had actually been rated
                SP> at 240V instead of 220V(fine print), the results would have been:

                SP> R= 240 * 240 / 3000 = 19.2 Ohms
                SP> P = 110 * 110 / 19.2 = 630W !

                SP> This is 120Watts less than expected.

                SP> In addition, I have seen a 15% variation in line voltage at my house
                SP> over the course of a month. So, be sure to measure your line voltage
                SP> occasionally. If you are running a marginal heating element this
                SP> could make things a bit sticky.

                SP> It is a good idea to read the fine print on the heating element
                SP> before you buy one to determine the actual rating of it at your
                SP> voltage.

                SP> Sven



                SP> --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <kyoto@c...> wrote:
                >> watts = Voltage * amp is Ohms law, this is correct
                >>
                >> as for the 220/110 volt thing I suggest a DPDT switch label one
                SP> side "start
                >> up" or High, the other "run" or Low or Simmer the wiring wont be
                SP> too hard
                >> I can send you a diagram. remember to properly ground the metal of
                SP> the
                >> still also, or you risk getting a zap.
                >>
                >> IBEW 305 sparky
                >>
                >> Steve
                >>
                SP> ...snip...


                --
                Best regards,
                John mailto:nicol@...
              • Sven Pfitt
                True, however the heating elements are rated under load. That is why I calculated the effective resistance from the boiler-plate voltage and power rating of
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 7, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  True, however the heating elements are rated under load. That is why
                  I calculated the effective resistance from the boiler-plate voltage
                  and power rating of the element.

                  I suspect this is also why the resistance is not on the boiler-plate.


                  Sven
                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, John Nicol <nicol@h...> wrote:
                  > Hello Sven,
                  >
                  > Wednesday, February 4, 2004, 8:36:36 AM, you wrote:
                  >
                  > One thing I would like to add to this is that the resistance of most
                  > heating (nichrome) wire changes with temperature. So the resistance
                  > that you measure at room temperature is most likely 5% lower than
                  > what it will be at the elements operating temperature. The only
                  real
                  > way to know what true wattage you are getting is to measure the
                  > current and voltage at the elements operating temperature.
                  >
                  > V X I = W.
                  >
                  >
                  ...snip...
                  >
                  > --
                  > Best regards,
                  > John mailto:nicol@h...
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.