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Re: Digest Number 10

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  • Robert Jung
    ... The subject of Jack Daniels and their carbon treatment is actually an interesting story. In regards to using polishing carbon, Jack Daniels is very proud
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 17, 1999
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      > Date: Fri, 17 Sep 1999 09:47:09 +1200
      > From: "Mike" <mike@...>
      >Subject: Coffey still - activated carbon
      >
      >Hello Ray,
      >In respect to my comments about the use of carbon, you have put your finger
      >on the exact point I was trying to make. Whether using the carbon to remove
      >the bulk of the fusels, or later to �polish� the resulting liquor by
      >removing the
      >higher alcohols that slipped through the first treatment and which give that
      >nasty �bite�, it is an acknowledgement that the still has not been 100%
      >efficient
      >in stripping these alcohols out.
      >What I didn�t say � and I cheerfully admit that I should � I have to use
      >carbon
      >myself and am constantly trying new designs that will hopefully relieve me
      >of
      >this chore. It seems you�ve gone a long way towards this with your
      >magnificent
      >Moonshine Still. Intriguing design!
      >I find it fascinating that Jack Daniels use carbon as a means of speeding up
      >the
      >process of getting their product to the market. Sounds like a smart move.
      >All the best,
      >Mike
      >
      >mike@...

      The subject of Jack Daniels and their carbon treatment is actually an
      interesting story.
      In regards to using polishing carbon, Jack Daniels is very proud of their
      product; in no way are they 'apologizing' by listing the process on the
      bottle. Quite the opposite! I visited their (one and only) distillery in
      Lynchburg, Tennessee this summer and believe me, their charcoal process is
      the key to Jack Daniels. JD is sold as a "Tennessee Whiskey", not a
      bourbon, kentucky, etc - and the distinction is that of the carbon process.
      They lobbied the US govt to give them that special distinction, in part
      because no other (in the US anyway) major whiskey manufacturer uses the
      carbon process.
      Their new product is "gentleman jack" which is double filtered and possibly
      aged longer. believe me, it's smooooth!


      Allow me to introduce myself:
      My name is Robert Jung, I'm a history major at the University of Texas,
      here in Austin, TX. I've been homebrewing for about a 2 years, and have
      only recently become interested in still design. OF COURSE, since i'm
      stateside, it's only theoretical work. regardless, I've enjoyed the
      discussion thus far.
      feel free to look at my web page, under heavy, heavy construction at
      http://ccwf.cc.utexas.edu/~robjung
      no still stuff up yet, but soon...! Thanks, guys!
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