Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Ph

Expand Messages
  • yldog@hotmail.com
    Hello everybody I have just started acidifying my wort and I am having a few problems that I would love some help with I am acidifying with HCl to an Ph of 5
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 16, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello everybody
      I have just started acidifying my wort and I am having a few problems
      that I would love some help with
      I am acidifying with HCl to an Ph of 5 but after a day or 2 this goes
      back to 7. Has anybody had any experience with this sort of thing if
      so how did you rectify the problem.
      Thanks for any help anyone can offer
      From Scott
    • Ted Palmer
      There isn t enough info here to make a guess. what are you fermenting in? what is the ingredient list for the wort? have you mixed the wort when you take a
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 16, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        There isn't enough info here to make a guess. what are you fermenting in? what is the ingredient list for the wort? have you mixed the wort when you take a sample? what is your spoon made of? is the yeast fermenting well? what kind of yeast? tell us more about the acid, pH method etc.
        What you describe just doesn't happen in the real world.
        _____________
        Ted Palmer
        tpalmer@...
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: yldog@...
        Sent: Friday, February 16, 2001 2:06 AM
        Subject: [Distillers] Ph

        Hello everybody
        I have just started acidifying my wort and I am having a few problems
        that I would love some help with
        I am acidifying with HCl to an Ph of 5 but after a day or 2 this goes
        back to 7. Has anybody had any experience with this sort of thing if
        so how did you rectify the problem.
        Thanks for any help anyone can offer
        >From Scott



      • yldog@hotmail.com
        Ted I m fermenting in a plastic soft drink bottle so I don t think it is that. The ingredients are brown sugar water a wine yeast and nutrient. The water is
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 16, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Ted
          I'm fermenting in a plastic soft drink bottle so I don't think it is
          that. The ingredients are brown sugar water a wine yeast and
          nutrient. The water is filtered so probably not anything in that, the
          nutrient is di ammonium phosphate. The wort is mixed without a spoon
          just shaking the bottle. The acid is just HCl at 300 g/l that is all
          I know about it. The way I measure it is a analogue Ph meter which is
          made of metal.

          I guess it is just the ph meter I use if no one else has this sort of
          problem
          Thanks
          From Scott
        • Ted Palmer
          I would say the problem is the pH meter. Do you have buffers to calibrate it? Are they fresh? The probe that you are using doesn t sound like an organics
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 16, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            I would say the problem is the pH meter. Do you have buffers to calibrate it? Are they fresh? The probe that you are using doesn't sound like an organics type(these aren't made of metal). I use litmus papers just because of how flaky pH meters are.
            _____________
            Ted Palmer
            tpalmer@...
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: yldog@...
            Sent: Friday, February 16, 2001 5:55 PM
            Subject: [Distillers] Ph

            Ted
            I'm fermenting in a plastic soft drink bottle so I don't think it is
            that. The ingredients are brown sugar water a wine yeast and
            nutrient. The water is filtered so probably not anything in that, the
            nutrient is di ammonium phosphate. The wort is mixed without a spoon
            just shaking the bottle. The acid is just HCl at 300 g/l that is all
            I know about it. The way I measure it is a analogue Ph meter which is
            made of metal.

            I guess it is just the ph meter I use if no one else has this sort of
            problem
            Thanks
            >From Scott



          • Derek Hamlet
            ... Gotama Buddha would suggest that it is all an illusion. Low ph refers to a point below whatever point a particular writer is referencing. For example if
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 16, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              At 07:55 AM 12/16/2013, you wrote:
              >
              >
              >Just to get the convention right, when we say low Ph, does that mean
              >less than 7 going towards 0, or greater than 7 going towards 14. I
              >always thought it was cool how 7 is Gods number and its half the Ph
              >scale... I wonder if hygrogen is Gods favorite element.

              Gotama Buddha would suggest that it is all an illusion.
              Low ph refers to a point below whatever point a particular writer is
              referencing. For example if theoretically the ideal ph of a wine or
              fermented must or whatever happened to be 6.3, then anything below
              that would be low ph.
              For example there is an ideal ph for a red wine must. Grapes from
              California's central valley are often very high in sugar but low in
              acids. Hence one adds acid to hopefully achieve the magic number at
              the end of fermentation. The problem for home winemakers is that
              they consult their tables and additions charts and add the amount
              that the math tells them is the correct addition.
              Red wine is mysterious. It's flipping hard to get accurate acid
              measurements because some of the acids are hidden. The trick is to
              add half of what your measurements say. This usually ends up with a
              fermented product that is really close to the ideal. It's way easier
              to add more acid than it is to remove it. End of acid rant.


              Derek



              ---
              This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
              http://www.avast.com
            • White Bear
              To answer your question, not belittiling Budda or any other diety, pH is considered nutral at 7.  Anything under 7 is considered acidic and anything over 7 is
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 16, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                To answer your question, not belittiling Budda or any other diety, pH is considered nutral at 7.  Anything under 7 is considered acidic and anything over 7 is alkaline.  pH is logmarithmic and is discribed as any number other than 7 is 10 times that number so if your liquid is 6 - that is 10 times as acidic as nutral.  if it is 5, it is 100 times as acidic and so on.
                 
                 

                From: Derek Hamlet <derekhamlet@...>
                To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, December 16, 2013 11:53 AM
                Subject: Re: [Distillers] Ph

                 
                At 07:55 AM 12/16/2013, you wrote:
                >
                >
                >Just to get the convention right, when we say low Ph, does that mean
                >less than 7 going towards 0, or greater than 7 going towards 14. I
                >always thought it was cool how 7 is Gods number and its half the Ph
                >scale... I wonder if hygrogen is Gods favorite element.

                Gotama Buddha would suggest that it is all an illusion.
                Low ph refers to a point below whatever point a particular writer is
                referencing. For example if theoretically the ideal ph of a wine or
                fermented must or whatever happened to be 6.3, then anything below
                that would be low ph.
                For example there is an ideal ph for a red wine must. Grapes from
                California's central valley are often very high in sugar but low in
                acids. Hence one adds acid to hopefully achieve the magic number at
                the end of fermentation. The problem for home winemakers is that
                they consult their tables and additions charts and add the amount
                that the math tells them is the correct addition.
                Red wine is mysterious. It's flipping hard to get accurate acid
                measurements because some of the acids are hidden. The trick is to
                add half of what your measurements say. This usually ends up with a
                fermented product that is really close to the ideal. It's way easier
                to add more acid than it is to remove it. End of acid rant.

                Derek

                ---
                This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
                http://www.avast.com



              • matt hammond
                Thanks -ben
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 16, 2013
                • 0 Attachment

                  Thanks

                  -ben



                  From: White Bear <sha_man_1@...>;
                  To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com <Distillers@yahoogroups.com>;
                  Subject: Re: [Distillers] Ph
                  Sent: Mon, Dec 16, 2013 7:34:58 PM

                   

                  To answer your question, not belittiling Budda or any other diety, pH is considered nutral at 7.  Anything under 7 is considered acidic and anything over 7 is alkaline.  pH is logmarithmic and is discribed as any number other than 7 is 10 times that number so if your liquid is 6 - that is 10 times as acidic as nutral.  if it is 5, it is 100 times as acidic and so on.
                   
                   

                  From: Derek Hamlet <derekhamlet@...>
                  To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, December 16, 2013 11:53 AM
                  Subject: Re: [Distillers] Ph

                   
                  At 07:55 AM 12/16/2013, you wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >Just to get the convention right, when we say low Ph, does that mean
                  >less than 7 going towards 0, or greater than 7 going towards 14. I
                  >always thought it was cool how 7 is Gods number and its half the Ph
                  >scale... I wonder if hygrogen is Gods favorite element.

                  Gotama Buddha would suggest that it is all an illusion.
                  Low ph refers to a point below whatever point a particular writer is
                  referencing. For example if theoretically the ideal ph of a wine or
                  fermented must or whatever happened to be 6.3, then anything below
                  that would be low ph.
                  For example there is an ideal ph for a red wine must. Grapes from
                  California's central valley are often very high in sugar but low in
                  acids. Hence one adds acid to hopefully achieve the magic number at
                  the end of fermentation. The problem for home winemakers is that
                  they consult their tables and additions charts and add the amount
                  that the math tells them is the correct addition.
                  Red wine is mysterious. It's flipping hard to get accurate acid
                  measurements because some of the acids are hidden. The trick is to
                  add half of what your measurements say. This usually ends up with a
                  fermented product that is really close to the ideal. It's way easier
                  to add more acid than it is to remove it. End of acid rant.

                  Derek

                  ---
                  This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
                  http://www.avast.com



                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.