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yeast

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  • nvo@net-tech.com.au
    Just about to add my yeast to my barley/whiskey mash and wondered.Does anyone know what sort of yeast to use?.I can only get turbo yeast and wondered if I
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 28 11:12 PM
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      Just about to add my yeast to my barley/whiskey mash and
      wondered.Does anyone know what sort of yeast to use?.I can only get
      turbo yeast and wondered if I could use it.I am under the impression
      that I dont need the turbo yeast as the mash has enough nutrients for
      the yeast to work.I am making the whiskey as exact as I can after
      seeing a video on how to make poteen just the other week ago.They use
      brewers yeast but every where I go they only have turbo yeast.
      Please can anyone help?

      regards andrew
    • Ted Palmer
      Yes, you can use the turbo yeast but the flavor profile will not resemble your typical whisky. Is there a brewery near you? Ask them for a few liters of yeast
      Message 2 of 26 , Mar 1, 2001
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        Yes, you can use the turbo yeast but the flavor profile will not resemble your typical whisky. Is there a brewery near you? Ask them for a few liters of yeast slurry and use 1 cup per 20-25 liters of wort.
        _____________
        Ted Palmer
        tpalmer@...
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: nvo@...
        Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2001 11:12 PM
        Subject: [Distillers] yeast

        Just about to add my yeast to my barley/whiskey mash and
        wondered.Does anyone know what sort of yeast to use?.I can only get
        turbo yeast and wondered if I could use it.I am under the impression
        that I dont need the turbo yeast as the mash has enough nutrients for
        the yeast to work.I am making the whiskey as exact as I can after
        seeing a video on how to make poteen just the other week ago.They use
        brewers yeast but every where I go they only have turbo yeast.
        Please can anyone help?

        regards andrew



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      • Matt
        ... Yes Turbo is really designed for ethanol-over-flavor production. Donald of Outterson LLC (who I wish would post here more often as he is a font of brewing
        Message 3 of 26 , Mar 1, 2001
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          On Thu, Mar 01, 2001 at 07:12:01AM -0000, nvo@... wrote:
          > Just about to add my yeast to my barley/whiskey mash and
          > wondered.Does anyone know what sort of yeast to use?.I can only get
          > turbo yeast and wondered if I could use it.I am under the impression
          > that I dont need the turbo yeast as the mash has enough nutrients for
          > the yeast to work.I am making the whiskey as exact as I can after
          > seeing a video on how to make poteen just the other week ago.They use
          > brewers yeast but every where I go they only have turbo yeast.
          > Please can anyone help?

          Yes Turbo is really designed for ethanol-over-flavor production. Donald
          of Outterson LLC (who I wish would post here more often as he is a font
          of brewing and distilling knowledge) has recommended Red Star Dry Active
          Distiller's Yeast which I've found through a few mailorder places. He
          also has said that at least one top tequila manufacturer uses Alltech's
          Superstart yeast.

          good luck and let us know how your production goes!

          --
          ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Matthew @ psibercom
          psibercom.org: doing pretty much nothing for the net since 1994!
        • Gary Gluyas
          Hello Andrew . . . and others I have been away from the office for a few days and due to lack of time have been unable to reply till now. We stock two
          Message 4 of 26 , Mar 2, 2001
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            Hello Andrew . . . and others

            I have been away from the office for a few days and due to lack of time
            have been unable to reply till now.

            We stock two different types of a high alcohol spirit yeast and they both
            perform exceptionally well - only $2.00 per pack (for 20 - 25L wash)

            Even though it is a slower ferment, I have been using them myself
            experimentally of recent. I am also finding that both yeasts will perform
            as good, and yield as much as the turbo's currently available, which I have
            been using exclusively until now.

            Cheers
            MILL-FORD LODGE HOMEBREW SHOP
            ASHBURTON
            NEW ZEALAND


            Gary Gluyas
            gluyas@...

            www.pbsltd.co.nz

            ----------
            From: nvo@...
            To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Distillers] yeast
            Date: Thursday, 1 March 2001 20:12

            Just about to add my yeast to my barley/whiskey mash and
            wondered.Does anyone know what sort of yeast to use?.I can only get
            turbo yeast and wondered if I could use it.I am under the impression
            that I dont need the turbo yeast as the mash has enough nutrients for
            the yeast to work.I am making the whiskey as exact as I can after
            seeing a video on how to make poteen just the other week ago.They use
            brewers yeast but every where I go they only have turbo yeast.
            Please can anyone help?

            regards andrew




            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Cary Humber
            I m fairly new to the game and I was wondering if anyone has ever used Fleischman s Rapid Rise Yeast. I usually use the regular Fleischman s. Are there any
            Message 5 of 26 , Jan 3, 2002
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              I'm fairly new to the game and I was wondering if anyone has ever used Fleischman's Rapid Rise Yeast.  I usually use the regular Fleischman's.  Are there any differences that are good for alcohol fermentation? 
                  Thanks,
                      Cary Humber
            • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
              Cary, ... Fleischman s Rapid Rise Yeast. I usually use the regular Fleischman s. Are there any differences that are good for alcohol fermentation? The Mead
              Message 6 of 26 , Jan 3, 2002
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                Cary,

                >I'm fairly new to the game and I was wondering if anyone has ever used
                Fleischman's Rapid Rise Yeast. I usually use the regular Fleischman's. Are
                there any differences that are good for alcohol fermentation?

                The Mead guys seem a little divided on the subject ...some say that you'll
                get limited alcohol, whereas others say it will keep on making alcohol for
                you. Some love the taste of Fleischmans, others dont.

                See the following in "The Mead Lovers Digest" #737 (April 99)
                http://hubris.engin.umich.edu:8080/Beer/Threads/Mead/1999/0737

                cheers,

                Tony

                ***********************************

                William .."As to taste in the final product the best yeasts I found to be
                the
                granulated dry ones (Fleischmann's for instance). The worst were the wet
                yeast bricks or tablets - these gave a decidedly 'bready' taste that did not
                disappear even with extended aging (2 or 3 years)."

                Mark ..."Remember, however that bread yeast strains
                may have been selected for CO2 production (especially the newer
                quick-rise strains), not alcohol production or flavor profiles.
                Bread yeast, therefore, may be more appropriate for low alcohol
                meads. "

                then ..

                Subject: Re: Bread Yeast (my two farthings)
                From: Faulconess`at`aol.com
                Date: Thu, 22 Apr 1999 22:15:21 EDT

                <snip>
                > I was toying with the idea of making a 1gal batch
                > of traditional mead using bread yeast.

                One of the main differences between brewer's and baker's yeast, is that the
                varied strains used for brewing WILL generally stabilize, and stop
                fermenting once the alcohol reaches a certain level. The yeast will die off

                or go dormant, while there's still some suger left to make the mead taste
                sweet.

                Baker's yeast however, has no such scruples. It will just keep going and
                going like the Energizer Bunny....and your must will get harder, and harder,

                and harder. If you choose to age it...shoot, in a year, you could have
                turpentine.

                I live in the Appalachians, where homemade dandelion, "ramp", and other
                country concoctions, are common. Ever had homemade Cider, or Apple Jack?
                ;) Baker's yeast is freely used around here. For "mountain wine", the
                resulting extra dryness, astringency and alcoholic "kick" isn't a problem.

                On

                It all depends on what you want out of your mead. I too, used Fleischman's

                Rapid Rise for my first batch (many years ago!) and it came out HORRIBLE
                (IMHO) It was then I wised up and started using brewer's yeast, which I've
                used ever since.

                But that is MY taste buds talking; I like a medium to sweet mead, and I
                most
                certainly DON'T like dry melomel!!!! However, friends who tried the same
                batch (and who prefer their potables dry) sang its praises and begged me to

                make more. Different strokes, as they say. :/
              • hollyjayde
                what is the difference, if any,between yeast used for bread making and that used for brewing up booze?
                Message 7 of 26 , May 24, 2004
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                  what is the difference, if any,between yeast used for bread making
                  and that used for brewing up booze?
                • Darryl Humby
                  Hi, Ordinary bread yeast will work for booze making but it won t survive very long once your alc level reaches @ 8%, while yeasts used specifically for brewing
                  Message 8 of 26 , May 25, 2004
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                    Hi,
                    Ordinary bread yeast will work for booze making but it won't survive very long once your alc level reaches @ 8%, while yeasts used specifically for brewing your own booze will reach 10 to 18 % alc. or higher depending on what you use. Most people go for the higher yielding yeasts as you will get more "product" per litre of wash with the alc. yeasts as compared to bread yeast.

                    Hope this helps....
                    Darryl

                    hollyjayde <hollyjayde@...> wrote:
                    what is the difference, if any,between yeast used for bread making
                    and that used for brewing up booze?



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                  • Sven Pfitt
                    In addition, bread yeast will produce more undesirable compounds (flavors) than yeast specifically selected for fermentation. Sven ... survive very long once
                    Message 9 of 26 , May 25, 2004
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                      In addition, bread yeast will produce more undesirable compounds
                      (flavors) than yeast specifically selected for fermentation.

                      Sven

                      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Darryl Humby <bum_man2003@y...>
                      wrote:
                      > Hi,
                      > Ordinary bread yeast will work for booze making but it won't
                      survive very long once your alc level reaches @ 8%, while yeasts used
                      specifically for brewing your own booze will reach 10 to 18 % alc. or
                      higher depending on what you use. Most people go for the higher
                      yielding yeasts as you will get more "product" per litre of wash with
                      the alc. yeasts as compared to bread yeast.
                      >
                      > Hope this helps....
                      > Darryl
                      >
                      > hollyjayde <hollyjayde@y...> wrote:
                      > what is the difference, if any,between yeast used for bread making
                      > and that used for brewing up booze?
                      >
                      ...snip...
                    • David W Lunsford
                      Well, my local supply house was out of Alcotech 48, but I picked up some Liquor Quick super yeast, and it boasts 20% abv in 5 days. Has anyone tried this
                      Message 10 of 26 , Oct 23, 2004
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                        Well, my local supply house was out of Alcotech 48, but I picked up some
                        "Liquor Quick" super yeast, and it boasts 20% abv in 5 days. Has anyone
                        tried this product? It also says on the packet that this yeast doesn't
                        clear normally, and that I need to buy their clearing product. I suspect
                        this is a way for them to sell more products, but I feel that a quick trip
                        to the deep freeze should clear it without freezing it. Anyone have any
                        input? I dont mind trying new things, as thats what got me started in the
                        first place. Thanks, Dave
                      • art
                        Good morning Dave, Liquor Quick is the only Turbo I can find here in the S.F. bay aera...works just fine, alot like the 24 & 48 turbo s from what I have read,
                        Message 11 of 26 , Oct 24, 2004
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                          Good morning Dave,

                          Liquor Quick is the only Turbo I can find here in the S.F. bay
                          aera...works just fine, alot like the 24 & 48 turbo's from what I
                          have read, clears just fine after a week.

                          Art.


                          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, David W Lunsford
                          <maxtonnage@e...> wrote:
                          > Well, my local supply house was out of Alcotech 48, but I picked
                          up some
                          > "Liquor Quick" super yeast, and it boasts 20% abv in 5 days. Has
                          anyone
                          > tried this product? It also says on the packet that this yeast
                          doesn't
                          > clear normally, and that I need to buy their clearing product. I
                          suspect
                          > this is a way for them to sell more products, but I feel that a
                          quick trip
                          > to the deep freeze should clear it without freezing it. Anyone
                          have any
                          > input? I dont mind trying new things, as thats what got me
                          started in the
                          > first place. Thanks, Dave
                        • David W Lunsford
                          OK, Thanks Art....I m gonna give it the ole try...Dave
                          Message 12 of 26 , Oct 24, 2004
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                            OK, Thanks Art....I'm gonna give it the ole try...Dave


                            At 05:20 PM 10/24/04 -0000, you wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >Good morning Dave,
                            >
                            >Liquor Quick is the only Turbo I can find here in the S.F. bay
                            >aera...works just fine, alot like the 24 & 48 turbo's from what I
                            >have read, clears just fine after a week.
                            >
                            >Art.
                            >
                            >
                            >--- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, David W Lunsford
                            ><maxtonnage@e...> wrote:
                            >> Well, my local supply house was out of Alcotech 48, but I picked
                            >up some
                            >> "Liquor Quick" super yeast, and it boasts 20% abv in 5 days. Has
                            >anyone
                            >> tried this product? It also says on the packet that this yeast
                            >doesn't
                            >> clear normally, and that I need to buy their clearing product. I
                            >suspect
                            >> this is a way for them to sell more products, but I feel that a
                            >quick trip
                            >> to the deep freeze should clear it without freezing it. Anyone
                            >have any
                            >> input? I dont mind trying new things, as thats what got me
                            >started in the
                            >> first place. Thanks, Dave
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
                            > FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org
                            >Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • loulenz2002
                            Hey guys, i lve in chile, S. america, and i mainly do sour mash corn whiskey, whenever i go to the states i buy dry ale yeast, but i ran out and i used dry
                            Message 13 of 26 , Jul 23, 2005
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                              Hey guys, i lve in chile, S. america, and i mainly do sour mash corn
                              whiskey, whenever i go to the states i buy dry ale yeast, but i ran
                              out and i used dry baker´s yeast and it turned out pretty good. But
                              the other day i found some other yeast that i´ve never seen before it
                              looks like modeling clay and same texture as clay, you to keep it
                              refrigerated and it doesn´t stay for very long. Has anyone ever heard
                              of this, and if so would it be adequate for my distilling uses?
                              Thanks. Lou
                            • Alex _{*L*}_ (a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
                              The type of yeast you are talking about is a live culture without processing (freeze-dry dehydrating). It is most likely the same product as bakers yeast.
                              Message 14 of 26 , Jul 23, 2005
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                                The type of yeast you are talking about is a live culture without processing (freeze-dry dehydrating). It is most likely the same product as bakers yeast. Quantity-wise it is much bulkier than freeze-dried and vacuum packed yeast. I think a packet 3cm x 2cm x 2cm is very close to one packet of dry active yeast. Most likely it will work exactly or even better than the yeast from a packet.

                                loulenz2002 <loulenz2002@...> wrote: Hey guys, i lve in chile, S. america, and i mainly do sour mash corn whiskey, whenever i go to the states i buy dry ale yeast, but i ran out and i used dry baker´s yeast and it turned out pretty good. But the other day i found some other yeast that i´ve never seen before it looks like modeling clay and same texture as clay, you to keep it refrigerated and it doesn´t stay for very long. Has anyone ever heard of this, and if so would it be adequate for my distilling uses?
                                Thanks. Lou




                                Alex_{*L*}_(a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
                                http://briefcase.yahoo.com/bokakob

























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                              • Louis Lenz
                                Thanks for info on the yeast, I`ll give it a try. Lou Alex _{*L*}_ (a.k.a. BOKAKOB) wrote:The type of yeast you are talking about is a
                                Message 15 of 26 , Jul 26, 2005
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                                  Thanks for info on the yeast, I`ll give it a try. Lou

                                  "Alex _{*L*}_ (a.k.a. BOKAKOB)" <bokakob@...> wrote:The type of yeast you are talking about is a live culture without processing (freeze-dry dehydrating). It is most likely the same product as bakers yeast. Quantity-wise it is much bulkier than freeze-dried and vacuum packed yeast. I think a packet 3cm x 2cm x 2cm is very close to one packet of dry active yeast. Most likely it will work exactly or even better than the yeast from a packet.

                                  loulenz2002 <loulenz2002@...> wrote: Hey guys, i lve in chile, S. america, and i mainly do sour mash corn whiskey, whenever i go to the states i buy dry ale yeast, but i ran out and i used dry baker´s yeast and it turned out pretty good. But the other day i found some other yeast that i´ve never seen before it looks like modeling clay and same texture as clay, you to keep it refrigerated and it doesn´t stay for very long. Has anyone ever heard of this, and if so would it be adequate for my distilling uses?
                                  Thanks. Lou




                                  Alex_{*L*}_(a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
                                  http://briefcase.yahoo.com/bokakob

























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                                  Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
                                  FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



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                                • bobcrowder2001
                                  Corn cob whiskey anybody? Lowering ethanol production costs: A new strain of yeast that could help streamline cellulosic ethanol costs and production has been
                                  Message 16 of 26 , May 5, 2013
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                                    Corn cob whiskey anybody?

                                     

                                    Lowering ethanol production costs:

                                    A new strain of yeast that could help streamline cellulosic ethanol costs and production has been developed by USDA researchers.  (5/2) http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2013/130502.htm

                                     

                                    Bob Crowder

                                    4 A Good Auction

                                    3921 Mansfield Highway

                                    Fort Worth, Texas 76119

                                    817-536-3921

                                     

                                  • edbar44
                                    actually, it s been around for quite some time, maybe it s finally perfected. I believe I read about this several years ago and it can actually ferment
                                    Message 17 of 26 , May 6, 2013
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                                      actually, it's been around for quite some time, maybe it's finally perfected. I believe I read about this several years ago and it can actually ferment newspaper.

                                      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, <bob@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Corn cob whiskey anybody?
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Lowering ethanol production costs:
                                      >
                                      > A new strain of yeast that could help streamline cellulosic ethanol costs
                                      > and production has been developed by USDA researchers. (5/2)
                                      > http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2013/130502.htm
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Bob Crowder
                                      >
                                      > 4 A Good Auction
                                      >
                                      > 3921 Mansfield Highway
                                      >
                                      > Fort Worth, Texas 76119
                                      >
                                      > 817-536-3921
                                      >
                                    • bobcrowder2001
                                      I sure would like to get some of that strain of yeast - I have a large pile of cardboard that has been processed through a Geil grinder (hammer mill). I was
                                      Message 18 of 26 , May 7, 2013
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                                        I sure would like to get some of that strain of yeast – I have a large pile of cardboard that has been processed through a Geil grinder (hammer mill). I was going to make some papercrete with it but 190proof cardboard sounds better. LOL

                                         

                                        Bob c

                                         

                                      • henry sangret
                                        You might want to find out what kind of alcohol it makes.  Dont they make denatured alcohol from wood pulp? ________________________________ From:
                                        Message 19 of 26 , May 7, 2013
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                                          You might want to find out what kind of alcohol it makes.  Dont they make denatured alcohol from wood pulp?

                                          From: "bob@..." <bob@...>
                                          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 3:21 PM
                                          Subject: [Distillers] Re: yeast
                                           
                                          I sure would like to get some of that strain of yeast – I have a large pile of cardboard that has been processed through a Geil grinder (hammer mill). I was going to make some papercrete with it but 190proof cardboard sounds better. LOL
                                           
                                          Bob c
                                           
                                        • danmonnier
                                          I started off using turbo yeast a year ago. fair results using a 5 gal pot. I then switched to BSG 9804a distillers yeast. results some good some baaaad.
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Aug 9, 2014
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                                            I started off using turbo yeast a year ago. fair results using a 5 gal pot. I then switched to BSG 9804a distillers yeast. results some good some baaaad. Anyone have any input? Directions say only .25 tsp per gal of liquid

                                          • RLB
                                            I find the best results comes from growing a large yeast colony before pitching.  I have never had a yeast failure doing it this way, but I have had failures
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Aug 9, 2014
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                                              I find the best results comes from growing a large yeast colony before pitching.  I have never had a yeast failure doing it this way, but I have had failures just pouring yeast directly into 5 gal.  You did not mention DAP, lemon juice, or container (yeast needs oxygenated water, food, and low bacteria competition.)

                                              Next time, this might be a better subject for New Distillers.

                                              Robert


                                              From: "monnierd11@... [Distillers]" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                              To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Saturday, August 9, 2014 4:27 PM
                                              Subject: [Distillers] yeast

                                               
                                              I started off using turbo yeast a year ago. fair results using a 5 gal pot. I then switched to BSG 9804a distillers yeast. results some good some baaaad. Anyone have any input? Directions say only .25 tsp per gal of liquid


                                            • Fredrick Lee
                                              You have to count viable cells in order to know your pitch rate. There s no other way around it. You can guess by starting with new yeast, but about 50% of
                                              Message 22 of 26 , May 19, 2015
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                                                You have to count viable cells in order to know your pitch rate.   There's no other way around it. You can guess by starting with new yeast, but about 50% of the dry yeast dies once opened after a few days and a pinhole in packaging can do the same.  It's more obvious to us on a professional scale because a 20kg bale of yeast with a hole in the package will be soft and a sealed one is rock solid.  The small 11g packages are just always soft to me.  Get a small microscope ($50?) and a cheapo haemocytometer ($40) and some methylene blue ($10) and a click-counter and you're all set.  

                                                The flipside is that you could buy a lot of 11g packets with that money though and it's fairly uncommon that distillers overpitch yeast to the point of making an awful product. A cheap stir plate and some boiled wort will prop an 11g package a 100g in about 30 hours. Don't over do the dap, and don't fuck with your pH unless you have a pH meter and know why you're changing ph. All grain gyle will have plenty of nutrients and enzymes for yeast activity.  The cake from a previous batch will have enough cells to do 4 batches (at least) but you have to rack the stock off the cake soon after you hit FG, yeast will die off at an alarming rate under high alcohol beer without food .  This is obviously the best case for homebrewers as it saves you money for about 11-16 generations if you're sterile enough.  

                                                .25 teaspoons/gal of yeast with unknown health is meaningless. A freshly opened package sounds right,  but make a starter and count cells to be positive. Otherwise it's voodoo and no one can really help you. 







                                                On Aug 9, 2014, at 16:27, monnierd11@... [Distillers] <Distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                 

                                                I started off using turbo yeast a year ago. fair results using a 5 gal pot. I then switched to BSG 9804a distillers yeast. results some good some baaaad. Anyone have any input? Directions say only .25 tsp per gal of liquid

                                              • RLB
                                                Here in the US they didn t start using packaged yeast until 1874.  With that said, many moonshines prefer natural yeast.  Some of my malt customers have
                                                Message 23 of 26 , May 19, 2015
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                                                  Here in the US they didn't start using packaged yeast until 1874.  With that said, many moonshines prefer natural yeast.  Some of my malt customers have stated that their mash started to ferment before they pitched their yeast.  If you make your own gain malts and allow them to rest from 2 to 6 weeks before using live natural yeast will grow on your grain malts.  I for one have decided to go natural and allow my malts to pitch yeast rather than take a chance on packaged yeast.  Yes, packaged yeast does have benefits over natural, but I think I will eventually make a better produce when I open a distillery.

                                                  Robert


                                                  From: "Fredrick Lee fredrick@... [Distillers]" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                                  To: "Distillers@yahoogroups.com" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                                  Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 1:08 PM
                                                  Subject: Re: [Distillers] yeast

                                                   
                                                  You have to count viable cells in order to know your pitch rate.   There's no other way around it. You can guess by starting with new yeast, but about 50% of the dry yeast dies once opened after a few days and a pinhole in packaging can do the same.  It's more obvious to us on a professional scale because a 20kg bale of yeast with a hole in the package will be soft and a sealed one is rock solid.  The small 11g packages are just always soft to me.  Get a small microscope ($50?) and a cheapo haemocytometer ($40) and some methylene blue ($10) and a click-counter and you're all set.  

                                                  The flipside is that you could buy a lot of 11g packets with that money though and it's fairly uncommon that distillers overpitch yeast to the point of making an awful product. A cheap stir plate and some boiled wort will prop an 11g package a 100g in about 30 hours. Don't over do the dap, and don't fuck with your pH unless you have a pH meter and know why you're changing ph. All grain gyle will have plenty of nutrients and enzymes for yeast activity.  The cake from a previous batch will have enough cells to do 4 batches (at least) but you have to rack the stock off the cake soon after you hit FG, yeast will die off at an alarming rate under high alcohol beer without food .  This is obviously the best case for homebrewers as it saves you money for about 11-16 generations if you're sterile enough.  

                                                  .25 teaspoons/gal of yeast with unknown health is meaningless. A freshly opened package sounds right,  but make a starter and count cells to be positive. Otherwise it's voodoo and no one can really help you. 







                                                  On Aug 9, 2014, at 16:27, monnierd11@... [Distillers] <Distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                   
                                                  I started off using turbo yeast a year ago. fair results using a 5 gal pot. I then switched to BSG 9804a distillers yeast. results some good some baaaad. Anyone have any input? Directions say only .25 tsp per gal of liquid


                                                • Fredrick Lee
                                                  If your mash starts fermenting before you pitch, you ve made a sanitation mistake somewhere in your process. And while I agree that amateur moonshiners often
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , May 19, 2015
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                                                    If your mash starts fermenting before you pitch, you've made a sanitation mistake somewhere in your process. And while I agree that amateur moonshiners often prefer wild yeast, they should read a book about what strains come from grains and what strains come from queen bees and compare that to expected attenuation rates, pH and flavor profiles, but like you said, this is all a conversation better suited for New Distillers.  







                                                    On May 19, 2015, at 13:32, RLB last2blast@... [Distillers] <Distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                     

                                                    Here in the US they didn't start using packaged yeast until 1874.  With that said, many moonshines prefer natural yeast.  Some of my malt customers have stated that their mash started to ferment before they pitched their yeast.  If you make your own gain malts and allow them to rest from 2 to 6 weeks before using live natural yeast will grow on your grain malts.  I for one have decided to go natural and allow my malts to pitch yeast rather than take a chance on packaged yeast.  Yes, packaged yeast does have benefits over natural, but I think I will eventually make a better produce when I open a distillery.

                                                    Robert


                                                    From: "Fredrick Lee fredrick@... [Distillers]" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                                    To: "Distillers@yahoogroups.com" <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                                    Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2015 1:08 PM
                                                    Subject: Re: [Distillers] yeast

                                                     
                                                    You have to count viable cells in order to know your pitch rate.   There's no other way around it. You can guess by starting with new yeast, but about 50% of the dry yeast dies once opened after a few days and a pinhole in packaging can do the same.  It's more obvious to us on a professional scale because a 20kg bale of yeast with a hole in the package will be soft and a sealed one is rock solid.  The small 11g packages are just always soft to me.  Get a small microscope ($50?) and a cheapo haemocytometer ($40) and some methylene blue ($10) and a click-counter and you're all set.  

                                                    The flipside is that you could buy a lot of 11g packets with that money though and it's fairly uncommon that distillers overpitch yeast to the point of making an awful product. A cheap stir plate and some boiled wort will prop an 11g package a 100g in about 30 hours. Don't over do the dap, and don't fuck with your pH unless you have a pH meter and know why you're changing ph. All grain gyle will have plenty of nutrients and enzymes for yeast activity.  The cake from a previous batch will have enough cells to do 4 batches (at least) but you have to rack the stock off the cake soon after you hit FG, yeast will die off at an alarming rate under high alcohol beer without food .  This is obviously the best case for homebrewers as it saves you money for about 11-16 generations if you're sterile enough.  

                                                    .25 teaspoons/gal of yeast with unknown health is meaningless. A freshly opened package sounds right,  but make a starter and count cells to be positive. Otherwise it's voodoo and no one can really help you. 







                                                    On Aug 9, 2014, at 16:27, monnierd11@... [Distillers] <Distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                     
                                                    I started off using turbo yeast a year ago. fair results using a 5 gal pot. I then switched to BSG 9804a distillers yeast. results some good some baaaad. Anyone have any input? Directions say only .25 tsp per gal of liquid


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