Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Using lime to adjust pH

Expand Messages
  • Harry
    ... hydrated lime ... term lime is ... which kind ... still valid. ... confused ... therefore ... in any ... spent lees ... high-tech ... Yep. You re dead
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Boot <mr.boot@o...> wrote:
      > Harry, you're absolutely right about my sloppy reference to
      hydrated lime
      > as calcium carbonate when the term more usually refers to calcium
      > hydroxide. If you do a search on it you'll notice that the
      term "lime" is
      > pretty loosely used, and I myself can never keep straight just
      which kind
      > of lime is which.
      >
      > However, my point about the calcium in preference to sodium is
      still valid.
      > In the otherwise excellent equations you provide, I think you've
      confused
      > "bicarbonate" ions (HCO3-) with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3),
      therefore
      > telling only half the story.
      >
      > Another way to look at it is that if you put sodium into your wash
      in any
      > form, whether as salt or baking soda, it has to come out in the
      spent lees
      > somehow (can't just disappear, unless you're running one of those
      high-tech
      > nuclear stills).
      >
      > Kind regards,
      >
      > Boot


      Yep. You're dead right about the sodium, Boot. My apologies.
      Must've had a brain fart. (old age sneakin' up) :-)
      As to the other thing. I think I'd be using the chalk instead of
      the hydroxide, but first check the pH.
      Chalk is commonly used in fruit mashes to raise the pH. Most fruit
      mashes are around 2.5 - 3.5 pH, which is way too low for effective
      yeast activity. It's ok for wines, which carry on a second
      fermentation over many months, but not for fruit brandy production.
      For fruit brandies, use chalk at the rate of about 5g per 1kg fruit
      in the mash. BTW, did you know it takes almost 5kg fruit to produce
      a single 700ml bottle of brandy? I think I'd rather eat the
      fruit! :-)

      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • Boot
      ... Aha! So chalk is used in the wine industry? Very interesting. I wonder why they choose chalk? A cost thing perhaps. I still reckon that the hydrated lime
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        At 03:18 PM 12/1/03 +0000, you wrote:
        >Yep. You're dead right about the sodium, Boot. My apologies.
        >Must've had a brain fart. (old age sneakin' up) :-)
        >As to the other thing. I think I'd be using the chalk instead of
        >the hydroxide, but first check the pH.
        >Chalk is commonly used in fruit mashes to raise the pH. Most fruit
        >mashes are around 2.5 - 3.5 pH, which is way too low for effective
        >yeast activity. It's ok for wines, which carry on a second
        >fermentation over many months, but not for fruit brandy production.
        >For fruit brandies, use chalk at the rate of about 5g per 1kg fruit
        >in the mash. BTW, did you know it takes almost 5kg fruit to produce
        >a single 700ml bottle of brandy? I think I'd rather eat the
        >fruit! :-)

        Aha! So chalk is used in the wine industry? Very interesting.

        I wonder why they choose chalk? A cost thing perhaps. I still reckon that
        the hydrated lime should be, if anything, even more benign because the OH-
        ions should pick up the acid's H+ ions to make H20, or water. With chalk,
        some CO2 would be formed as well -- not that CO2 is a problem.

        Both my sugar and molasses batches seem to start off at around pH 5.5
        without any intervention, but I suspect that they drop into highly acidic
        territory pretty quickly. There's not much to buffer them. My litmus paper
        only goes down to 4.5, so I don't know how much lower the pH reaches. Next
        run I'm think I'm going to dump some of that hydrated lime in every so
        often and try to keep the pH up a little higher. I'll see if it helps the
        fermentation rate at all.

        You're right about the fruit brandy scene, Harry. It's a pretty crazy thing
        to do with perfectly good fruit.

        Speaking of which, I accidentally fermented some pineapple juice recently
        when my cheeky little yeasties found their way into the container. So now
        I've got a couple of bottles of pine wine, which is not very nice, but will
        go to a good cause in my next neutral run. Such fun.

        Cheers,

        Boot
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.