Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Rum

Expand Messages
  • Harry
    ... Group for Great Grandad s Rum . A had to sit down and break the quantities down to manageable sizes and also had to make a few assumptions. First up the
    Message 1 of 42 , Nov 17, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Elliott"
      <r_selliott@b...> wrote:
      > Hi Group,
      >
      > Thanks for all the recent advice on brewin' rum.
      >
      > I recently downloaded the recipe from a link from Distiller's
      Group for "Great Grandad's Rum". A had to sit down and break the
      quantities down to manageable sizes and also had to make a few
      assumptions. First up the quantities come out something like this
      > 1st Day
      >
      > 450 grams molasses
      >
      > 110 grams brown sugar
      >
      > 1.8 litres water
      >
      > 100 grams boiled potatoes in muslin bag
      >
      > 100 grams maize boiled
      >
      > 5 grams oak shavings
      >
      > (potatoes and maize stay in mash until ready to distil)
      >
      > 1 tablespoon of yeast
      >
      > 2nd Day
      >
      > 450 grams molasses
      >
      > 110 grams brown sugar
      >
      > 3rd Day
      >
      > 450 grams molasses
      >
      > 1.8 litres water
      >
      > Distillation and aging
      >
      > Distil when fermentation has completed. Add 5 grams of oak
      shavings, a dry clove, 50 grams fresh pineapple and a teaspoon of
      raisins.
      >
      > Allow to breath for 24 hours before sealing.
      >
      > Let stand for 7 days, dilute to 38%, colour with caramelised white
      sugar and filter before drinking.
      >
      > The assumptions that I made were that, seeing I did not have an
      oak barrel, then it would be okay to add oak shavings to the wash to
      replicate the wash being fermented on oak. I decided to use Treacle
      instead of molasses and Alcotec 24 hr super yeast as I wanted a
      quick ferment plus I already had it on hand. I have since found out
      from Gert Strandt that he recommends using black label yeast that he
      supplies to many major distillers and that molasses will only
      ferment out to around 10%.
      >
      > At the completion of fermentation around 4 days (it actually only
      fermented out to around 1.005 - I believe that there may have been
      far too much Treacle in the wash) I ran it through my still. My
      still is a small aluminium 5 litre capacity produced in NZ and it is
      supposedly a reflux type, but I believe it is more of a pot by the
      nature of it's construction. Normally the ethanol during a run
      of "vodka" starts to come off at around 85C and even though I can
      take off to 93C (the instructions supplied), I stop at 88C and keep
      the next part to 93C for a separate run. With the rum it starts to
      come of at around 87C. I decided to stop at 92C otherwise it really
      gets into the fusel oils.
      >
      > The results: I'm not sure if the clove is of benefit or detriment.
      It has a slightly bitter taste although not unpleasant.I will do
      another run to 93C and not add the clove and then another run
      cutting at 92C to see what the difference is. I think I will also
      cut back on the amount of Treacle. The pineapple strips give it a
      pleasant sweet taste. I like that in a rum.
      >
      > Okay "rumbo's", please pick it to death. Tell me if I have done
      something wrong and fill me in on any of your experiences with rum.
      Any criticism will be greatly appreciated.
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Bob.




      Hi Bob,
      The measurements are imperial (not U.S. gallons).
      The yeast used was home-grown bakers variety. There
      were no turbos nor specialty shops in the middle of the
      Queensland bush. :-)
      The fermentation is a traditional "step-fermentation"
      because of the yeast used.
      Molasses is 50% heavier than water for the same volume.
      A standard milking bucket (circa 1870) was 10 qts.(2.5
      gallons) imperial.
      Full grade Maize (corn) is 1.5 qts. volume per 1 kg
      weight.
      A standard beer bottle was 26 fl.oz.
      ______________________________________
      volumes

      60 minims = 1 fluid drachm
      8 fluid drachms = 1 fluid ounce
      20 fluid ounces = 1 pint
      4 gills = 1 pint
      2 pints = 1 quart
      4 quarts = 1 gallon
      2 gallons = 1 peck
      4 pecks = 1 bushel
      8 bushels = 1 quarter
      36 bushels = 1 chaldron
      ______________________________________
      avoirdupois weights

      16 ounces = 1 pound
      14 pounds = 1 stone
      28 pounds = 1 quarter
      4 quarters = 1 hundredweight
      112 pounds = 1 hundredweight
      20 hundredweight = 1 ton
      2240 pounds = 1 ton
      ______________________________________

      Therefore the recipe is...


      4 gals. molasses = 60 lbs. = 27.25 kg.
      16 gals. water = 160 lbs. = 72.7 kg. ( or lt.)
      10 lb. brown sugar = 4.5 kg.
      3/4 milk bucket MAize (corn) = 7.5 qts. = 5 kg.
      26 fl.oz. liquid yeast = 750 gms. (mls.)
      8 lbs. old potatoes = 3.5 kg
      ______________________________________

      Your breakdown...
      appears to be 1/40th., according to the water weights.


      1st Day should be

      450 grams molasses 680g

      110 grams brown sugar

      1.8 litres water

      100 grams potatoes 85g

      100 grams maize boiled 125g

      5 grams oak shavings

      (potatoes and maize stay in mash until ready to distil)

      1 tablespoon of yeast 20ml liquid

      2nd Day

      450 grams molasses 680g

      110 grams brown sugar

      3rd Day

      450 grams molasses 680g

      1.8 litres water

      _________________________________________

      Footnote.

      I have grave doubts that such a small sample batch

      would work like a large batch. As you can see, with

      such small weights involved it's too easy to "slip"

      with the measurements, and even a small difference can

      mean a large mistake when you convert to percentages.

      Your molasses is out by 50%
      Your maize is out by 25%
      Your potatoes is out by 15%

      Also,for very small batches you need to INCREASE the

      percentage of YEAST used, otherwise it doesn't get a

      good start. This is the inverse of the old rule...
      "Double the batch, but only by half for yeast"

      Hope this helps.


      Slainte!
      regards Harry

      p.s.
      The "Great-Great_Grandad" mentioned was my ancestor. :-))
    • waljaco
      I have no idea where to get Clostridia bacteria, so I just add Indonesian ragi and Chinese jiuqu rice yeasts which are available to me in Chinese grocery
      Message 42 of 42 , Mar 28, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I have no idea where to get Clostridia bacteria, so I just add Indonesian ragi and Chinese jiuqu rice yeasts which are available to me in Chinese grocery stores. These provide wild tropical yeasts and bacteria.
        wal
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
        >
        > Beverages, AH Varnam & JM Sutherland
        > Rum, pages 418-421 (free!)
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/cgwfmd
        >
        > wal
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.