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Re: Building single reducer still (Bokakob)

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  • jimpuchai
    ... that ... top ... tape ... America? ... Hello Walter, I am sure that there as many variations on these designs as there are people who make them. This is my
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 24, 2003
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pawlowski_w" <pawlowski_w@y...>
      wrote:
      > I would like to make the still from the plans on
      > www.homedistillers.org/image/alex_sr.jpg which was designed by
      > BOKAKOB but I am new to this stuff so I have couple of questions
      that
      > someone hopefully can answer here.
      >
      > 1. What temperature of vapours should the thermometer show when
      > inserted into the thermometer sleve? Is that where the 78C (172F)
      > should show? Where can I buy this kind of Thermometer?
      > 2. The teflon tape to seal the termometer rod - is that a regular
      > teflon tape used in plumbing or is it special kind?
      > 3. One connection (under the condenser coil section and the very
      top
      > section) says "Tight fit", does it mean that I should use teflon
      tape
      > to seal it without soldering this spot?
      > 4. Anyone knows where can I buy the 2x3/4 reducer in Northern
      America?
      > 5. Where can I buy alcohol meter with a scale from 0 - 100%?
      >
      > Regards,
      > Walter.

      Hello Walter,
      I am sure that there as many variations on these designs as there
      are people who make them. This is my way of getting the probe tip to
      the right spot and keeping it there without leaking, and without
      teflon tape.
      I suppose you could call this the poor mans thermo-well. Take about
      6 inches of 1/4in copper tube. Block one end with a short plug of
      brass and solder(lead free). For the brass plug use a short section
      sawn off a suitable size wood screw. When neatly plugged and
      soldered, sand or file to the same diameter as the tube. Push
      through the hole in the column until a point 3/4 inch back from the
      plug end is centered in the column. This will bring the tip of the
      probe to the correct point. Solder the tube in place on the column
      and then cut off the excess tube. Leave about three inches outside.
      I use a thermometer made for testing food and liquids. Push some
      thin string into your tube then gently push the probe in until it
      bottoms. The string will stop your thermometer from sliding around.

      There will be a small thermal lag using this method. I prefer to
      think of it as a means of getting an average reading over a few
      seconds rather than over a half second. You can now use the
      thermometer for occasional other measurements without fear of losing
      some product to the angels.

      Long winded as usual,

      Jim
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