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fermentation of sugars other than dextrose

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  • waljaco@hotmail.com
    I would like to know if the fructose obtained from the splitting of sucrose (in the mash) ferments into etanol with the also obtained glucose? Also ethanol is
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2001
      I would like to know if the fructose obtained from the splitting of
      sucrose (in the mash) ferments into etanol with the also obtained
      glucose?

      Also ethanol is now obtained commercialy from sweet milk whey which
      is high in the sugar lactose. Do they use lactase to split the
      lactose into glucose and galactose then use a saccharomyces yeast, or
      do they use the lactose fermenting yeast kluyveromyces marxianus?
      Does the galactose ferment into ethanol?

      Regards,
      Wal
    • Tony & Elle Ackland
      ... Wal, I ve just collected my interloan copy of The Alcohol Textbook from my local library, and its got a bit about this in it... I ll summarise the main
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 2, 2001
        >Also ethanol is now obtained commercialy from sweet milk whey which
        >is high in the sugar lactose. Do they use lactase to split the
        >lactose into glucose and galactose then use a saccharomyces yeast, or
        >do they use the lactose fermenting yeast kluyveromyces marxianus?
        >Does the galactose ferment into ethanol?

        Wal,

        I've just collected my "interloan" copy of "The Alcohol Textbook" from my
        local library, and its got a bit about this in it... I'll summarise the
        main points ...

        * Whey generally contains 4.8% lactose, 0.6% protein, 0.6% salts and 0.05%
        fats

        * Lactose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and galactose

        * Normal distillers yeast (Saccharomyces cervisiae) will ferment galactose
        only very slowly, and only if no glucose is present. Not considered
        economically feasible (can be done, but need huge excesses of yeast & long
        time)

        * one particular species will work, Kluyveromyces marxianus, variety
        marxianus (previously known as K.fragilis). Its not available commercially
        in dried form.

        * you can only expect to obtain about 2.5% by volume of alcohol

        *much of the technology is proprietry.



        re your other question : fructose is very fermentable.

        Tony
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