Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Distillers] Mango?

Expand Messages
  • BOKAKOB
    THAT made me envious!.. I am going out to the fruit stand and immediately making a mango extract!!! I will take the 95% then drop there some mangoes and wait
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 30, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      THAT made me envious!.. I am going out to the fruit stand and immediately making a mango extract!!! I will take the 95% then drop there some mangoes and wait untill mangoes feels dry and hard. THEN I am going to cut the 95% to about 32% and do exactly as you did. Drink it during the meal. I feel so sorrow that I live in the city and the only fruits laying around are dog and cat droppings.... Just kidding - the messages are getting stale.

      Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:I haven't seen anything here about using Mango fruit to make
      alcohol. If anyone has done anything with this fruit would you care
      to share?

      I've got two huge mango trees in my backyard and they're bearing
      now. In North Queensland mangoes grow wild everywhere, and every
      year there's tons of fruit all over the ground going to waste.

      This year I decided to try making use of the fruit. Here's what
      I've done so far...

      Collected a wheelbarrow full of mangoes (abt. 1% of one tree).
      Peeled & sliced the fruit, skins and seeds and some flesh into the
      60 litre fermenter, the choisest flesh into small takeaway
      containers and into the freezer. Frozen mango and icecream is a
      delicious dessert. My kids love it!

      With the fermenter about 1/3 full of mango waste, I added 6 kg of
      raw sugar (the one containing traces of molasses). Then I added 10
      litres of HOT water, stirred it up vigorously to dissolve the sugar
      and aerate it. Then I added 15 litres of COLD water and again
      stirred it up. The wort temp was 27C and room temp the same.

      Next I pitched 200g of granulated bakers yeast rehydrated in 1 litre
      of warm water. I used such a large dose because I wanted it to take
      off quickly. If you know anything about the Tropics and mangoes,
      natural fermentation starts almost immediately the fruit drops on
      the ground, and I wanted to avoid this because of the unpredictable
      results from wild yeasts.

      On the second day I added another 3 kg raw sugar dissolved in 10
      litres of tap water, abt. 25C

      On the third day I repeated day 2.

      On day 7 I drained all the liquid off the mango pulp into another
      fermenter.

      On day 10 I double-distilled in a potstill, using the normal whisky
      cuts. I got 4 litres @ 87% and about 2 litres heads & tails.

      I sliced up 8 mangoes and put them in with the 4 litres @ 87% into
      two 4 litre glass jars. To each jar I added 250ml of sugar syrup
      (100g sugar, 200ml water, dissolve over low heat, add a squeeze of
      lemon to stop crystallising).

      After 5 days, the jars with the fruit and clear yellow liquid now
      are two very pretty table centerpieces. I put crushed ice in a
      glass, abt half full, and use a stainless gravy ladle to dip into
      the liquor and pour over the ice. Then I swirl the glass to melt
      and combine the ice and liquor. Sip it slowly, with a meal.

      One or two drinks with fish or chicken meal is very nice. But I
      wouldn't drink much more than that, it's POTENT!

      Slainte!
      regards Harry




      To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
      FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



      ---------------------------------
      Yahoo! Groups Links

      To visit your group on the web, go to:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.





      I can be wrong I must say
      Cheers, Alex...



      ---------------------------------
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tintin
      Hi, You also cam prepare some mango wine which is a very nice aperitiv. 3 kg of mango sugar water yeast 2 oranges (halved) 1 lemon (halved) cut the mangos in
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 31, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi,

        You also cam prepare some mango wine which is a very nice aperitiv.

        3 kg of mango
        sugar
        water
        yeast
        2 oranges (halved)
        1 lemon (halved)

        cut the mangos in small parts, put them in a pot with some water, cook then until you get a nice marmelade. Strain and put the liquid in the fermenter.
        add 5 liter of water and 1.5 kg sugar (check gd = 1.08)
        stir and add the yeast
        fermentation is slow and without huge bubbles
        after 10 days, siphon and enjoy it.

        tintin





        BOKAKOB <bokakob@...> wrote:
        THAT made me envious!.. I am going out to the fruit stand and immediately making a mango extract!!! I will take the 95% then drop there some mangoes and wait untill mangoes feels dry and hard. THEN I am going to cut the 95% to about 32% and do exactly as you did. Drink it during the meal. I feel so sorrow that I live in the city and the only fruits laying around are dog and cat droppings.... Just kidding - the messages are getting stale.

        Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:I haven't seen anything here about using Mango fruit to make
        alcohol. If anyone has done anything with this fruit would you care
        to share?

        I've got two huge mango trees in my backyard and they're bearing
        now. In North Queensland mangoes grow wild everywhere, and every
        year there's tons of fruit all over the ground going to waste.

        This year I decided to try making use of the fruit. Here's what
        I've done so far...

        Collected a wheelbarrow full of mangoes (abt. 1% of one tree).
        Peeled & sliced the fruit, skins and seeds and some flesh into the
        60 litre fermenter, the choisest flesh into small takeaway
        containers and into the freezer. Frozen mango and icecream is a
        delicious dessert. My kids love it!

        With the fermenter about 1/3 full of mango waste, I added 6 kg of
        raw sugar (the one containing traces of molasses). Then I added 10
        litres of HOT water, stirred it up vigorously to dissolve the sugar
        and aerate it. Then I added 15 litres of COLD water and again
        stirred it up. The wort temp was 27C and room temp the same.

        Next I pitched 200g of granulated bakers yeast rehydrated in 1 litre
        of warm water. I used such a large dose because I wanted it to take
        off quickly. If you know anything about the Tropics and mangoes,
        natural fermentation starts almost immediately the fruit drops on
        the ground, and I wanted to avoid this because of the unpredictable
        results from wild yeasts.

        On the second day I added another 3 kg raw sugar dissolved in 10
        litres of tap water, abt. 25C

        On the third day I repeated day 2.

        On day 7 I drained all the liquid off the mango pulp into another
        fermenter.

        On day 10 I double-distilled in a potstill, using the normal whisky
        cuts. I got 4 litres @ 87% and about 2 litres heads & tails.

        I sliced up 8 mangoes and put them in with the 4 litres @ 87% into
        two 4 litre glass jars. To each jar I added 250ml of sugar syrup
        (100g sugar, 200ml water, dissolve over low heat, add a squeeze of
        lemon to stop crystallising).

        After 5 days, the jars with the fruit and clear yellow liquid now
        are two very pretty table centerpieces. I put crushed ice in a
        glass, abt half full, and use a stainless gravy ladle to dip into
        the liquor and pour over the ice. Then I swirl the glass to melt
        and combine the ice and liquor. Sip it slowly, with a meal.

        One or two drinks with fish or chicken meal is very nice. But I
        wouldn't drink much more than that, it's POTENT!

        Slainte!
        regards Harry




        To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
        FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.





        I can be wrong I must say
        Cheers, Alex...



        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
        FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        tintin_milou92


        ---------------------------------
        Do You Yahoo!? -- Une adresse @... gratuite et en français !
        Testez le nouveau Yahoo! Mail

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Rana Pipiens
        Since the mango wash and wine (or liquer) has come up I ll ask a question that I didn t get a response from once again. Has anyone ever used white sapote to
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 31, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Since the mango wash and wine (or liquer) has come up I'll ask a question that I didn't get a response from once again. Has anyone ever used white sapote to make a wash, liquer, or wine. I'd be very interested because I have a friend with a large tree and I understand that type of fruit is produced in far greater numbers than the mere mortal can utilize. Thanks Rana.

          tintin <tintin_milou92@...> wrote:Hi,

          You also cam prepare some mango wine which is a very nice aperitiv.

          3 kg of mango
          sugar
          water
          yeast
          2 oranges (halved)
          1 lemon (halved)

          cut the mangos in small parts, put them in a pot with some water, cook then until you get a nice marmelade. Strain and put the liquid in the fermenter.
          add 5 liter of water and 1.5 kg sugar (check gd = 1.08)
          stir and add the yeast
          fermentation is slow and without huge bubbles
          after 10 days, siphon and enjoy it.

          tintin





          BOKAKOB <bokakob@...> wrote:
          THAT made me envious!.. I am going out to the fruit stand and immediately making a mango extract!!! I will take the 95% then drop there some mangoes and wait untill mangoes feels dry and hard. THEN I am going to cut the 95% to about 32% and do exactly as you did. Drink it during the meal. I feel so sorrow that I live in the city and the only fruits laying around are dog and cat droppings.... Just kidding - the messages are getting stale.

          Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:I haven't seen anything here about using Mango fruit to make
          alcohol. If anyone has done anything with this fruit would you care
          to share?

          I've got two huge mango trees in my backyard and they're bearing
          now. In North Queensland mangoes grow wild everywhere, and every
          year there's tons of fruit all over the ground going to waste.

          This year I decided to try making use of the fruit. Here's what
          I've done so far...

          Collected a wheelbarrow full of mangoes (abt. 1% of one tree).
          Peeled & sliced the fruit, skins and seeds and some flesh into the
          60 litre fermenter, the choisest flesh into small takeaway
          containers and into the freezer. Frozen mango and icecream is a
          delicious dessert. My kids love it!

          With the fermenter about 1/3 full of mango waste, I added 6 kg of
          raw sugar (the one containing traces of molasses). Then I added 10
          litres of HOT water, stirred it up vigorously to dissolve the sugar
          and aerate it. Then I added 15 litres of COLD water and again
          stirred it up. The wort temp was 27C and room temp the same.

          Next I pitched 200g of granulated bakers yeast rehydrated in 1 litre
          of warm water. I used such a large dose because I wanted it to take
          off quickly. If you know anything about the Tropics and mangoes,
          natural fermentation starts almost immediately the fruit drops on
          the ground, and I wanted to avoid this because of the unpredictable
          results from wild yeasts.

          On the second day I added another 3 kg raw sugar dissolved in 10
          litres of tap water, abt. 25C

          On the third day I repeated day 2.

          On day 7 I drained all the liquid off the mango pulp into another
          fermenter.

          On day 10 I double-distilled in a potstill, using the normal whisky
          cuts. I got 4 litres @ 87% and about 2 litres heads & tails.

          I sliced up 8 mangoes and put them in with the 4 litres @ 87% into
          two 4 litre glass jars. To each jar I added 250ml of sugar syrup
          (100g sugar, 200ml water, dissolve over low heat, add a squeeze of
          lemon to stop crystallising).

          After 5 days, the jars with the fruit and clear yellow liquid now
          are two very pretty table centerpieces. I put crushed ice in a
          glass, abt half full, and use a stainless gravy ladle to dip into
          the liquor and pour over the ice. Then I swirl the glass to melt
          and combine the ice and liquor. Sip it slowly, with a meal.

          One or two drinks with fish or chicken meal is very nice. But I
          wouldn't drink much more than that, it's POTENT!

          Slainte!
          regards Harry




          To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
          FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.





          I can be wrong I must say
          Cheers, Alex...



          ---------------------------------
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
          FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          tintin_milou92


          ---------------------------------
          Do You Yahoo!? -- Une adresse @... gratuite et en fran�ais !
          Testez le nouveau Yahoo! Mail

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
          FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




          ---------------------------------
          Do you Yahoo!?
          New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • was2132
          ... question that I didn t get a response from once again. Has anyone ever used white sapote to make a wash, liquer, or wine. (Just in case someone besides
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 31, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rana Pipiens <ranah2o@y...> wrote:
            > Since the mango wash and wine (or liquer) has come up I'll ask a
            question that I didn't get a response from once again. Has anyone
            ever used white sapote to make a wash, liquer, or wine.

            (Just in case someone besides myself has never heard of the sapote.)

            sapote , name for several Central American trees and their fruits.
            Sapotes, sweet and pulpy, are commonly seen in tropical markets and
            are usually eaten fresh, although some are also used in preserves,
            e.g., the green sapote (Ponteria viride or Calocarpum viride) and P.
            sapota or C. sapota, also called marmalade-plum. These and the
            yellow sapote (P. salicifolia or Lucuma salicifolia) are of the
            sapodilla family. The white sapote (Casimiroa edulis), of the rue
            family, has been introduced throughout the Caribbean area and is
            sometimes grown in S California. The various sapotes are classified
            in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida. Ponteria
            (including Calocarpum and Lucuma) is classified in the order
            Ebenales, family Sapotaceae, Casimiroa in the order Sapindales,
            family Rutaceae.
          • Harry
            ... question that I didn t get a response from once again. Has anyone ever used white sapote to make a wash, liquer, or wine. I d be very interested because
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 31, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rana Pipiens <ranah2o@y...> wrote:
              > Since the mango wash and wine (or liquer) has come up I'll ask a
              question that I didn't get a response from once again. Has anyone
              ever used white sapote to make a wash, liquer, or wine. I'd be very
              interested because I have a friend with a large tree and I
              understand that type of fruit is produced in far greater numbers
              than the mere mortal can utilize. Thanks Rana.



              Hi Rana,
              You can find out all you need to know about that fruit here...
              http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/white_sapote.html

              From what I read, I can't see any reason not to use it, just be
              careful of the seeds. They contain a narcotic that can be fatal to
              humans & animals if eaten raw.

              Casimiroa edulis, (white sapote) produces large greenish
              yellow fruits that look like apples. The flesh of the
              fruit has been compared to that of the cherimoya or a
              sweet avocado.
              The fruit can be eaten fresh, or turned into preserves
              and nectar or added to milkshakes, ice cream and
              yogurt. The fruit is picked when full-sized, but still
              hard and ripens off the tree in seven to 14 days. The
              tree grows well on poor and saline soil, and is both
              drought tolerant and frost tolerant.

              Food Value Per 100 g of Fresh Pulp*
              Moisture 78.3 g
              Protein 0.143 g
              Fat 0.03 g
              Fiber 0.9g
              Ash 0.48g
              Calcium 9.9 mg
              Phosphorus 20.4 mg
              Iron 0.33 mg
              Carotene 0.053 mg
              Thiamine 0.042 mg
              Riboflavin 0.043 mg
              Niacin 0.472 mg
              Ascorbic Acid 30.3 mg

              HTH

              Slainte!
              regards Harry
            • Rana Pipiens
              Harry, a very interesting site, especially the section on toxicity and use as a soporiphic and insecticide. Never knew that. Thanks. Rana . Hi Rana, You can
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 31, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                Harry, a very interesting site, especially the section on toxicity and use as a soporiphic and insecticide. Never knew that. Thanks. Rana

                .



                Hi Rana,
                You can find out all you need to know about that fruit here...
                http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/white_sapote.html

                From what I read, I can't see any reason not to use it, just be
                careful of the seeds. They contain a narcotic that can be fatal to
                humans & animals if eaten raw.

                Casimiroa edulis, (white sapote) produces large greenish
                yellow fruits that look like apples. The flesh of the
                fruit has been compared to that of the cherimoya or a
                sweet avocado.
                The fruit can be eaten fresh, or turned into preserves
                and nectar or added to milkshakes, ice cream and
                yogurt. The fruit is picked when full-sized, but still
                hard and ripens off the tree in seven to 14 days. The
                tree grows well on poor and saline soil, and is both
                drought tolerant and frost tolerant.

                Food Value Per 100 g of Fresh Pulp*
                Moisture 78.3 g
                Protein 0.143 g
                Fat 0.03 g
                Fiber 0.9g
                Ash 0.48g
                Calcium 9.9 mg
                Phosphorus 20.4 mg
                Iron 0.33 mg
                Carotene 0.053 mg
                Thiamine 0.042 mg
                Riboflavin 0.043 mg
                Niacin 0.472 mg
                Ascorbic Acid 30.3 mg

                HTH

                Slainte!
                regards Harry






                To unsubscribe from this group send a blank email to distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
                FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org



                ---------------------------------
                Yahoo! Groups Links

                To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/

                To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                Distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




                ---------------------------------
                Do you Yahoo!?
                New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Hector A. Landaeta C.
                ... Hola Harry! I got at it once or twice some time ago a bit differently. I don¹t like most of the results of fermented fruit because most of the time
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 2, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 12/30/03 9:34 PM, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

                  > I haven't seen anything here about using Mango fruit to make
                  > alcohol. If anyone has done anything with this fruit would you care
                  > to share?

                  Hola Harry!
                  I got at it once or twice some time ago a bit differently. I don¹t like
                  most of the results of fermented fruit because most of the time fermentation
                  changes too much a fruit¹s flavor. Master eau de vie makers, the Alsatians,
                  do ferment their fruit but upon distilling they add all of it, skins, seeds
                  and stones into their fermenters (that¹s why they make those European stills
                  with humongous drain outlets ­the smallest I¹ve seen is 4 inches-) thus
                  obtaining a mix of the alcoholic content plus some essential fruit oils.
                  What I did is take some 96% industrial bought molasses ethanol and covered a
                  container full of mango pulp made just from the flesh (I don¹t like the
                  Creoline taste of the skin), and after 5 days I placed all of this, flesh
                  included, in the still and did a rough and quick distillation á la stripping
                  run. The results where in the mid 80% and when diluted to 40% gave an
                  incredibly strong smelling and tasting mango eau de vie, both more related
                  to the fresh fruit than what resulted from a mango wine experiment I did
                  before.
                  Salud!
                  --
                  Héctor Landaeta.
                  Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Campbell Ritchie
                  ... covered a ... like the ... this, flesh ... stripping ... gave an ... related ... I did ... That sounds a very interesting thing to try with the current
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 3, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Hector A. Landaeta C."
                    <coloniera@c...> wrote:
                    > What I did is take some 96% industrial bought molasses ethanol and
                    covered a
                    > container full of mango pulp made just from the flesh (I don¹t
                    like the
                    > Creoline taste of the skin), and after 5 days I placed all of
                    this, flesh
                    > included, in the still and did a rough and quick distillation á la
                    stripping
                    > run. The results where in the mid 80% and when diluted to 40%
                    gave an
                    > incredibly strong smelling and tasting mango eau de vie, both more
                    related
                    > to the fresh fruit than what resulted from a mango wine experiment
                    I did
                    > before.
                    > Salud!
                    > --
                    > Héctor Landaeta.
                    > Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.

                    That sounds a very interesting thing to try with the current glut of
                    mangoes here in the Godzone. Any empirical measurements of pulp to
                    ethanol or was it a case of slopping some of each into a bucket?

                    Gardyloo!
                    Campbell
                  • Michael
                    ... I ve made a mango liquer by steeping mango flesh in 50% spirit. I then watered to 30% and added sugar to taste. I ve also used cream instead of water to
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 4, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment
                      > On 12/30/03 9:34 PM, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > I haven't seen anything here about using Mango fruit to make
                      > > alcohol. If anyone has done anything with this fruit would you
                      > > care to share?

                      I've made a mango liquer by steeping mango flesh in 50% spirit. I
                      then watered to 30% and added sugar to taste. I've also used cream
                      instead of water to make something similar to Amarula. Quite nice.
                      Just don't add the skin or seed.

                      Michael
                    • Hector A. Landaeta C.
                      ... Hola Campbell! Generally I make some small batch tests to try the fruit variety¹s maximum flavor extraction point. To me, here, 96% molasses ethanol is
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 5, 2004
                      • 0 Attachment
                        On 1/4/04 2:00 AM, "Campbell Ritchie" <ritchiec@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > That sounds a very interesting thing to try with the current glut of
                        > mangoes here in the Godzone. Any empirical measurements of pulp to
                        > ethanol or was it a case of slopping some of each into a bucket?

                        Hola Campbell!
                        Generally I make some small batch tests to try the fruit variety¹s maximum
                        flavor extraction point. To me, here, 96% molasses ethanol is way cheaper
                        than any bought fruit (I¹m paying Au$ 0,96 per liter of the stuff right now)
                        so what I have to try is when the fruit weight to ethanol volume hit¹s the
                        point when fruit taste diminishes appreciably to a given volume. Different
                        fruits, even different varieties within a same fruit give different weight
                        to volume ratios of extraction. That is, of course, if you¹re minding too
                        much the bottom line (as I have too, this is a hobby-business for me), if
                        not, just use Walter¹s rule of thumb: fill the container of fruit with some
                        headspace and cover it with spirit leaving like an inch above the cover to
                        allow for expansion (some may occur, perhaps some contraction, even). Times
                        of effective extraction for fruits when using high purity spirits are
                        normally measured in hours but leaving it in an opaque, airtight container
                        for at least a week increases consubstantiation (don¹t know if the term is
                        correct in English. My software¹s dictionary terms it as a theological term
                        but in Spanish it¹s mainly chemical). Try to make an extract of the skin
                        alone (some varieties have a more pronounced ŒCreoline¹ flavor, some even
                        give a nice floral one), and also of the big seeds. The two or three
                        varieties I¹ve tried with here don¹t give any big flavor or aroma so being
                        that it¹s a big PITA, and messy to boot, to peel a ripe mango of it¹s big
                        seed I gather you can go ahead and make the extraction with seeds and all.
                        Personally I don¹t like the taste or smell of mango skins but you must try
                        it for yourself first. A variation I¹ve found extremely interesting because
                        of it¹s tartness and wholly different taste (doesn¹t taste like mango at
                        all) is the Œdone¹ but green mango sweet liquor. It¹s not easy to convey
                        what I mean by ³done and green². In the Caribbean we call this point in a
                        fruit¹s maturation ³Jecho², a given fruit is ³Jecha² when, still being green
                        or unripe, it reaches it¹s full size and almost all it¹s weight, what
                        remains is only for it to get sweeter and turn from green to yellow/red (in
                        the case of mangoes). In the Caribbean basin we make all kinds of sweets,
                        jellies and desserts with green mangoes. What I do, essentially, is a green
                        mango jelly liquor (licor de jalea de mango, Walter). You have to cook
                        (just boiling till soft inside and skin cracks open), then peel and take out
                        the seed by scratching out the pulp through a kitchen sieve, then add some
                        lemon, perhaps a bit of citric acid (that¹s up to taste) and the sufficient
                        sugar syrup (remember to always invert this also with a little acid) and
                        some vodka to your consistency¹s taste. To make the jelly (kids will love
                        it for sure), just add some granulated sugar to the pulp (I think it¹s
                        something in the ballpark of 1/2 a cup of sugar per big mango, I¹m not sure.
                        Sweet making is Œholy¹ woman territory around here), some lemon and let
                        stiffen in the fridge. Hope this helped.
                        Salud!
                        --
                        Hector Landaeta.
                        Colonia Tovar - Venezuela.



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.