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Falvouring

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  • Maxime Belair
    Hello! I m still not ready to make my first batch, but I m getting things prepared. I have a little question about liqueurs. When you take neutral alcohol to
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 4, 2004
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      Hello!

      I'm still not ready to make my first batch,
      but I'm getting things prepared. I have a little
      question about liqueurs.

      When you take neutral alcohol to make an orange
      liqueur, a shcnapps or a gin or whatever in that style
      should you have precise quantity of orange
      peel/quantity alcohol. Or you would recommend to take
      a lot of peels and let's say 500ml of alcohol and then
      distill. And finally dilute this concentrated extract
      to taste with alcohol and water.

      I think it will end up with the same final product
      whatever wich of the 2 ways you choose.

      But simply, if you make a gin you can make a
      concentrate but of course be sure that all the
      ingredients are in right proportions.

      I though this would be a great way to avoid buying a
      balance to calcul precise weights of spices in grams
      as the recipe are rarely in tsp. and tbsp.

      I know it is probably not the real way of doing it,
      probably that grand marnier and beefeater do not make
      a concentrate extract and then dilute .

      Any thoughs or experiences, what would you suggest?
      After all, a balance that precise weight in grams may
      not be so expensive.

      Cheers!

      Maxime Belair,

      Quebec, Canada.

      __________________________________________________________
      Lèche-vitrine ou lèche-écran ?
      magasinage.yahoo.ca
    • Andrew Forsberg
      ... Actually, quite a few gin makers do just this. Beefeater imported to NZ, for example, is just grain neutral with the appropriate amount of concentrate
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 4, 2004
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        > I know it is probably not the real way of doing it,
        > probably that grand marnier and beefeater do not make
        > a concentrate extract and then dilute .

        Actually, quite a few gin makers do just this. Beefeater imported to NZ,
        for example, is just grain neutral with the appropriate amount of
        concentrate added to it, post customs.

        Almost all of the gins here have 'distilled under license', or some
        such, on the back. I'd be fairly certain they are all produced in this
        way. On the other hand, the premium 'imported' gins, like Tanqueray and
        Bombay, are made the old fashioned way.

        It's a lot easier and cheaper to use essences. You may, or may not, be
        able to tell the difference...

        Personally I'd probably go for the balances -- you'll need them if
        you're going to accurately measure out the quantities for your essences
        in the first place.

        Good luck,
        Andrew
      • waljaco
        As the quantity of essential oils can vary considerably it is a good suggestion to make your own essential oil tincture and use that to flavor your base spirit
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 4, 2004
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          As the quantity of essential oils can vary considerably it is a good
          suggestion to make your own essential oil tincture and use that to
          flavor your base spirit to taste. Quite possibly commercial
          distillers use tinctures to adjust strengths.
          Wal
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Maxime Belair <maxime_belair@y...>
          wrote:
          > Hello!
          >
          > I'm still not ready to make my first batch,
          > but I'm getting things prepared. I have a little
          > question about liqueurs.
          >
          > When you take neutral alcohol to make an orange
          > liqueur, a shcnapps or a gin or whatever in that style
          > should you have precise quantity of orange
          > peel/quantity alcohol. Or you would recommend to take
          > a lot of peels and let's say 500ml of alcohol and then
          > distill. And finally dilute this concentrated extract
          > to taste with alcohol and water.
          >
          > I think it will end up with the same final product
          > whatever wich of the 2 ways you choose.
          >
          > But simply, if you make a gin you can make a
          > concentrate but of course be sure that all the
          > ingredients are in right proportions.
          >
          > I though this would be a great way to avoid buying a
          > balance to calcul precise weights of spices in grams
          > as the recipe are rarely in tsp. and tbsp.
          >
          > I know it is probably not the real way of doing it,
          > probably that grand marnier and beefeater do not make
          > a concentrate extract and then dilute .
          >
          > Any thoughs or experiences, what would you suggest?
          > After all, a balance that precise weight in grams may
          > not be so expensive.
          >
          > Cheers!
          >
          > Maxime Belair,
          >
          > Quebec, Canada.
          >
          > __________________________________________________________
          > Lèche-vitrine ou lèche-écran ?
          > magasinage.yahoo.ca
        • Hector A. Landaeta C.
          ... Hola Maxime! To be precise, ALL of them use the extract system. Gin is not a good example because traditionally it¹s flavors are extracted ³hot²,
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 5, 2004
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            On 1/4/04 10:06 PM, "Maxime Belair" <maxime_belair@...> wrote:
            >
            > Any thoughs or experiences, what would you suggest?
            > After all, a balance that precise weight in grams may
            > not be so expensive.

            Hola Maxime!
            To be precise, ALL of them use the extract system. Gin is not a good
            example because traditionally it¹s flavors are extracted ³hot², during
            distillation, and high priced brands all claim they go the hard way to
            obtain those different flavors, but all of the other liquor makers do the
            extract thing, it¹s the only way to maintain consistency in flavors/colors.
            There is always a subjective part to this system and that is that to have a
            standard in flavor/color concentration in a given extract is a bit dicey. I
            understand perfume makers have it hard doing this same thing and It think I
            read once that what they do is simply to rely on a single person who tastes
            the extracts to determine if it¹s strong enough to be the closest to the
            standard that can possibly be. Keeping a small vial of the extract you used
            for the first recipe of your liqueur is a good idea to check it with any new
            extract batch but you have to give it some leeway due to aging and possible
            small changes in it¹s organoleptic profile.
            What you need is not a precise balance Maxime, but a graduated glass and a
            good nose/palate. Once your reach a certain standard in your extract making
            it¹s volumes you¹ll be mixing. Because of the volumes I work with I use
            simple and cheap kilo balances with little resolution, just to give me an
            idea of the ideal fruit weight to ethanol volume. For this you could use a
            cheap kitchen scale. Precision¹s place is not there, but in the mixing of
            the different extracts to give your liquors complexity.
            Salud!
            --
            Hector Landaeta.
            Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Tom
            where do I get french oak chips
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 24, 2010
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              where do I get french oak chips
            • Harry
              ... From a french oak tree
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 24, 2010
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                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tommcswiggan@...> wrote:
                >
                > where do I get french oak chips
                >


                From a french oak tree
              • Dick Box
                If you live in North America contact me at TheFementationStore@gmail.com. We carry them. To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com From: tommcswiggan@yahoo.ca Date: Fri,
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 24, 2010
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                  If you live in North America contact me at TheFementationStore@.... We carry them.


                  To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  From: tommcswiggan@...
                  Date: Fri, 24 Dec 2010 20:52:29 +0000
                  Subject: [Distillers] Flavouring

                   
                  where do I get french oak chips


                • Alex Castillo
                  Hi Tom Sorry for a late answer. There´s an easier way to get the french oak chips, than a french oak tree in france or somewhere else, lol, which is to buy it
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 31, 2010
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                    Hi Tom

                    Sorry for a late answer. There´s an easier way to get the french oak chips, than a french oak tree in france or somewhere else, lol, which is to buy it from any store buying materials for home winemakers. I use to buy mine at:

                    http://tinyurl.com/2vrp3up

                    Good prices and good service so far.

                    Good luck!

                    Alex
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